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by Harry Kemelman
Download Thursday the Rabbi Walked Out fb2
Mystery
  • Author:
    Harry Kemelman
  • ISBN:
    0688033628
  • ISBN13:
    978-0688033620
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    William Morrow & Co; 1st edition (1978)
  • Pages:
    217 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mystery
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1554 kb
  • ePUB format
    1618 kb
  • DJVU format
    1304 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    949
  • Formats:
    mobi docx lrf lrf


For David Small, the rabbi of Barnard’s Crossing Conservative Temple, did not like to prepare sermons, or for that matter to preach them

For David Small, the rabbi of Barnard’s Crossing Conservative Temple, did not like to prepare sermons, or for that matter to preach them. He had begun as usual by laying out paper, sharpening pencils, adjusting the lamp-all to postpone the agony of beginning. He was thin and pale, and sitting over his desk, his shoulders had a scholarly stoop. His thin hair, which was beginning to gray at the temples, did not make him more g, only older.

Books in The Rabbi Small Mysteries (12 Book Series). As is common in the murder mystery genre, it is not great literature

Books in The Rabbi Small Mysteries (12 Book Series). Page 1 of 1Start OverPage 1 of 1. Previous page. 1. Friday the Rabbi Slept Late (The Rabb. arry Kemelman. As is common in the murder mystery genre, it is not great literature. However, unlike most murder mysteries, the 'Rabbi' mysteries engage the reader on several levels by exploring some of the social and political issues of the day, providing some insight into the author's views on Jewish philosophy, and comparing Judaism to Christianity.

How can I get to see him?" asked the rabbi. Lanigan smiled, he titled back in his chair and interlaced his fingers over his belly. Well, if you had a boat, I suppose you could row out there. Or you could hire somebody to take you out there in a launch. Or I could have the police harbor boat take you out there. But I doubt if I would since I don't rightly see that you have any concern in the matter. Rabbi Small related the gist of his conversation with Ben Segal. So, since his mother is Jewish, the boy is Jewish, and as the only rabbi in town-".

What do you mean, sponsor? asked Howard Jonas, the president of the Brotherhood. Get behind the idea and push. Decorate the pulpit collation afterward. But that’s what the Sisterhood does. Yeah, so why shouldn’t the Brotherhood take a crack at it for a change? It will spark things up, the competition. You mean, at the collation, the men would pour the tea? For the women? ‘One lump or two, Mrs. Feldman?’. Cummon! That’s a woman’s job, Henry.

A vicious anti-Semite is murdered and Rabbi Small must defend his congregants from being falsely accused in this . But the town is jolted out of domestic tranquility when Ellsworth Jordon, the town selectman, is murdered.

A vicious anti-Semite is murdered and Rabbi Small must defend his congregants from being falsely accused in this thrilling New York Times bestseller Barnard’s Crossing, Massachusetts, is thriving. Every year, more young couples move to this cozy New England village to raise their families, and many of them join Rabbi David Small’s synagogue. An outspoken anti-Semite, and one of the town’s richest and most powerful men, it seems like everyone had a reason to dislike Jordan.

Small, David (Fictitious character). New York : Fawcett Crest. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio).

Start by marking Thursday the Rabbi Walked Out as Want to Read . One fun moment in the book was when the rabbi's wife showed ingenuity and nerve by doing some undercover detective work on the phone, impressing the police chief

Start by marking Thursday the Rabbi Walked Out as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. One fun moment in the book was when the rabbi's wife showed ingenuity and nerve by doing some undercover detective work on the phone, impressing the police chief. The silliest moment in the book was when an 18 year old reacted to being sent to his room by saying "Oh, stink!" Who says that?!.

The adventures of Harry Kemelman's unassuming hero have been hailed by critics and fans alike. Kemelman is celebrated for his absorbing plots and his warm and knowledgeable depiction of Jews and Judaism. Rabbi David Small must step into action when Barnard's Crossings' most notorious anti-semite is found dead, and several members of his congregation are suspected. The murder victim is a cantankerous curmudgeon who has offended many members of this close-knit Jewish community

Thursday the Rabbi Walked Out. Harry Kemelman.

