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by Agatha Christie
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Mystery
  • Author:
    Agatha Christie
  • ISBN:
    0606009612
  • ISBN13:
    978-0606009614
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Demco Media; Turtleback School & Library ed. edition (April 1, 1996)
  • Pages:
    230 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mystery
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1101 kb
  • ePUB format
    1971 kb
  • DJVU format
    1825 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    830
  • Formats:
    azw doc lrf lrf


The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories is a short story collection written by Agatha Christie and first published in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1948.

The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories is a short story collection written by Agatha Christie and first published in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1948. The story The Second Gong features Hercule Poirot, the only character in the stories who appears in any other of Christie's works.

Home Agatha Christie The Witness for the Prosecution. The Witness for the Prosecution, . From the major BBC series The Witness for the Prosecution starring Kim Cattrall, Billy Howle, Toby Jones and Andrea Riseborough. Agatha Christie asserts the moral right to be identified as the author of this work. This novel is entirely a work of fiction. The names, characters and incidents portrayed in it are the work of the author’s imagination. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, events or localities is entirely coincidental.

If you mean that I inquired -" began Leonard Vole hotly, but Mr Mayherne stilled him with a gesture. I have to look at the case as it will be presented by the other side. An ordinary observer would not have supposed Miss French to be a lady of means. She lived poorly, almost humbly. Unless you had been told the contrary, you would in all probability have considered her to be in poor circumstances - at any rate to begin with. Who was it exactly who told you that she was well off?" "My friend, George Harvey, at whose house the party took place.

And Other Stories - The Red Signal - The Fourth Man - . S I picked up this book from my shelves to read only one of the stories, Witness for the Prosecution. Where There's a Will - The Mystery of the Blue Jar - Sing a Song of Sixpence - The Mystery of the Spanish Shawl - Philomel Cottage - Accident - The Second Gong. I picked up this book from my shelves to read only one of the stories, Witness for the Prosecution. I consider this one of the best of the Christie short stories and it doesn't even contain any of the regulars (Poirot, Marple, Quin,et al). And it was made into an equally excellent film with some additional characters and a slightly different ending but did not veer from the final solution.

From the stunning title story to the rarest gems in detective fiction, these tales of baffling crime and brilliant deduction showcase Agatha Christie at her dazzling best. The Witness for the Prosecution. First published: 1925. First published: 1933. The Fourth Man. ⍔ Short Story. First published: 1934.

Agatha Christie was an English detective novelist and playwright whose books have sold more than 100 million . In the United States, the story was first published in the 1948 collection, The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories.

Educated at home by her mother, Christie began writing detective fiction while working as a nurse during World War I. Her first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, introduced Hercule Poirot, her eccentric and egotistic Belgian detective. Christie’s first major recognition came with The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, which was followed by some 75 novels that usually made best-seller lists.

Agatha Christie’s 1925 short 23-page story was written perfectly, just to the point, without an unnecessary word. It takes under half an hour to read it. She adapted her story as a play in 1953 and changed the ending in a dramatic manner

Agatha Christie’s 1925 short 23-page story was written perfectly, just to the point, without an unnecessary word. She adapted her story as a play in 1953 and changed the ending in a dramatic manner. Later, when people recognized how wonderful and surprising the story was and wanted to make a film of it, they had to expand the tale well-beyond what the master wrote to fill the time needed for a film

From the stunning title story (which inspired the classic film thriller) to the rarest gems in detective fiction, these eleven tales of baffling crime and brilliant deduction showcase Agatha Christie at her dazzling best.

From the stunning title story (which inspired the classic film thriller) to the rarest gems in detective fiction, these eleven tales of baffling crime and brilliant deduction showcase Agatha Christie at her dazzling best. Thriller & Crime Fiction Short Stories. One fee. Stacks of books. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline. Bookmate – an app that makes you want to read.

Dame Agatha Christie is the world's best-known mystery writer. During a writing career that spanned more than half a century, she created two of the world's most famous detectives. Hercule Poirot and Miss Jane Marple. The author of 79 novels and short story collections, she was also an accomplished playwright-one of her 14 plays, The Mousetrap, is the longest-running play in history.

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Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories is a collection of eleven tantalizing tales of murder and other criminal pursuits-including the classic title story, the basis for the 1957 Oscar-nominated Billy Wilder film starring Marlene Dietrich, Tyrone Power, and Charles Laughton. carousel previous carousel next.

