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by Qiu Xiaolong
Download Enigma of China: An Inspector Chen Novel (Inspector Chen Cao) fb2
Mystery
  • Author:
    Qiu Xiaolong
  • ISBN:
    125002580X
  • ISBN13:
    978-1250025807
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Minotaur Books; 1st edition (June 18, 2013)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mystery
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1149 kb
  • ePUB format
    1139 kb
  • DJVU format
    1997 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    825
  • Formats:
    txt rtf lrf mbr


In many of the Inspector Chen novels, Qiu portrays traditional Shanghai life amidst the old alleyways and also . Qiu Xiaolong’s work has been criticized by Chinese critics and readers who claim that his depiction of China is not real as his target audience is primarily Western readers.

Qiu Xiaolong’s work has been criticized by Chinese critics and readers who claim that his depiction of China is not real as his target audience is primarily Western readers.

Xiaolong Qiu - скачать бесплатно все книги автора. Inspector Chen Cao of the Shanghai Police Bureau and Inspector Catherine Rohn of the US Marshals service must work together to find a missing woman. Книги 1-13 из 13. A Case of Two Cities. She is married to an important witness in a US criminal case who has refused to testify unless his pregnant wife is allowed to join him. The Chinese government has reluctantly agreed to let her go and the Americans have sent a marshal to escort her.

Chief Inspector Chen Cao of the Shanghai Police Department is in an unusual situation-a poet by training and inclination, he was . Enigma of China by Qiu Xiaolong is one of Publishers Weekly's Best Mystery/Thriller Books of 2013.

Chief Inspector Chen Cao of the Shanghai Police Department is in an unusual situation-a poet by training and inclination, he was assigned by the party to the Police Department after he graduated college, where he has continued to shine. Now he's a rising cadre in the party, in line to take over the top politic position in the police department, while being one of most respected policeman in the department.

Poet and gourmand, Inspector Chen of the Shanghai Police Bureau is called in to oversee the investigation into the death of the .

Poet and gourmand, Inspector Chen of the Shanghai Police Bureau is called in to oversee the investigation into the death of the Director of The Shanghai Development Committee while under house arrest. He has to negotiate the power of the Party, an internet campaign and a new potential romance. Dramatised by John Harvey. Director: David Hunter.

Enigma of China book. Enigma of China" is the eighth of Qiu Xiaolong's Inspector Chen novels, all 9 of which have been dramatised for BBC Radio 4. They h From BBC radio 4 - Drama: Poet and gourmand, Inspector Chen of the Shanghai Police Bureau is called in to oversee the investigation into the death of the Director of The Shanghai Development Committee while under house arrest.

Liked all of his books with Chief Inspector Chen Cao! Great insights into Chinese way of life and it's past influences on the present. Nice character development.

A Case of Two Cities: An Inspector Chen Novel (Inspector Chen Novels). Download (epub, 700 Kb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF.

Chief Inspector Chen Cao of the Shanghai Police Department is in an unusual situation?a poet by training and inclination, he was . Qiu Xiaolong's Enigma of China is one of Publishers Weekly 's Best Mystery/Thriller Books of 2013.

Chief Inspector Chen Cao of the Shanghai Police Department is in an unusual situation?a poet by training and inclination, he was assigned by the party to the Police Department after he graduated college, where he has continued to shine.

The eighth novel in Qiu Xiaolong's acclaimed Chinese crime series sees Inspector Chen confronted by a terrible . Chief Inspector Chen Cao never had a choice about his career

The eighth novel in Qiu Xiaolong's acclaimed Chinese crime series sees Inspector Chen confronted by a terrible choice between Party politics or his principles - with his career at stake. Chief Inspector Chen Cao never had a choice about his career. A poet by training, he was assigned to the Shanghai Police Department after college. To his own surprise, he became an excellent detective, and now he's in line to take over the top political position in the department.

Detective Inspector (and poet) Chen Cao of the Shanghai police has been called to take over an important investigation of the corruption that is a. .Enigma of China: An Inspector Chen Novel (Inspector Chen Cao).

Detective Inspector (and poet) Chen Cao of the Shanghai police has been called to take over an important investigation of the corruption that is a serious problem in the upper echelons in the communist party. The Communist Party leadership appears to be taking a rigorous stand investigating this rampant corruption among the profligate power elite during China's economic reforms of the recent past.

Chief Inspector Chen Cao of the Shanghai Police Department is in an unusual situation―a poet by training and inclination, he was assigned by the party to the Police Department after he graduated college, where he has continued to shine. Now he's a rising cadre in the party, in line to take over the top politic position in the police department, while being one of most respected policeman in the department. Which is why he's brought in by the Party to sign off on the investigation into the death of Zhou Keng.

