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by Maureen Sarsfield
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Mystery
  • Author:
    Maureen Sarsfield
  • ISBN:
    0915230550
  • ISBN13:
    978-0915230556
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Rue Morgue Press (July 1, 2003)
  • Pages:
    191 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mystery
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1353 kb
  • ePUB format
    1486 kb
  • DJVU format
    1160 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    859
  • Formats:
    mobi mbr lrf doc


Her two mysteries, Murder at Shots Hall and Murder at Beechlands, feature Inspector Lane Parry of Scotland Yard. I wish she had continued to write because this book shows real talent.

Her two mysteries, Murder at Shots Hall and Murder at Beechlands, feature Inspector Lane Parry of Scotland Yard. Both books were published in the late 1940s and quickly picked up by American publishers, which was unusual for that time. However, after three books, Sarsfield vanished and no one knows what happened to her. Sarsfield shows a knack for setting, plot, pacing, humor, and characterization.

Murder at Shots Hall book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

I remember enjoying Murder at Shots Hall (1945), particularly for its central female suspect, Flikka Ashley, who is a. .

I remember enjoying Murder at Shots Hall (1945), particularly for its central female suspect, Flikka Ashley, who is a sculptor and whom rather steals the lime light from Inspector Parry, though in this novel he is much more the focus. I wouldn’t say there is a female character like Flikka in Murder at Beechlands (1948), with several of the female characters being rather prone to dramatizing things and being hysterical. The characterisation is one of the strengths of this book as Sarsfield shows well how characters cope, or don’t cope, with the strain of the situation of being in an enclosed space with a killer, and I think she captured the group psychology effectively.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Sofia si veste sempre di nero.

Murder at Shots Hall introduces the reader to Inspector Lane Parry

Murder at Shots Hall introduces the reader to Inspector Lane Parry. This story all takes place over a very short time, a matter of days, and every single night the fog came down so that no movement could be seen, so thick that it actually dripped off people. Similar books by other authors.

Murder at Shots Hall. The author, Maureen Sarsfield, is every bit as much of a mystery as two of the three books she wrote

Murder at Shots Hall. Book Format: Choose an option. The author, Maureen Sarsfield, is every bit as much of a mystery as two of the three books she wrote. Her two mysteries, Murder at Shots Hall and Murder at Beechlands, feature Inspector Lane Parry of Scotland Yard.

Murder at Beechlands. by. Sarsfield, Maureen. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Mystery/Suspense, Fiction, Fiction - Mystery/ Detective, Mystery & Detective - Traditional British, Murder, Private investigators. Uploaded by Alethea Bowser on March 5, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014). Maureen Sarsfield published three novels, two of them mysteries featuring Lane Parry, an Inspector with Scotland Yard, in the 1940's. Book in the Inspector Lane Parry Series). by Maureen Sarsfield. My evaluation of this book is somewhat in the middle. The book is very entertaining, but alas, utterly predictable. Both were reprinted in the United States, which was fairly notable for the time.

Author of Murder at Shots Hall, Murder at Beechlands (Rue Morgue Vintage Mystery), A party for Lawty, Green December fills the graveyard. Are you sure you want to remove Maureen Sarsfield from your list?

Author of Murder at Shots Hall, Murder at Beechlands (Rue Morgue Vintage Mystery), A party for Lawty, Green December fills the graveyard. Created April 1, 2008.

Murder at Shots Hall introduces the reader to Inspector Lane Parry.

A post WWII mystery. Murder at Shots Hall introduces the reader to Inspector Lane Parry. This story all takes place over a very short time, a matter of days, and every single night the fog came down so that no movement could be seen, so thick that it actually dripped off people.

Ice_One_Guys
Thanks to enterprising folks at "The Rue Morgue Press", we have a chance to revisit some long forgotten authors. Maureen Sarsfield is not only long forgotten, but there is no clue of what actually happened to her.
Two people offered two completelly different reviews, and gave this mystery 1 and 5 stars. My evaluation of this book is somewhat in the middle. The book is very entertaining, but alas, utterly predictable. Ms. Sarsfield is deffinitely not Agatha Christie, but on the other hand who knows what could've happened if she wrote more than just two mysteries. As it is, it is a charming trifle and deserves 3,5 stars in my humble opinion.enjoyable trip to the times begone.
Jia
This was a good book worth reading.
Jairani
I made myself wait two days before writing this review hoping that I would be able to view this book in a better light but it is just not going to happen. I had originally read the only other review for Murder at Shots Hall before purchasing it and expected that it would be just the perfect cozy mystery which I love so much. I find that I am going in the polar opposite direction from the other reviewer.

This book was originally published as Green December Fills the Graveyard but the title has been changed by Rue Morgue Vintage Press to better define the book within the mystery genre. (For anyone interested in the second Sarsfield mystery it was published as A Dinner for None in Britain and as A Party for Lawty in the U.S. Rue Morgue has retitled that selection as Murder at Beechlands. Just a little information so you will not accidently buy the same book multiple times.)