Eleven stories deal with a murder trial, a premonition of death, a ghostly possession, a mysterious cry for help, a poisoning, and a wealthy aunt's will

Hudora
This is not really a book. It is a short story. That makes it very fast. It finishes so it's "developed"--the basic turn is there. It is both predictable and suspenseful depending on whether you have ever heard the story or book or several versions of The Witness for the Prosecution. I bought the "book" to see if I could find the first time the idea was published. I disliked the most recent version on TV. "Disliked" is probably mild. I thought it was pretty terrible, although it was visually excellent. If you want to see the best version, check out the Billy Wilder (Director) version, with Tyrone Power, Marlene Dietrich and the marvelous Charles Laughton from 1957.
Dogrel
This is an Agatha Christie classic. I've seen the movie before and had read dozens of Agatha Christie books when I was a kid, but I'd never had the opportunity to read this story. It's clever and entertaining, and if you're not familiar with the movie, I think you'd enjoy it all the more. It's a quick read, can be finished in one sitting, and is a stand-alone story that doesn't feature Christie's most famous detectives, so you need not be familiar with any of the characters. For the price, it's definitely worth it.
Ieslyaenn
Agatha Christie’s 1925 short 23-page story was written perfectly, just to the point, without an unnecessary word. It takes under half an hour to read it. She adapted her story as a play in 1953 and changed the ending in a dramatic manner.
Later, when people recognized how wonderful and surprising the story was and wanted to make a film of it, they had to expand the tale well-beyond what the master wrote to fill the time needed for a film. They did so in the 1949, 1953, and 1982 TV versions, the 1957 movie version, the 2016 two part BBC series of the tale, and in the 2017 film which combined the two BBC parts into a single movie.
The story was originally published as “Traitor Hands.” The solicitor to 33-year-old impoverished Leonard Vole, who is accused of the murder of the rich elderly Emily French, is convinced that Vale is innocent. Vale tells him that he first met French, who was some 40 years his senior, when he helped pick up some packages she dropped, and he left her immediately after helping her. He happened to meet her again at a party she attended, when he visited a friend who told him that she was very rich. She liked him and requested that he visit her, told him she is lonely, requested he come again, and on the 3rd or 4th visit she requested he handle her finances, but he never derived any benefit by doing so and did not know that she had made him her primary beneficiary.
His account is disputed by the old lady’s maid who insists she heard the lady talking to a man at 9:30 PM, although she does not know what man, Emely French hoped to marry Vole because he never told her he was already married, and that French told her Vole knew about the will. Vole tells his solicitor that this testimony proves his innocence since his wife can confirm that he came home at 9:20.
The solicitor visits the wife who states she is not really married to Vole because she is already married to a man who is insane, her husband came home at 10:30 and admitted killing the old lady.
The solicitor then receives a letter from an elderly woman proving that the supposed wife is lying. What happens next is surprising.
Virtual
Agatha Christie's "The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories" is a collection of 11 of her fairly early short stories (I've included a list of those stories at the bottom of this review). Officially, the book is 275 pages long, so these 11 stories average out to a pretty short 25 pages each. In general, the stories start with a highly contrived situation, proceed through some fairly ridiculous actions, and then arrive at their painfully obvious end (in a few cases, by introducing new data in the last page or so). Of the 11 stories, only one, "Mr. Eastwood's Adventure," was actually enjoyable. And, even that one had an obvious ending. So, I'm rating the whole collection at a Not Very Good 2 stars out of 5.

The short stories in this collection are:

1. The Witness for the Prosecution ("Traitor's Hands" 31 January 1925)
2. The Red Signal (June 1924)
3. The Fourth Man (December 1925)
4. S.O.S. (February 1926)
5. Wireless (September 1925)
6. The Mystery of the Blue Jar (July 1924)
7. Sing a Song of Sixpence (2 December 1929)
8. Mr. Eastwood's Adventure ("The Mystery of the Second Cucumber" August 1924, then "The Mystery of the Spanish Shawl")
9. Philomel Cottage (November 1924)
10. Accident ("The Uncrossed Path" 22 September 1929)
11. The Second Gong (June-July 1932, expanded to "Dead Man's Mirror" March 1937)
Yggfyn
Don't miss this! If you have seen the classic movie with Charles Laughton, Marlene Dietrich, Elsa Lanchester, and the always delightful Una O'Connor, you'll know the story. The book and the film naturally have a few differences, like all books-into-movies do, but I was delighted with both. I highly recommend reading the book- okay, okay, so it's not a book, it's a short story- and seeing the movie. Both are a lovely way to spend a day, or part of one.
Groll
I love Agatha Christie, and especially her well written short stories.

I thought I had read all of her short stories, but most of these were new to me.

This is a collection of her very early short mystery stories, mostly written in the 1920s, and they are all very good. Only one, the last one which was written in the 1930s, features one of her famous detectives, Poirot. Some deal with the supernatural. All are interesting and well written.