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by Margery Allingham
Download More Work for the Undertaker: Albert Campion #13 fb2
Mystery
  • Author:
    Margery Allingham
  • ISBN:
    193460948X
  • ISBN13:
    978-1934609484
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Felony & Mayhem (January 16, 2010)
  • Pages:
    270 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mystery
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1817 kb
  • ePUB format
    1295 kb
  • DJVU format
    1955 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    244
  • Formats:
    lrf azw mbr doc


Book 13 of 21 in the Albert Campion Mystery Series. Then there is the undertaker (Jas Bowles & Son), a creation any author would be proud to claim.

Book 13 of 21 in the Albert Campion Mystery Series. I am an unabashed admirer of Margery Allingham’s work, and this is one of her most splendid, in many respects. For starters, it gives us some important clues into just who Albert Campion really is. The War (WWII) is over, and Campion is in line to become Governor of some unnamed island. We are told that finally, the man is offered something even his grandfather would consider suitable.

Margery AllinghamMore Work for the UndertakerSimilar books. by Margery Allingham. John Franklin Bardin's most acclaimed work plays a virtuoso performance on music and madness in this unforgettable thriller. Books similar to More Work for the Undertaker (Albert Campion Mystery, More Work for the Undertaker (Albert Campion Mystery, by Margery Allingham. Elegant and engaging detective Albert Campion investigates two deaths in the eccentric Palinode household. In 1946 New York, Ellen, a world-renowned musician, is suffering from th. ore.

More Work for the Undertaker is a crime novel by Margery Allingham, first published in 1948, in the United Kingdom by William Heinemann, London and in the United States by Doubleday, New York. It is the thirteenth novel in the Albert Campion series. The book focuses on Apron Street, an isolated neighborhood in London. Going "up Apron street" has become a byword for a criminal vanishing. This proves to be done by the Bowels family, the undertakers of the title

Fandoms: Albert Campion - Margery Allingham.

Fandoms: Albert Campion - Margery Allingham.

In a masterpiece of storytelling Margery Allingham sends her elegant and engaging detective Albert Campion into the eccentric . When you tell them of a vi-hi-o-lent death! More work for the Undertaker, Another little job for the Tombstone Maker, At the local cem-e-tery they’ve.

In a masterpiece of storytelling Margery Allingham sends her elegant and engaging detective Albert Campion into the eccentric Palinode household, where there have been two suspicious deaths. And if poisoning were not enough, there are also anonymous letters, sudden violence and a vanishing coffin. Meanwhile the Palinodes go about their nocturnal business and Campion dices with danger in his efforts to find the truth. Margery Allingham was born in London in 1904.

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Margaret Allingham was a prolific writer who sold her first story at age eight and published her first novel before turning 20. Allingham went on to become one of the pre-eminent writers who helped bring the detective story to maturity in the 1920s and 1930s. Country of Publication.

This is the final book in which Margery Allingham writes as Maxwell March.

11 January 2018 at 07:19. This is the final book in which Margery Allingham writes as Maxwell March. The Great Detectives: Albert Campion by Mike Ripley GO BACK TO ARTICLES MAIN PAGE His name is Albert Campion,’ she said.

Book in the Albert Campion Series). It takes quite a bit more effort to read than novels we find on today's best seller list, partly because of the linguistic differences and partly, probably, because of the setting and the time. More Work for the Undertaker. com User, December 6, 2001.

More Work for the Undertaker. More vintage murder mysteries. Celebrated detective Albert Campion awakes in hospital accused of attacking a police officer and suffering from acute amnesia. All he can remember is that he was on a mission of vital importance to His Majesty's government before his accident.

Apron Lane is a little bit of Dickensian London that still appears to be flourishing in the brave new post-War world. Urchins abound, and a quasi-feudal order is maintained by the eccentric Palinode family, once the squires of Apron Street and still expecting a certain forelock-tugging deference, even as their fortunes have evaporated. The Apron might be nothing more than an amusing anachronism if its Dickensian aspect did not include a distinctly Bill Sykes-style of omnipresent threat. With the police prototypically baffled, Campion takes up local lodgings in an effort to identify the source of the violence.

DART-SKRIMER
I am an unabashed admirer of Margery Allingham’s work, and this is one of her most splendid, in many respects.

For starters, it gives us some important clues into just who “Albert Campion” really is. The War (WWII) is over, and Campion is in line to become Governor of some unnamed island. We are told that finally, the man is offered something “even his grandfather” would consider suitable. And his man Lugg refers to Albert as “the young viscount” at one point. All this is by way of reminding us the exalted position that the unassuming Albert apparently holds in abeyance.

