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by Mary Griffith,Arthur Griffith
Download 50 Fabulous Places to Retire in America fb2
Personal Finance
  • Author:
    Mary Griffith,Arthur Griffith
  • ISBN:
    1564148491
  • ISBN13:
    978-1564148490
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Career Pr Inc; 3rd edition (February 1, 2006)
  • Pages:
    341 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Personal Finance
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1712 kb
  • ePUB format
    1402 kb
  • DJVU format
    1966 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    150
  • Formats:
    lit doc mobi lrf


Over the past several years, Arthur Griffith has lived all over the United .

Over the past several years, Arthur Griffith has lived all over the United States as a radio broadcaster, an engineer, and a computer consultant. He has authored 12 books, and currently teaches online from his home on the (unpaved) North Fork Road near Anchor Point, Alaska. Occasionally, he may be found directing or acting in local community theatre productions.

An eclectic viewpoint of retirement. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 13 years ago. The authors do a fine job of covering all of the bases and a vast majority of the 50 states in looking at favorable places to retire. They do not come to the table with a predefined viewpoint of what a retired person wants. Instead, they take a "facts in brief" approach to describing each potential retirement destination and let you make your own judgements.

50 Fabulous Places to Retire in America. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Series: 50 FABULOUS PLACES TO RETIRE IN AMERICA. This is the wonderful book for finding the perfect place to retire. You learn about each city's climate, costs, taxes, real estate, crime, culture, recreation, transportation, education, medical care & job market. The overview section is very helpful for getting a feel for the city as well recognizing both its positives & drawbacks.

That's right, all we need is the price of a paperback book to sustain a non-profit library the whole world depends on.

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However, for those adventurous souls who find themselves deliciously intrigued by the notion of going somewhere else after retir Product Details Sales Rank: in eBooks Published on: 2006-02-01 Released on: 2006-01-31 F. .

Free 50 Fabulous Places to Retire in America.

Descargar libros de epub para kobo 50 Fabulous Places to Retire in America en español PDF iBook by Arthur Griffith. Started and will finish one day. Not in collection.

The AARP's Best Places Where to Retire in the . for Healthy Retirement Living. Choosing a cruise ship as the place to retire can have additional benefits such as more socialization, better entertainment, more delicious food, and better service than retirement communities that claim to be the best places to retire. The AARP's Best Places to Retire in the World. Moving to a new destination is part of many retirees' retirement plan, because relocating adds another dimension to a person's life.

Updated and revised to include the top 50 communities in the country, complete with an interactive, searchable CD-rom.

50 Fabulous Places to Retire in America, Third Edition has the answers to one of the biggest questions youll ever ask yourself: Where am I going to live when I retire? For some, the answer is as simple as right here, of course.

However, for those adventurous souls who find themselves deliciously intrigued by the notion of going somewhere else after retirement, or even for those who are only considering a move, this book will prove to be an entertainingand invaluableresource.

With his engaging and congenial style, author Arthur Griffith describes 50 of the most attractive, accessible, and outright fabulous places to retire in the United States: lovely, welcoming, convenient, soul-satisfying, warm, sunny, cold, snowy, desert, mountainous, plains, ocean-front, big-city, small-town, way-out wilderness, or just-around-the-corner locations to call home. The book also includes an easy-to-use, interactive CD containing a wealth of information to make your search that much easier and a lot more fun!

Do you want to raise exotic orchids? Want to breed miniature horses? Want to sit by the ocean and count the eagles flying? Looking for the best country-western town? The best golfing for the money? The most shopping per square foot? How about hunting, fishing, and trapping? No matter how specific and unique your desires are, this comprehensive book covers it all!

And for the more practical reader who needs concrete facts and figures, look no further: From annual precipitation to sample costs of residency, you will find numbers and statistics to warm the heart of the most detail-oriented economist in the house.

Over the past several years, Arthur Griffith has lived all over the United States as a radio broadcaster, an engineer, and a computer consultant. He has authored 12 books, and currently teaches online from his home on the (unpaved) North Fork Road near Anchor Point, Alaska. He lives there with his wife, Mary, and their two cats, Captain Editor and Miss Effie. Occasionally, he may be found directing or acting in local community theatre productions.


Precious
This is a good book - 3* to 4* you call it, regardless of whether it hits your favorites. While not the best, it is a useful addition. However, the book falls short in two areas.

1) It is more of a compilation of facts than it is a guide. You never get a sense of the 'personality' of each place or learn what it would be like to live there. And it is this 'personality' which causes informed people to select completely different towns to which to retire.

