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Download Up to Our Eyeballs: The Hidden Truths and Consequences of Debt in Today's America fb2

by James Lardner,Jose Garcia,Cindy Zeldin,Tamara Draut
Download Up to Our Eyeballs: The Hidden Truths and Consequences of Debt in Today's America fb2
Personal Finance
  • Author:
    James Lardner,Jose Garcia,Cindy Zeldin,Tamara Draut
  • ISBN:
    1595582118
  • ISBN13:
    978-1595582119
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    The New Press (March 11, 2008)
  • Pages:
    223 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Personal Finance
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1393 kb
  • ePUB format
    1267 kb
  • DJVU format
    1585 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    923
  • Formats:
    lit lrf rtf lrf


Up to Our Eyeballs book. Up to Our Eyeballs" is a troubling examination of the causes and consequences of this explosive rise in consumer debt

Up to Our Eyeballs book. Up to Our Eyeballs" is a troubling examination of the causes and consequences of this explosive rise in consumer debt. Including a critical look at how the financial industry became the aggressive, hyper-profitable industry it is today, this book also incorporates solutions that will be of real relief to struggling households.

Up to Our Eyeballs book. Myra Batchelder, José Garcia. Jennifer Wheary (Contributor).

Up to Our Eyeballs: The Hidden Truths and Consequences of Debt in Today's America. She is a co-author (with Jos Garcia and James Lardner) of Up to Our Eyeballs: How Shady Lenders and Failed Economic Policies Are Drowning Americans in Debt (The New Press).

Up to Our Eyeballs : How Shady Lenders and Failed Economic Policies Are Drowning Americans in Debt.

Up to our eyeballs by José García, José García, Myra Batchelder, Jose Garcia, Cindy Zeldin, March 1, 2008, New Press . The Hidden Truths and Consequences of Debt in Today's America.

The Hidden Truths and Consequences of Debt in Today's America. by José García, José García, Myra Batchelder, Jose Garcia, Cindy Zeldin. Published March 1, 2008 by New Press.

Foreword by Tamara Draut Published in conjunction with Demos. Up to Our Eyeballs is a troubling examination of the causes and consequences of this explosive rise in consumer debt. A groundbreaking book that debunks the notion that Americans’ personal indebtedness results from profligacy and offers startling analysis and realistic solutions. For the first time ever recorded, Americans owe more money than they make.

Authors: Myra Batchelder Jose Garcia Cindy Zeldrin Cindy Zeldin. more Tamara Draut Jennifer Wheary James Lardner. Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee. Published by New Press, The. Need help ASAP? We have you covered with 24/7 instant online tutoring. Connect with one of our Finance tutors now. ABOUT CHEGG.

by James Lardner, Jose Garcia, Cindy Zeldin

by James Lardner, Jose Garcia, Cindy Zeldin. ISBN 9781595582119 (978-1-59558-211-9) Hardcover, The New Press, 2008. Up to Our Eyeballs; How Shady Lenders and Failed Economic Policies Are Drowning Americans in Debt. by Jos Garca, James Lardner, Cindy Zeldin. ISBN 9781595583819 (978-1-59558-381-9) Softcover, The New Press, 2008.

The essays in this book hold up well and make a worthy contribution. The greatest problem we face today is the growing gap between the richest and everyone else, and the slow but steady decline of the middle class. 2 people found this helpful. The contributors to this book make clear how it is happening, and what should be done to address the problem. I recommend it highly.

At a time when Americans owe close to $800 billion in credit card debt, the myth is that credit cards are primarily financing America’s luxury lifestyles—helping white suburban families pay the costs attached to extravagant homes, luxury cars, and golf club memberships—or helping those who aspire to these lifestyles. Up to Our Eyeballs reveals the disturbing reality that credit cards are in fact the new “safety net,” being used by desperate middle- and low-income families to manage essential expenses.

In the increasingly volatile American economy, where a decline in work-related benefits like health insurance and pensions has accompanied a rising cost of living and increased job instability, consumer debt has become a fact of life for many American families. Up to Our Eyeballs is a troubling examination of the causes and consequences of this explosive rise in consumer debt.

Including a critical look at how the financial industry became the aggressive, hyper-profitable industry it is today, this book also incorporates solutions that will be of real relief to struggling households.


energy breath
This book is extremely ideological - anti-corporate, anti-capitalist, etc. Given the authors' affiliations (Demos - a far left think tank), this is not surprising. The points/arguments advanced throughout the book are one sided and the only time the authors discuss the personal responsibility of individuals for their own debt levels is to excuse it and explain it away.

In contrast, the policy recommendations are (for the most part) quite reasonable and are not terribly ideological. Rather than buying this book, I recommend checking it out from your local library and skipping straight to the chapter on policy recommendations. The chapter on the history of credit is also worth a read.
Road.to sliver
just awful
Hanelynai
I found Up To Your Eyeballs to be a fair, mostly non-partisan, balanced look at our broken financial system. The authors show how credit cards and debt have become the new safety net for middle class Americans. Regulation of credit card firms has been practically non-existent, and they expose how federal regulators have let credit card hawkers get away with a slew of tricks and traps that lure unsuspecting Americans into a perpetual pit of debt. The poor, the sick, the most vulnerable elements of our society get hurt the most.

And it confirms my own experience. I hate MasterCard. They send periodic letters changing the terms of the agreement with such tiny print that I feel exhausted even looking at it. I'm afraid to miss one payment lest they boost the interest rate to something stratospheric. They've kept upping the late fees, and shortening the window of time when payment is due. And I have no control over their rules. They're not honest. They're shady, conspiratorial, hiding in fine print and tricks and traps. It's a mean game they play and I hope I don't get caught up in their net, but it's possible, and I see every sign that the US government has been complicit in the shadiness. But, everybody needs a credit card these days, so I can't slice it up and put it in the garbage.

A big point the authors make is exposing the myth that Americans rack up excessive debt by being greedy and selfish and blinded by consumerism. The truth is that most cases of indebtedness come from the removal of the safety net, such as sickness, divorce, job loss, higher college payments. The mortgage industry, running rampant, encouraged people to buy more housing than they needed with teaser loans and fraudulent loan terms and sleazy hard-to-explain plans like balloon payments, and this worsened the crisis. Throughout, federal government, which has taken it upon itself to be the main economic regulator, was "asleep at the switch" as they rightly point out.

Where I disagree with the authors, however, is with their prescriptions of how to fix the system. They offer a reasonable-sounding Democratic agenda with some helpful policy prescriptions that stand a good chance of being enacted given the recent election of a Democratic president, such as more transparent regulation and a neutral regulatory authority. Still, I feel the problems with America are much deeper than the authors point out -- the political process is broken -- and in my view, the debt crisis is only one symptom of a more serious problem. Other symptoms include rampant partisanship, corruption in Washington, dangerous concentration of power in Washington in the presidency, gridlock, a politicized Supreme Court, rigged re-election rules, gerrymandering, money running everything.

I recommend this well written and intelligent look at the indebtedness problem.

Thomas W. Sulcer
author of "The Second Constitution of the United States"
(free on web -- google title above + sulcer)