I did not like this book. I am very irritated with myself because I even finished it but I wanted to see if I had spotted the murderer. I'm also sorry to say that I had but not the reasoning behind that character being guilty. I thought I would scream if I read one more time that Flik was lovely, just lovely, so lovely, really lovely, a lovely woman. Why was she lovely? Surely the author saw something in her imagination which made Flik lovely. Her hair, her eyes, her skin, her figure, her hands, her feet??? What, what, what??? We are just told ad nauseam how lovely she is. And that every man "fell" for her. Once again, why? This story all takes place over a very short time, a matter of days, and every single night the fog came down so that no movement could be seen, so thick that it actually dripped off people. This village was six miles from the sea and yet the salt in the fog stung skin and eyes. Really? Now that's a long way for salt spray to travel. But of course I'm forgetting. Every night these poor people had to endure gale force winds (just to make it more interesting).

This book is so full of stupidity that I could spend all day trying to relate it all. Several examples: (1) The SCOTLAND YARD INSPECTOR told the constable left on the premesis to take his boots off and walk around outside in his socks at about 2:00 am (in the mud, rain and howling wind) so that he would not wake Flik up, she needed her rest! (2)The doctor (who had lived within a three mile radius of Flik for many years but had never met her until the first murder) actually almost balked against going to check up on a newborn infant whose parents thought he was dying because he wanted to go check up on Flik. (3)A broom comes flying out of the air and manages to hit a police constable smack on the head while he is wallowing in the mud (again during all that howling wind and rain) in the middle of the night, in the middle of a muddy road but nobody can figure out where the broom came from and don't even really believe that it happened. I'm telling you, my list could just go on and on.

When push came to shove, Flik was hiding two "dreadful" secrets which she could never allow to be revealed and so was willing to go to prison for murders she had not committed. When the secrets were revealed they were pure piffle! Nobody cared. It's for sure that I didn't.

Detective Sergeant Arnoldson was a truly abhorrent character. So much so that it made no sense for the powers-that-be to allow him to stay on the police force. He had propositioned Flik several years previously for "special favors" after he rescued her from her burning bedroom after a bomb struck Shots Hall during an air raid. (He spotted a military man's mess kit beneath her bed.) She had turned him down and he was resentful and liked to gossip about her and insinuate that she was not a "nice" lady. I got sick and tired of hearing about his red, sweaty face and his wet lips. He also broke the law in his treatment of Flik during the murder investigation and yet his superiors put up with him. Once again, my perennial question is WHY?

Well, now I've vented my spleen and I feel somewhat better. If you still want to buy this book after reading my rants, go right ahead. I bought the book based on one 5 star rating. Now you have an entirely different assessment. Happy decision making!
Gravelblade
Sculptor Flikka Ashley makes a precarious living selling portrait heads and busts carved out of wood, but most of her money goes for repairs to Shots Hall, the war-damaged Sussex family home she shares with her Aunt Bee Chattock. In its ruined state the house couldn't be sold; it's not even historical, only Victorian, and the two women have no place else to live. Even so its spacious rooms suit them better than any cramped modern bungalow they could afford. Along with a tower and a few rooms, the extensive wine cellar and its contents escaped the bombing, so they can sell off a few bottles when extra cash is needed, or give very nice gifts when they wish.

In a stone outbuilding on the property, Flikka works, mainly after dark, on her masterpiece, a sleeping mermaid she is carving from an unusual large sea-green stone she found in Wales. Near the studio is the cottage of the elderly woman who cooks and cleans for the ladies at the Hall. One evening when Flikka drops by, as she always does, to check on the old lady on the way to work on her mermaid, she finds her dead in her chair, with an unusual look on her face that convinces Flikka she has been murdered.

Intriguingly, this writer is a mystery mystery writer. Nothing at all is known of her (or him? my guess -- pseudonym? probably -- American? I wonder), even birth and death dates, except the two mysteries and one novel published between 1945 and 1948. I find the writing awkward and clumsy, the plot unimaginative and uninvolving, the characters unappealing and unpleasant. Could a country policeman really be so entirely without redeeming qualities? How could he keep his job without even trying to conceal his rudeness, crudeness, sexism, and sadism? Even his boss dislikes him.

Flikka, now a youthful 36, married and divorced early. Detective Sergeant Arnoldson thinks this is evidence enough that she is a bad woman and should be in jail (and in his power). He resents the fact that, despite her poverty, she is out of his class and out of his reach. If he can't put her in jail (or have her for himself) then he will be satisfied if he can get her hanged for murder. An unusually silent and unforthcoming heroine, Flikka finds her champions in Dr. Abbot, a disillusioned bachelor (curiously hostile to his patients), and Lane Parry of Scotland Yard, the opposite of Arnoldson, so attractive to women that they all but line up to be arrested by him.

The much coveted and maligned Flikka is characterized only as remote and unattainable, almost too goddess-y to be human; her chief concern is with keeping the secrets of her Past away from prying eyes. The other characters, even the (supposedly) more sympathetic ones, are peevish and sarcastic with each other, or yell and curse, even when there's no obvious reason for it. Mostly they just wish they had never let themselves become involved in this business. That I can understand.

As for the murder plot, it involves the needless sacrifice of a few disposable old people, to no effect. The point is made over and over again that they would have died soon anyway. Most of the actual police work is carried out by lowly Sergeant Congreve on his bicycle, who alone seems to have any idea of a policeman's responsibilities. He's by far the best character in the book, and, really, about the only one a reader can sympathize with.