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by Eliot Pattison
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Mystery
  • Author:
    Eliot Pattison
  • ISBN:
    0312335091
  • ISBN13:
    978-0312335090
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Minotaur Books; Reprint edition (April 1, 2005)
  • Pages:
    368 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mystery
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1212 kb
  • ePUB format
    1579 kb
  • DJVU format
    1421 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    585
  • Formats:
    txt rtf lrf lrf


In an earlier time, Shan Tao Yun was an Inspector stationed in Beijing. But he lost his position, his family and his freedom when he ran afoul of a powerful figure high in the Chinese government.

In an earlier time, Shan Tao Yun was an Inspector stationed in Beijing. Released unofficially from the work camp to which he'd been sentenced.

In an earlier time, Shan Tao Yun was an Inspector stationed in Beijing Eliot Pattison is the author of The Skull Mantra, which won the Edgar Award and was a finalist for the Gold Dagger, as well Water Touching Stone. Released unofficially from the work camp to which he'd been sentenced, Shan has been living in remote mountains of Tibet with a group of outlawed Buddhist monks. Without status, official identity, or the freedom to return to his former home in Beijing, Shan finds himself in the midst of a baffling series of events. Eliot Pattison is the author of The Skull Mantra, which won the Edgar Award and was a finalist for the Gold Dagger, as well Water Touching Stone and Bone Mountain.

Электронная книга "Beautiful Ghosts: A Novel", Eliot Pattison

Электронная книга "Beautiful Ghosts: A Novel", Eliot Pattison. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Beautiful Ghosts: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Beautiful Ghosts book. Inspector Shan Tao Yun although released from a work camp in Tibet is still nonetheless considered a persona non-grata in the eyes of many. Attending a ceremony to rededicate an ancient ruined monastery he finds evidence that a murder too place at this revered sites. While imprisoned he aligned himself with monks also sentence to hard labor. Throughout the novel the Skull Mantra we learn more about these monks, Buddhi Beautiful Ghosts.

Eliot Pattison is the author of three bestselling mystery series - The Bone Rattler. Thank you to Baltimore Post-Examiner for presenting an excerpt of my novel, Bones of the Earth: An Inspector Shan Tao Yun Mystery. Bones of the Earth: An Inspector Shan Tao Yun Mystery.

Eliot pattison series: Inspector Shan . A Mystery of Colonial America. After Shan Tao Yun is forced to witness the execution of a Tibetan for corruption, he can't shake the suspicion that he has instead witnessed a murder arranged by conspiring officials.

Eliot Pattison (Joseph Eliot Pattison, b. 20 October 1951) is an American . 20 October 1951) is an American international lawyer and author about international trade, as well as an award-winning mystery novelist. His professional career consists of advising and representing . and foreign companies on international investment and trade issues. He has published five books and more than thirty articles on international topics. Pattison has written two series of mystery novels, set in different time periods and geographic areas. His "Inspector Shan" series of novels is set in modern-day Tibet, and features former Beijing Justice Department Investigator Shan Tao Yun.

Disgraced former Beijing Inspector Shan Tao Yun has been living in the remote mountains of Tibet since . But now there's apparently been a murder in a ruined monastery and the very officials who exiled Shan are after his help.

Disgraced former Beijing Inspector Shan Tao Yun has been living in the remote mountains of Tibet since his unofficial release from a work camp. Without status, official identity, or the freedom to return to his former home in Beijing, he's lived with the forbidden lamas for the past year. But now there's apparently been a murder in a ruined monastery and the very officials who exiled Shan are after his help

Inspector Shan Tao Yun (Volume 4) Eliot Pattison St. Martin's Press. The first Inspector Shan novel, winner of the Edgar Award for Best First Novel and finalist for the Gold Dagger, was a sensation when first published.

Inspector Shan Tao Yun (Volume 4) Eliot Pattison St. In an earlier time, Shan Tao Yun was an Inspector stationed in Beijing. Now, as the series continues with Soho Press, this modern classic returns in trade paperback.

The British woman’s unexpected words about her ancestor stayed with Shan as she escorted him, with Corbett and Lokesh, deeper into the maze of chapels while Khan guarded the others.

The British woman’s unexpected words about her ancestor stayed with Shan as she escorted him, with Corbett and Lokesh, deeper into the maze of chapels while Khan guarded the others enigma, an art thief and humanitarian, partner of Director Ming, cousin of the Bumpari clan, organizer of relief for Tibetan children, and, according to Corbett, a murderer. I can give you a deal, Corbett said in English to McDowell’s back as they walked. Maybe it was Lodi’s idea, maybe you were just duped. If I ask for leniency a judge will listen.

In an earlier time, Shan Tao Yun was an Inspector stationed in Beijing. But he lost his position, his family and his freedom when he ran afoul of a powerful figure high in the Chinese government. Released unofficially from the work camp to which he'd been sentenced, Shan has been living in remote mountains of Tibet with a group of outlawed Buddhist monks. Without status, official identity, or the freedom to return to his former home in Beijing, Shan finds himself in the midst of a baffling series of events. During a ceremony meant to rededicate an ancient and long destroyed monastery, Shan stumbles across evidence of a recent murder in the ruins. Now Shan is being torn between some officials who want his help to search the ruins while others want him to disappear back into the mountains - with one group holding out the tantalizing prospect of once again seeing the son from whom Shan has been separated for many years.

