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by Hugh Fraser,Agatha Christie
Download And Then There Were None (Mystery Masters) fb2
Mystery
  • Author:
    Hugh Fraser,Agatha Christie
  • ISBN:
    1572702508
  • ISBN13:
    978-1572702509
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Audio Partners; Unabridged edition (November 9, 2001)
  • Subcategory:
    Mystery
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1613 kb
  • ePUB format
    1207 kb
  • DJVU format
    1549 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    625
  • Formats:
    doc lrf mobi rtf


Home Agatha Christie And Then There Were None. I had written this book because it was so difficult to do that the idea had fascinated me. Ten people had to die without it becoming ridiculous or the murderer being obvious

Home Agatha Christie And Then There Were None. Ten people had to die without it becoming ridiculous or the murderer being obvious.

And Then There Were None is a mystery novel by English writer Agatha Christie, widely considered her masterpiece and described by her as the most difficult of her books to write. It was first published in the United Kingdom by the Collins Crime Club on 6 November 1939, as Ten Little Niggers, after the British blackface song, which serves as a major plot point.

And Then There Were None is a mystery novel by English writer Agatha Christie, described by her as the most difficult of her books to write. It was first published in the United Kingdom by the Collins Crime Club on 6 November 1939, as Ten Little Niggers, after the minstrel song, which serves as a major plot point.

by Agatha Christie (Author), Hugh Fraser (Narrator)

by Agatha Christie (Author), Hugh Fraser (Narrator). Agatha Christie once more leads us on a wild ride through a story that once the murders begin, you have no choice but to continue, even if you put the book down the curiousity would eventually get to you. This masterpiece got darker and more terrifying especially towards the final chapters. I constantly felt my heart racing.

There is scarcely any comfort to be found in this book, only an ancient, arcane horror . The story is a vast underwater cavern, where nothing flows and nothing ebbs and all is as dark and still as the grave. Even my most harrowing nightmares would have never conjured such a soul-fearing tale. If there's a flaw running through And Then There Were None, it's that Christie maintains a respectful distance from her characters, and at times, that distance runs toward dryness.

It must be seven -no, eight years ago. She had then been going to Italy to bask in the sun and be at one with Nature and the contaditd.

Chapter 1. IN THE CORNER of a first-class smoking carriage, Mr. Justice Wargrave, lately retired from the bench, puffed at a cigar and ran an interested eye through the political news in the Times. It must be seven -no, eight years ago. Later, he had heard, she had proceeded to Syria where she proposed to bask in yet stronger sun and live at one with Nature and the bedouin.

Agatha Christie is known throughout the world as the Queen of Crime. For a while it was "ABC Murders". But, having re-read "And Then There Were None," I came to a conclusion that there's simply nothing else like it, and it tops my list. This novel once again proves that Christie was one of the best writers of the 20th century.

When ten people arrive on Indian Island off England's southwest coast, lured to a mansion by invitations from a mysterious host, terror mounts as one guest after another is murdered, in a classic whodunit that is an elaboration of the famous children's rhyme "Ten Little Indians." Read by Hugh Fraser.

Adrierdin
“And Then There Were None” is a thrilling murder mystery written by Agatha Christie. When ten people are invited to Soldier Island by a mysterious character, U. N. Owen, the guests find themselves in a dangerous situation as they watch each other get picked off one by one according to an old nursery rhyme. The novel keeps you guessing, and chances are you won’t know who the murderer is until the last page of the book. Although I enjoyed reading “And Then There Were None”, it was quite hard to motivate myself to get through the first 40 or so pages. The book begins by describing the characters, which is common in books that were written in the 1930’s. It becomes a lengthy process considering the large amount there are, and was my least favorite part of the book. Not that the old style is bad, but it really shines through considering the first line of the book talks about Mr. Justice Wargrave "In the corner of a first-class smoking carriage" on a train. Aside from that, the book was partly predictable. When and how the murders will occur is easy to guess, but who will die and who did it is up in the air, keeping the mystery present. All in all, the cons are not a reason to forgo reading this book. Lastly, the entire book and murder is psychotic, but in an intriguing way. I was disturbed by the end of the book, only because some of the murders and the plan behind them was simply insane. Having said that, Agatha Christie used this to create another of her thrilling mysteries. I would recommend this book, and the advice I would give to a reader is don’t be discouraged as a result of the beginning. Push through the first few sections, and you’ll find a whole new situation which moves much more quickly.
inetserfer
Having just finished my first Agatha Christie novel, I had to ask myself what in the world was I waiting for. This book is a delightful read. It is no wonder that the author has sold more than a billion books worldwide. This book was just plain fun to read. Anyone who has ever seen himself as a amateur detective or who is a big fan of whodunits will be kept guessing at every turn. And the way that the bad guy (or gal) is revealed to the reader in a truly unique way. Go away John Sandford. Hang it up James Patterson. If you have read one you have read them all. I think that I am going to book passage on the Orient Express.
Thorgaginn
Marvelous. I came into this a bonafide Agatha Christie virgin and came out an addict. What a fun, quick-paced read! The characters were clear, and often many levels deeper (and far more sinister) than they appear. Out of the 10 souls stuck on Soldier Island, I did initially guess correctly the mastermind -- but Christie is sooo good at seeding doubt. "Oh, this guy would be logically the murderer. You know who's even more likely? THIS guy."

One of my favorite bits about this well-written whodunnit? The Vera/Philip relationship. Two, young guests on Soldier Island who clearly have some attraction to one another. Christie sets up little hints until she turns it on its head and reminds both characters, "Oh yeah, either one of you could be a megalomaniacal murderer." Screw romance. Romance is dead. Christie is dedicated in this book to just making some macabre fun.
Mogelv
Very, very clever! So clever that I may read it again some day even though I know the ending, or actually BECAUSE I know the ending and want to read once again how Agatha Christie adroitly executed the plot.

Well written and enjoyable.

I wish I could give it 4.5 stars. The only reason I didn't give it five is because it wasn't emotionally satisfying. I didn't connect with the characters and feel their fear as I have in other mysteries, but intellectually it was extremely satisfying.
Arador
Having read everything she had written, I've always debated as to which of Agatha Christie's works tops my list. For a while it was "ABC Murders". But, having re-read "And Then There Were None," I came to a conclusion that there's simply nothing else like it, and it tops my list. This novel once again proves that Christie was one of the best writers of the 20th century. It is so much more than just a "mystery" novel - it has it all: amazing character development, fabulous use of English language, top-notch plot, and knock-your-socks-off ending. One can debate as to whether or not this novel was intended to be "solved" by the reader, but at some point it becomes irrelevant. The originality of this novel is nothing short of stunning! No other "mystery" novel, in my opinion, tops this in terms of psychology, character development, and literary style. An amazing piece written by an amazing writer! In terms of pure "mystery," "ABC Murders" still tops my list, but I consider "And Then There Were None" to be the finest novel Christie has ever written. The only issue I have with this particular edition is: Political Correctness once again surfaces! It substitutes "soldiers" for "indians"!! Not that it makes much difference, but really....... for crying' out loud: GROW UP!!!!!!!!