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by Quentin Bates
Download Frozen Assets: Introducing the Gunnhilder Mystery Series Set in Iceland fb2
Mystery
  • Author:
    Quentin Bates
  • ISBN:
    1569478678
  • ISBN13:
    978-1569478677
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Soho Crime; First Thus edition (January 18, 2011)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mystery
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1485 kb
  • ePUB format
    1722 kb
  • DJVU format
    1587 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    759
  • Formats:
    mobi lit azw mbr


Mystery A police procedural novel, set in Iceland, Frozen Assets has a great cast of characters (even though Icelandic names don't easily roll off the tongue and are a bit hard to keep track of), a good plot with some twists.

A police procedural novel, set in Iceland, Frozen Assets has a great cast of characters (even though Icelandic names don't easily roll off the tongue and are a bit hard to keep track of), a good plot with some twists, high level corruption from the government and the ultra-rich, and set against the big Icelandic financial crash.

A body is found floating in the harbor of a rural Icelandic fishing.

Quentin bates series: Gunnhilder Mystery. Quentin Bates Quentin Bates lived in Iceland for ten years before moving back to the UK in 1990, where he became a full-time journalist at a commercial fishing magazine

Quentin bates series: Gunnhilder Mystery. Cold Breath (Gunnhildur Mystery Book 7). Quentin Bates. 104. Published: 2018. A body is found floating in the harbor of a rural Icelandic fishing village. Quentin Bates lived in Iceland for ten years before moving back to the UK in 1990, where he became a full-time journalist at a commercial fishing magazine. He and his wife frequently return to Iceland, where they have many friends, including several in the Reykjavík police.

Gunnhilder Mystery - 1 ). Bates does a fine job with both Gunna and her town, her acerbic boss and an online blogger who keeps us abreast of events in Icelandic media and politics. Toronto Globe and Mail

Gunnhilder Mystery - 1 ). Toronto Globe and Mail. British author and sometime Icelandic resident Bates embeds his well-paced mystery in this strange time, making (some) sense of it for American readers while introducing us to a heroine we could enjoy for the long haul.

Frozen Assets" is a piercing look at the endemic corruption that led to the global . A Sergeant Gunnhildur Novel.

Frozen Assets" is a piercing look at the endemic corruption that led to the global financial crisis that bankrupted Iceland's major banks and sent the country into an economic tailspin from which it has yet to recover. Показать все 2 объявления с новыми товарами. Her investigation uncovers a web of corruption connected to Iceland's business and banking communities. Meanwhile, a rookie crime journalist latches onto her, looking for a scoop, and an anonymous blogger is stirring up trouble.

Quentin Bates lived in Iceland for ten years, during which time he got married, produced a family, and generally went native. He moved back to the UK with his family in 1990 and became a full-time journalist at a commercial fishing magazine. He and his wife frequently return to Iceland, where they have many friends, including several in the Reykjavik police.

A Sergeant Gunnhildur Novel: Frozen Assets : 1 by Quentin Blake. A book set in your home state.

Title: Frozen Assets: Introducing the Gunnhilder Mystery Series Set in Iceland Author(s): Quentin Bates .

When set in Iceland, I expect more of the story would have interesting Icelandic backgrounds. More Books by Quentin Bates.

Thoroughly enjoyed it. I had trouble keeping track of all the Icelandic names and characters but it was worth the effort. Looking forward to the next novel by Bates. NotBrightEnough, 03/07/2018. Just ok. When set in Iceland, I expect more of the story would have interesting Icelandic backgrounds. Alas, other than the characters’ names, the story could be dropped into any big city. And the story itself was average with too many plot contrivances. RetiredInnkeeper, 01/18/2016. Good character development. Likable main character.

A body is found floating in the harbor of a rural Icelandic fishing village. Was it an accident, or something more sinister?  It’s up to Officer Gunnhildur, a sardonic female cop, to find out. Her investigation uncovers a web of corruption connected to Iceland’s business and banking communities. Meanwhile, a rookie crime journalist latches onto her, looking for a scoop, and an anonymous blogger is stirring up trouble. The complications increase, as do the stakes, when a second murder is committed. Frozen Assets is a piercing look at the endemic corruption that led to the global financial crisis that bankrupted Iceland’s major banks and sent the country into an economic tailspin from which it has yet to recover.