Zhou Keng―a trusted princeling, son of a major party member―was head of the Shanghai Housing Development Committee when a number of his corrupt practices were exposed on the internet. Removed from his position and placed into extra-legal detention, Zhou apparently hanged himself while under guard. While the Party is anxious to have Zhou's death declared a suicide, and for the renowned Chief Inspector Chen to sign off on that conclusion, the sequence of events don't quite add up. Now Chen will have to decide what to do – investigate the death as a possible homicide and risk angering unseen powerful people, or seek the justice that his position requires him to strive for. One of Publishers Weekly's Best Mystery/Thriller Books of 2013


Fenius
Having just returned from 2 years of living in Shanghai, I feel that Qiu Xiaolong has done a masterful job of capturing the enigma of modern China. He gives westerners the rare and hard to understand inside view of how things really work and the cultural dilemma of dealing with obligations, preserving tradition while creating a new future with all of the modernities in our world. It is one thing for a westerner to see, learn to understand from living, befriending Chinese, reading. It is almost impossible to walk in the shoes of a Chinese citizen, see through their eyes, process information, relationships, interactions in the way that Qiu allows us to do. I have loved, through the years, reading all of the Detective Chen novels and in seeing him rise through the party ranks and mature, grow wise. Qiu depicts beautifully the moral dilemma of being a successful rising party cadre who is able to navigate the complex web of political and personal relationships and obligations while, at the same time, maintaining his ethics and drawing the line between what he will do and won't. The only thing I would wish for that I did not get was a bit more closure at the end. I did finish the book understanding the difficulty for the system to change (like the crabs tied together) and the netizen's actions in fighting the system. I did not truly understand "who dun it".
Moogugore
His best to date -- hard to believe for the 8th in the series, but he started the series with a very good book and he's kept improving since; this one is simply superb!
For those who have read his past books: the writing is even better at expressing nuances -- few writers today write such fluid, yet expressive Englsh prose. It is all the more remarkable given that English is not the author's mother tongue. The writing is also better balanced between all venues of life -- the characteristic obsession of Chinese with food is less prominent here, but other aspects of everyday life take the place of elaborate descriptions of dishes. This change is also symbolic of the moral and ethical evolution of Inspector Chen himself, now more battling deeper problems than what to get from the menu. In fact, Chen is definitely evolving; the qualities and weaknesses evident from the beginning of the series are changing, some receding, some strengthening, this evolution turning Chen into a more complex, more solid character -- all of which makes for great reading and keeps the series fresh.
(And for those of us who do not speak Chinese, but would like to learn, we get even more intriguing expressions rendered into English on which we can sharpen our linguistic skills ;-)
Highly recommended, but if you have not yet read any novel in the series, start a few back to enjoy it even more.
Auridora
I think this is Qiu's darkest book so far. Those of us familiar with James Church's Inspector O are already aware--and deeply admire--a cop who loves and supports his country but whose admiration for the powers that be is limited. Inspector Chen has never claimed that China has the best form of government, but in this novel he comes closest to suggesting that it is actually bad for his country.

I am reminded of a comment Anchee Min made once when asked whether what she writes is acceptable to the Chinese government (both are, presumably, US citizens but originate from China). "As long as I don't write in Chinese," was her response.

Both Qiu and Min spend a regular amount of time in China, and I suspect this is why Qiu updated his character--Inspector Chen--a book or two ago. Originally, the series was set in the 1990s, but it's now contemporary, and almost certainly because Qiu is so much aware of what is happening in his beloved Shanghai.

The plot once again involves murder and corruption, with a wee bit of romance. And once again its value lies with the observations this native Chinese writer makes on his native culture. His perspective is, of course, much affected by having been a US resident for so long, but that makes him more like us. Although we can never have his familiarity and understanding of Chinese culture, he can guide us knowing where we need to notice something here, something there.
Brightcaster
I eagerly await each new book in the series of mysteries by Qiu Xiaolong concerning the Shanghai police inspector Chen, who strives for justice while trying to keep his position in a China filled with corruption, not least among the party leadership. Inspector Chen is constantly trying to unravel crimes that his party bosses wish would go unnoticed and unpunished.

The publication of the latest book in the series "The Enigma of China" is very timely, coming as it does immediately after the disclosures of the National Security Agency's Prism program, spying on electronic communications.

In earlier books the inspector was baffled by the world of computers. By now he is familiar with e-mail and the Internet, and they play a major role in the story. A high official falls after an overly detailed photo is posted on a web forum, and a "human-fleshed search", a crowd-sourced hunt by Internet users, turns up more dirt.

The book makes no references to the hacking activities of Chinese government or military agencies. But it does explore the extent the Chinese government is able to control freedom of speech online. With the media under government control or censorship, blogs and social media provide an outlet for free expression. The government and its net cops seeks to stifle dissent there as well, but the picture given in the book is that this control is imperfect.

Much online activity apparently takes place at Internet cafes, but even the imposition of stronger rules there seem to be hard to enforce or often ignored.

The end leaves you wondering if there can be another book in the series, but this one gives a fascinating picture of how information tries to be free in today's online China.