Then there are the characters we meet. Of course there is the splendid Lugg (of whom we learn a little more about in the course of the story). There are the Scotland Yard folks, notably the Chief Stanislaus Oates, Superintendent Yeo and the young, brilliant D. D. I. Charles Luke (again, we learn quite a bit more about Luke here). The Lady Amanda, Albert’s spouse, has an important cameo role and in a way is given the opportunity for the last word (always satisfying, don’t you think?”

The new and indelibly memorable characters belong to the eccentric Palinode family. Allingham outdoes herself in her depiction of characters at once extremely odd, unaccountably appealing, and uncommonly intelligent. Then there is the undertaker (Jas Bowles & Son), a creation any author would be proud to claim.

The story itself full of momentous happenings, poisonings, anonymous letters, a magnificent coffin that appears and disappears seemingly at will, a sizeable but apparently worthless inheritance, and a case that Scotland Yard wants very much to solve--quietly and quickly.

This is a fun, adventurous and challenging read from beginning to end.
Hellmaster
The book has many of Allinghan's usual characters, Mr. Campion, Lugg, and Charlie Luke. It reprises some from earlier novels, Renee Roper appears in Dancers in Mourning and here she is again and just as delightful. We also get to meet Lugg's brother in law and company as well as a street full of unique and memorable characters. This book as great fun to read, the plot is entirely original and the final unravelling is truly singular. As always with Allingham, the characters are three dimensional and human, whether they be hero, villain or just part of the neighborhood. I really loved reading this book.
Goltikree
Allingham was among the best of the outstanding British authors who brought the classic mystery story to its peak. Whether she ranks below or with Christie or Sayers is to me a matter of indifference. Her work is always marked by literate prose and interesting characterizations. Sometimes the mystery is better than at other times but reading her is always a pleasure. This one, I see Albert Campion # 13, shows him facing a difficult decision after the War (WW2): be Governor of a British possession or assist the Police in their inquiries. He may have had his doubts but we, his faithful readers, never did. So it is we find him here enmeshed in a mystery in which the key roles are all played by eccentrics, peculiar even in a country like England, notable for a citizenry rife with individualists in spirit though their dress may make them invisible in a crowd.
I agree with some readers that there is more than a little to confuse the reader in the plot but never mind. It is the array of characters, good or evil that he encounters, and his relationship to the official police, that is the heart of the matter. Then there is a reappearance of his Watson, Lugg, after what appears to have been a hiatus of association due to the war.
Regular readers should have no fear. The mastery of English prose is still to be found, as is the adeptness in character development. The story, itself, is interesting but a bit off, a bit too tangled, to put it among her best works. Still it is a good demonstration by one of the Mistresses of crime writing and well worth the time spent with it.
Rko
I had never read Margery Allingham before, and took a chance. Wow! I just meant to dip my toe into a vintage author; instead I was pulled headlong into a fascinating puzzle of mystery and intrigue. Albert Campion is so much more than a garden-variety police inspector; he is very three-dimensional, and surprisingly winsome. He turns down a promotion to look for a vanished criminal. Eventually, he is led to Apron Street, a down-at-heels bastion of former feudal glory. Well-drawn, appealingly eccentric characters make their appearances, strings of inquiry weave together, and Albert (taking a room in the area) gets closer and closer to uncovering a very sinister scheme. I thought this was a wonderful read, and was sorry to reach the end (although happy have the mystery solved).
Arilak
Felony and Mayhem press has done everyone a service by reissuing Margery Allingham's Mr. Campion mysteries in easy to read paperbacks.
MORE WORK FOR THE UNDERTAKER tells the story of Albert Campion's first major mystery after the end of World War II. Campion has been chosen to go to be governor of some distant tropical island, but his old pre-war hobby of getting involved in mysteries soon takes over. It seems his man Lugg had a sister who had married a man with the last name of Bowels who is an undertaker by trade. Lugg's brother in law wants Campion to come to a quiet part of London called Apron street where some very intellectual types-the Palinodes-have bumped up against murder. Mr. Campion is happy to say no to the promised foreign posting as governor and return to his pre-war love-Murder. This book introduces the policeman-Charlie Luke-who is a favorite in later Margery Allingham mysteries.
MORE WORK FOR THE UNDERTAKER is well written, a good mystery and very much in the grand tradition of Great British Murder Mysteries.