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by Robert Barnard
Download Skeleton in the Grass fb2
Mystery
  • Author:
    Robert Barnard
  • ISBN:
    0896211894
  • ISBN13:
    978-0896211896
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Thorndike Pr (November 1, 1988)
  • Pages:
    308 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mystery
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1641 kb
  • ePUB format
    1832 kb
  • DJVU format
    1527 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    181
  • Formats:
    lit azw docx lrf


Why not, Sarah wondered? They said they’d found it difficult to remember, they said he seemed to know his job, without being anything as positive as nice or nasty.

Why not, Sarah wondered? They said they’d found it difficult to remember, they said he seemed to know his job, without being anything as positive as nice or nasty y’d said, about what he’d asked them. They didn’t compare notes. Twice Sarah caught Dennis looking at Helen with an interrogation in his eyes. If Helen answered him in any way, the answer escaped Sarah. It was all so unlike the Hallams, so open, so conversational, so unafraid to talk about themselves and their problems. The next day began badly

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Главная The Skeleton in the Grass. The Skeleton in the Grass.

The Skeleton in the Grass. Much more than a crime novel, The Skeleton in the Grass is an extraordinary piece of fiction that captures the essence of a family that captures the essence of a family and a world on the brink of extinction. With subtlety and skill, Robert Barnard amazes with his versatility and storytelling power. Books by Robert Barnard.

a subtle and nuanced book that deserves to be read as much for its sense of period and probing of motives as for its cleverly managed plot" -New York Times

Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). a subtle and nuanced book that deserves to be read as much for its sense of period and probing of motives as for its cleverly managed plot" -New York Times. the atmosphere of the time has been captured perfectly, and the characters are beautifully delineated in this elegant and compassionate novel" -Toronto Star.

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Much more than a crime novel, The Skeleton in the Grass is an extraordinary piece of fiction that captures the essence of a family that captures the essence of a family and a world on the brink of extinction.

I seem to remember I came down hard on the old boys’ sense of noblesse oblige, but some of them were really rather endearing old birds. Sarah nodded intelligently, thankful that she knew quite a lot about the Dukes of Devonshire. The conversation ranged over books and politics and personal concerns, and sometimes Mr. Hallam talked quietly to Sarah about her background, and the doings in her father’s parish. This last subject was a little embarrassing.

Skeleton in the Grass" is a mystery in same way that "Atonement" is a mystery. Under the pseudonym Bernard Bastable, Robert Barnard has published one standalone novel and three alternate history books starring Wolfgang Mozart as a detective, he having survived to old age. That is, it's a very good novel with some suspenseful elements. Barnard lived with his wife Louise in Yorkshire. Series: Perry Trethowan Charlie Peace. Books by Robert Barnard

Robert Barnard (author). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Robert Barnard (author). Sara Causseley could not be more delighted by her new job as governess to the aristocratic Hallam clan. The children are adorable, the gardens are a dream, and the conversation stimulating. But ominous political clouds are gathering over Europe, and as England slips inexorably toward World War II, the Hallams? political views make the family increasingly unpopular.

Sarah Causley leaves an unhappy girlhood in a quiet English village, joining the pacifist Hallam family, but pre-World War II tensions lead to murder, and she begins to suspect the sad, shocking truth

Riavay
This is a well-written mystery with bits of wisdom and common-sense to offer. Barnard does a good job of making individuals of his characters. He acutely perceives and describes body language. The couple with a fondness for holding childish game-night parties at their house were “innocently excited” and “in bumbling anticipation” of Inspector Minchip’s visit to interview them.

It’s a world apart from our street-wise one. An extramarital romance is felt as having been “an interlude of tenderness.” How different that is from the “relationships” described in modern rap songs.

I also appreciated the presence of an intellectually adult child. The 6-year-old Chloe walks her new nanny through town, informing her about the occupations and personalities of the residents of each house they pass. How different that is from the depictions of modern children whose conversation is usually reduced to a litany of consumer demands.

Readers can also learn something about the issues that preoccupied people in England in the 1930’s – issues we don’t often associate with the politics of the period anymore. Young men were being inspired to go off and fight the rise of Franco in the Spanish Civil War. The Hallam family elders in this story remained pacifist, eschewing military involvement with both Spain and the rising threat from Nazism and Fascism. For that reason, they were often ostracized and subject to nasty little repulses from the townsfolk.

However, author Barnard occasionally gives the impression that he’s just working off one of those “What Happened the Year of Your Birth” cards, running down the list of “most populars” in 1936 – the most popular movie (“Grand Hotel”) and the most popular book (“Angel Pavement”).

There’s not much gore and a minimum of mayhem here. Sometimes the potential threat inherent in the plot seems almost too understated, as when the nanny, in an attempt to keep her young charge calm, describes the finding of a body and a skeleton in the garden bushes as “a spot of bother.”

The author also breaks the narrative flow a bit too much with what are often unnecessary flash-forwards. Then, while the detective’s hypothesis about the “how” of the crime involves clever deduction, the ultimate revelation of the “who” is a bit lame. Nevertheless, this mystery as a whole is quite engaging and is a welcome retreat into the manners of the gentry in a 1930’s English manor house.
Cheber
A young man is found shot to death on the lawn of the country home of the Hallams, a charming family of intellectuals. They are liberals and pacifists in a conservative neighborhood.

We watch events through the eyes of Sarah, an intelligent, engaging young woman who's the new nursery/governess to the youngest Hallam child. She is a bit of a Jane Eyre figure, but very much her own person. She describes the murder to her young charge as “a spot of bother,” knowing it is much more.

The novel is set in pre-World War II England. Time and place are vividly described. Villagers favor the bicycle for transport, although horses are still on use. Cars are a bit exotic and objects of envy. A Greta Garbo movie is at the local theater, and the projector breaks down in every showing! Ultimately the story moves to the war years with Sarah serving as an ambulance attendant in the Blitz. This is when we find out the truth of the murder.

The description of the investigation is riveting. I very much liked Inspector Minchip, an unimpressive looking man who knows what he's about, an excellent judge of character too. The paunchy Sergeant South is also quite likable.

The effect of the murder and investigation on the Hallam family is profound, and makes this something of a psychological novel. The novel also has a sociological aspect. It dramatizes class distinctions in English society – and the great divide between well-to-do intellectuals and ordinary people.

The characters are wonderfully vibrant. I loved dotty Lord Wadhams and his dowdy family. The Hallams are incisively portrayed. And the village Fascist is a gem of a villain.

I absolutely loved this novel. It's a cozy with unexpected depth.
Anarus
"The Skeleton in the Grass" has been well and favorably reviewed and deservedly so. Author Robert Barnard has created an original plot, some characters with depth and interest and a plausible ending. The book successfully evokes pre-WWII England and the social and political environments of the time. There is a good flow to the story and prospective readers might find that they have finished the novel in one sitting (my experience at least).

Good read for cross-country flight.
Alianyau
Though the writting was okay, the ending was disappointing as it totally deceives the reader, and the discovery of the perpetrator comes almost on the last page as though it were an after-thought. I'll be donating this book to my local Goodwill Store.
Early Waffle
Well written with the interest of a historical novel. I very much enjoyed the tension in the storyline presented by the characters being pacifists leading up to the war.
Tygrarad
Shows its age...not in a good way...draggy, heavy handed
Angana
Discovering the rich sharp wit of Robert Barnard will be on my top 10 list of favorite things from this year.