In a baffling situation where nothing is what it appears to be, where the FBI, high ranking Beijing officials, the long hidden monks, and the almost forgotten history of the region all pull him in different directions, Shan finds his devotion to the truth sorely tested. Traveling from Tibet to Beijing to the U.S., he must find the links between murder on two continents, a high profile art theft, and an enigmatic, long-missing figure from history ...in Eliot Pattison's Beautiful Ghosts.


Jonide
I really enjoy the Inspector Shan series. This is the fourth I've read and I've reviewed the other three so I won't go into too much detail as to why. If you are curious as to why I like the series and the author so much, I invite you to read my other Pattison reviews.

I don't think this one is quite as good as the others. It suffers from a little bit of sameness. About the only departure from the formula is that Pattison introduces Shan's son, now a young man and a convict, to the story. At this point, I think Shan should be growing a bit more. He still seems a bit lost for purpose, a knight-errant wandering around Tibet. Maybe more of a Don Quixote with Lokesh as his Sancho Panza.

The plot was rather confusing. It involved stolen priceless stolen Tibetan art pieces, forgeries, a ruthless software magnate with a few too many similarities to Bill Gates, a politically ambitious museum director with visions of the Chinese Politburo in his eyes, and an FBI agent specializing in art heists looking to right a wrong. Add to all that a treasure hunt in a Tibetan monastery labyrinth and it was just too much to keep straight.
Dianazius
This is the 4th book in the Inspector Shan series, and the 5th I've read, and I have to say it is my favorite so far. Pattison does an outstanding job of painting a portrait of old Tibet as it is now being swallowed up by China and the modern world. There is of course a fair bit of idealizing in the descriptions of Tibet and Tibetans, but it makes for a good fantasy none the less. He also does a good job developing a variety of characters (Tibetan, Chinese, British and American), and in the process of slowly building to the conclusion (in his typical fashion the answers unfold steadily towards the end and not suddenly) he weaves a spell that has spiritual depth and charming warmth, and after a slow start is suspenseful enough to keep the pages turning.

So far, in every book in this series there is at least one place where a bit of literary magic unexpectedly unfolds (usually almost unrelated to the main plot), and it is a treat to see how this muse (ancient Tibet) reveals itself through Pattison. The whole series is delightful for fans of Tibetan culture and history, and this book is especially rich in describing the artistic traditions of her past.
Goodman
I mostly read mysteries, and this book and Pattison's other inspector Shan novels certainly fall in that broad category, but are kind of unique. They are a window into Buddhism, Communist China and its thuggery (contrary to the picture painted by its adoring media writers), Tibet, and a different world. They're long books and half the time I don't really understand what's going on, and, unlike most mysteries, the denouement is less important than the trip that one takes getting there. I really do love them.
Malann
There's the mysterious murder, of course, though for a long time the victim is as unknown as the murderer, and the real puzzle is why. But there are other mysteries: the setting, first and foremost--Tibet (mostly), with its lofty crags and dark caves, plus a deep tradition of Buddhist and folkways, all rather exotic to this reader. Then there are the characters, including the Chinese inspector/criminal Shan, plus assorted Tibetans, Chinese, English, and Americans, all bobbing in and out of sight, with a variety of obscure motivations. I found it hard to empathize with any of them. (It would doubtless help to have read some earlier novels by Pattison, for the main characters seem to have significant back stories.) And last, but not least, there is the plot, shifting back and forth across the mysterious landscape. I confess it was hard to follow at times, and I still can't fathom certain twists and details. The author does highlight the murderous imperial treatment of the Tibetans by the ruling Han Chinese, and the exploitation of Tibetan religious artifacts by Chinese and Americans, so his political sympathies are at least clear. Still, I found myself frequently adrift in this book. The author is extremely knowledgeable about things Tibetan and Buddhist, but not as skilled in spinning a yarn.
MilsoN
I was introduced to series a few months ago and am really enjoying -- great insight into the plight of Tibet and Tibetans, as well as humanizing in some instances the Chinese individuals (this is book 3 of series and am seeing more exploration of individual Chinese and enivironment/culture that influences them). Also reminds us of what is constant, how to endure true hardship and many more lessons. Is not preachy, but educational as all of these do have story and bit of intrigue.
Danial
With each book in the Inspector Shan series, my admiration and respect for Eliot Pattison grows. These are so much more than mystery novels. They are meditations on the meaning of life, modern day Purana stories - examples of how to strive toward a compassionate and enlightened self. As a writer, I am humbled by his ability to weave a deep understanding and love for Tibetan culture, in-depth historical research, creative genius, and great wisdom into a written pattern as beautiful as any ancient Tibetan artwork.
Tcaruieb
Shan is back and this book seemed more hopeful and lighter than its predecessors. Reading the Shan series evokes my personal memories and feelings from my own journey through Tibet. I confess I am addicted to Shan stories probably because he has masterfully described some of the most stunning scenery in the world. The oppression he describes is so heavy and so real that even a tourist can feel it. I gave it 5 stars because I really loved it and couldnt wait for the next book despite the clichéd greedy American businessman. In this novel Pattison gives us some reprieve from his usual run of torture injustice and extreme cruelty.
I got a little lost and needed pictures to visualize the scenes of the temples and underground water access. This was a little overwhelming and detracted from my usual enjoyment of Eliot Pattison's books on the Tibetans and Shan, the Inspector apprentice monk.