2) Some of the fact based data is suspect or confusing. I honestly don't know which. For example, the national averages for crime are listed differently in different places (numbers rounded)...

- total national average: 4325, 2736, 4119, 4532

- national average violent crimes: 348, 331, 496, 702, 398

- national average property crimes: 2459, 4533

To be fair, the authors actually do repeat the same numbers sometimes. But the data for some cities doesn't seem to match other data sources. For example, Scottsdale is cited as having 60 crimes per 1000 people (higher than the national average, assuming we know the average). Published FBI statistics are lower than 60 (?). And Tucson is listed as having "its share of drug traffic and related crime". What is one supposed to do with this incisive insight?!
Ral
The data and information finished for each city seemed to be up to date and useful. The selection of which city were included was just weird. California had only three cities: the old line, expensive Palm Springs, San Diego, and Santa Barbara. On the other hand, Alaska also has three cities: Anchorage, Homer, and Palmer. How Alaska is beautiful and a great place to take an extended summer vacation, but I would think only a few people will want to retire there. It just seemed to be a random selection of cities around the US.

I do not know what was on the CD. The CD software would not install on my computer (Window XP). It seemed to be trying to access/change off limit areas.
Minnai
This is a great book along with others to find a area you might want to retire to. You want to do your homework!
Beardana
Gift
Memuro
I found this book to be useful although it is a little dated but I'm sure most of the information is still relevant. We're looking for active adult (55+) retirement communities; this book is just general and doesn't focus on the retirement communities. Therefore, it wasn't as helpful as I was hoping it would be.
Braswyn
The authors do a fine job of covering all of the bases and a vast majority of the 50 states in looking at favorable places to retire. They do not come to the table with a predefined viewpoint of what a retired person wants. Instead, they take a "facts in brief" approach to describing each potential retirement destination and let you make your own judgements. Each destination's article starts with describing the median home price, percentage of population over 65, closest metro area, population size, and finally a short paragraph describing the "Best Reasons To Retire Here".

Next there is a climate table with Jan./April/July/Oct./Year labeling each row and the average high temperature, low temperature, precipitation in inches, and percentage sunshine labeling each column. All utility costs and companies are listed next. The section entitled "The Tax Axe" shows all state and local taxes and fees including car registration, driver's license, sales tax, state tax, retirement income tax (bonds, stocks, etc.), and property taxes including any senior exemptions if they exist. There is a section on local real estate that includes average price of a 3 bedroom house, average price of a 2 bedroom condo, housing styles, rental market, average rent, communities popular with retirees, and nearby areas you might want to consider. There are additional sections on the local job market, medical care, special services for seniors, continuing education such as local junior colleges, crime and safety statistics, transportation including nearby airports, and a final section entitled "Let the Good Times Roll" which outlines culture, recreation, and special events. Each locale's section concludes with websites, addresses, and phone numbers where additional information can be found if desired.

I really appreciated the fact that there were only eight Florida locations mentioned out of the 50, and that rural, urban, heartland, and coastal destinations were all included. I'm a Texas native that has been transplanted to the east coast, and it seems that the local retirees and soon-to-be-retired on the east coast have a kind of tunnel vision that makes many of them believe that Florida is an elephant burial ground in which they are destined to end up and really causes them to self-limit their choices. Likewise, my fellow Texans seldom think of setting foot outside the state of Texas when they retire and usually wind up spending retirement within 100 miles of where they lived pre-retirement, regardless of their resources. Hopefully, potential retirees from all parts of the nation will pick up this book and realize that there is a big country out there with valid retirement choices in all parts of it.
misery
There are three things tht I really like about this book:

1. He has developed an excellent format for checking out the characterists of a community. Rather you use his recommendations or not, these are questions that you would want to answer about any community in which you are thinking about retiring.

2. He has selected a series of cities that you probably wouldn't think of investigating yourself and done the investigation for you. I mean, who would have thought of Ruston, Louisiana.

There are a couple of things that I think might have been done differently.

1. There is a trend to moving into the city. New York, for instance has excellent transportation, medical facilities, and of course Broadway. As oil for heating and gasoline gets more and more expensive, this may be important.

2. One of his cities is Lafayette, Louisiana. Anyone moving there that isn't being transferred by an oil company or something like that had better like hot, humid and bugs. (I was born a bit east of there.)

Wait, I said that there were three things I liked and only mentioned two of them. The third thing I liked is that he didn't mention where I live. It's a great place, but we have enough people.