Rabbi David Small takes a sabbatical from the Barnard's Crossing's pulpit to teach a course on Jewish thought at a small community college. But he soon discovers that all is not as idyllic as it seems behind the ivy-covered walls. Rabbi Small comes out of retirement to solve his final case Retired from his job at the synagogue in Barnard's Crossing, Massachusetts, Rabbi Small now teaches Judaic studies at a Boston college. Thursday the Rabbi Walked Out. Had the murder victim not been such a notorious anti-semite, Rabbi Small might never have become involved.

Barnard's Crossing's chief of police turns to Rabbi David Small for assistance in solving the murder of a much-feared millionaire anti-Semite, and the rabbi applies his Talmudic training and his charming rebbitzin, Miriam, to the case

Barinirm
Like all of the Kemelman "Rabbi Small" novels, 'Thursday the Rabbi..." is a good read. As is common in the murder mystery genre, it is not great literature. However, unlike most murder mysteries, the 'Rabbi' mysteries engage the reader on several levels by exploring some of the social and political issues of the day, providing some insight into the author's views on Jewish philosophy, and comparing Judaism to Christianity.

Reading the 'Rabbi' series is like eating comfort food. Start your immersion into Rabbi Small's world with the first novel in the series--"Friday the Rabbi Slept Late", and then continue through the 'week' (Sat., Sun., Mon., etc.), because each novel includes recurring characters and refers to events from previous novels. In that way you will trace the rabbi's tenure in the congregation and the history of his sleuthing.

There is a formulaic aspect to the Rabbi Small novels that does not detract from the reader's pleasure: Rabbi Small is engaged in a struggle with some members of his congregation over an aspect of Jewish practice, a single murder intrudes upon his rabbinical duties, the murder typically occurs in the first fifty pages of the book, the most prominent suspects (typically members of his congregation) are invariably 'red herrings', the police always have the wrong theory of the case, the rabbi (like Sherlock Holmes) has to solve the case for the police, and the murderer is always a minor character introduced early in the novel and then ignored until the mystery is resolved in the last 10 pages.

Those caveats aside, the Rabbi Small novels are a great read -- try it, you'll like it.
Utchanat
The fact is the rabbi doesn't resort to a pilpul (hair-splitting distinction) in this case. Rather, he employs another Talmudic method of reasoning to identify a killer. He feels compelled to do something; so many Jews in his community have become suspects in a murder case. Since the victim was a rabid anti-Semite, police chief Lanigan naturally looks hard at the man's Jewish contacts. It does seem as if several Jewish people were somehow involved with the victim the evening he was shot between the eyes.

To spice things up, Rabbi Small is in danger of losing his job in this book. It's fun to watch him come to the rescue of the very people who want to oust him.

The plot of this Thursday mystery is especially clever. And the times are especially interesting. Women's Lib is big, and Rabbi Small, a traditionalist, is not exactly politically correct. If that bothers you, you might not be pleased with this particular book. But I find the shabby rabbi so charming, his subtle sense of humor so engaging, and his surprising exposition of Judaic philosophy so intriguing, that I forgive him anything.

I'd suggest reading the Rabbi Small mysteries in order, to follow his rocky rabbinical career, and his complex cases, as they unfold. This is a great series.
Bralore
I love Harry Kemelman's books and the Rabbi Small character. Many would be put off somewhat by the fairly slow start they tend to exhibit and the details of temple politics the rabbi has to deal with but I, not being Jewish, take an interest in learning more about the Jewish customs and beliefs as well as how the local temple works from an operational and organizational standpoint. I found this one very entertaining and a good solid read. Would recommend.
Blacknight
Another good read about the inquisitive Rabbi Small. Interesting discussions regarding anti-Semitism from several different perspectives. I wish there were more days in the week.
Skyway
Rabbi Small discovers surprising clues and help the police chief Lanagan solve murders and mysteries. A different side of crime detection.
Alsanadar
I used to read books in this series, so I thought i'd try another one, but I couldn't even finish it because it is too old-fashioned and dated for me.
Coiwield
This wasn't one of Kemelman's better writings. It was slow and the Rabbi was very disappointing in his chauvinist attitude.
As I have already written before I like the Rabbi Small stories. And their talmudic interpretations are interesting, too. But they always follow the same pattern: A group of people on the synagogue's board want to get rid of him.But after he has solved the crime they change their minds because they profit from the results of his investigations.