Inertedub
Other reviews give a good overview of the story, so I'll focus more on the writing. This is a police procedural, without a doubt, but a substantial part of the book is dedicated to the early stages of the crash of the Icelandic economy. As an analyst with a background in business, I would have preferred a few more details in this area, since I know little of the exact effects, there. But, like many of the social issues, including government corruption and foreign influence in a small country, it is handled well, and it's entirely appropriate for the story.
Some have said they found the numerous characters and places difficult to keep straight (particularly the foreign names). Perhaps a glossary would help. I had little difficulty following them, other than a few minor characters. I enjoy reading stories set in foreign countries when they provide insight into the locale and its people. I think this novel does that well, and that may be one of the reasons I hoped for a bit more background on the financial crisis.
As for the style of storytelling, this tends toward the subtle end of the spectrum. It's not a pure action story, where everything is laid out for you. Details from one scene come into play later, and many elements of the story are revealed as a single comment or an observation during a scene about something else. I get bored with books that spell everything out. In the end, things don't play out as expected, but almost all of the subplots are wrapped up well. Clearly, serious thought was given to proper structure and conclusion, and I appreciate the effort.
As other reviewers have noted, there is little filler. Most scenes are economical. Descriptions are generally brief and interesting, and much of the characterization occurs through hearing main characters' thoughts and seeing how they act on them, not pages of explanation. The characters themselves are interesting, complex, and engaging, if not always likeable.
If this sounds like a novel you'd enjoy, I strongly recommend it, and I have already downloaded a sample of the next in the series (and will probably buy it later today, if it starts as well as this one ended).
Tekasa
This was a pretty good police mystery with national political intrigue and scandal added to the life of a clever, dogged and incorruptible policewoman in small town Iceland. The protagonist, sergeant Gunnhilder or Gunna, is a nicely drawn character, as are most of her colleagues and the peripheral characters. The story involves environmental crimes by government ministers and their wives, public money forming later privatized companies, and a very well-placed but anonymous scandal blogger who reports on these outrages to the public. It also involves a hired killer. I have to say that a few of the villains seemed to come from central casting, unlike the good folks who worked against them or other more ambiguous characters. It wasn't hard to look past the overwrought evil doers, however, because the story did read well. It isn't a hard core crime novel, though the crimes are serious; if you are squeamish about anything it may be the revealed scandals that offend. They were pretty tame by my standards. The global international financial crisis became known through trouble in Iceland, if memory serves me well, and this book describes the kind of things that would have led to it, but from the viewpoint of mostly regular people, government ministers, and the shadow world between them. Recommended.
Malodred
I would have to imagine that it is a real challenge to incorporate the Icelandic economic crisis into a police procedural in a balanced way. Quentin Bates has managed to do this without losing sight of his main character, Gunnhilder. While giving credible voice to a complicated snarl of corporate, political, and environmental issues and behaviors in modern Iceland, the splendid investigative and team-work ability of Gunna is revealed. Even with her physical flaws, Gunna's intelligence and sure-footed persistence in the face of opposition are sure to generate fans, both literary and real.
It is always a challenge to keep up with character's names, especially those of the Nordic cultures. Gunnhildur Gísladótter becomes Gunna. Sigurjóna Huldudóttir becomes Jóna. Vigdis Veigarsdóttir becomes Disa. Bjarni Jón Bjarnson becomes Bjarni Jón-to those who know them personally. This is a lot for an American reader to wrap around. Place names are another brain buster. I found myself wanting a phonetically based list available just so I could do the story some justice, pronunciation-wise. That is an observation, not a complaint. I'll be back no matter what, you can be sure!
Landarn
A police procedural novel, set in Iceland, Frozen Assets has a great cast of characters (even though Icelandic names don't easily roll off the tongue and are a bit hard to keep track of), a good plot with some twists, high level corruption from the government and the ultra-rich, and set against the big Icelandic financial crash. Great stuff. Bates descriptions of Iceland are spot on (from what I've seen during a brief vacation there), and together, everything "fits" and results in a well-written, easily read novel. I'm looking forward to more in the series.
Reddefender
With all of the great reviews I expected much better writing. The characters are easily forgettable as they are called by different names throughout the book, a first name here, a last name later, and so on. The plot was so slow and tortured and it tried to be so many things. A police procedural novel, a political thriller, a murder mystery and it failed at all of them. I tepidly enjoyed the female detective: however, every character was so bland that again it's so easy to lose the narrative and in the end it just wasn't worth keeping track of the myriad characters and all their shenanigans. If this is a first effort, the editor failed the author. I hope the next in this series is better