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by Susi Dunsmore
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Marketing & Sales
  • Author:
    Susi Dunsmore
  • ISBN:
    0714125105
  • ISBN13:
    978-0714125107
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Univ of Washington Pr; 1993 Edition edition (1993)
  • Pages:
    204 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Marketing & Sales
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1232 kb
  • ePUB format
    1500 kb
  • DJVU format
    1517 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    345
  • Formats:
    rtf doc docx lrf


Good: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears. Post - 1940 Antique Chinese Textiles Textile, Rectangle Nepalese Hand-Woven Rugs, Tableware British Susie Cooper Pottery.

Good: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Binding has minimal wear. Additional site navigation.

Nepalese Textiles Paperback. The book is beautifully illustrated and is a fascinating read

Nepalese Textiles Paperback. The book is beautifully illustrated and is a fascinating read. Great for any textile enthusiast or designer looking for an unusual fabric. 4 people found this helpful.

My friend Susi Dunsmore, who has died aged 90, was an authority on Nepalese textile traditions, which she first recorded in two books, published in her handwritten text, with her own line drawings, Weaving in Nepal (1983), mainly about Dhaka weaving,.

My friend Susi Dunsmore, who has died aged 90, was an authority on Nepalese textile traditions, which she first recorded in two books, published in her handwritten text, with her own line drawings, Weaving in Nepal (1983), mainly about Dhaka weaving, and The Nettle in Nepal (2006). She was born in Charlottenburg, Berlin, to Margarete (nee Hickmann), a telephone operator, and Julius Heinze, a bank clerk. After attending art school in Düsseldorf, in 1958 she was invited to teach at a teachers’ training college in Kuching, Borneo, where she wrote handbooks on art education.

London: British Museum Press, 1993. The main body of Dunsmore's book details and chronicles raw materials, production techniques, and uses of textiles in several of Nepal's ethnic groups. Pp. 204, 100 color and 80 Black and White Illustrations. In her lavishly illustrated work Nepalese Textiles, Susi Dunsmore catalogues the rich varieties of traditional textiles found among the equally varied ethnic groups of Nepal. With a background in both art and museum work, Dunsmore approaches textiles and textile production with an eye to collection, description, and cataloguing.

MA Textiles students Kiren Passi and Anna Duthie were awarded the John Dunsmore Travel Scholarship this year, which .

MA Textiles students Kiren Passi and Anna Duthie were awarded the John Dunsmore Travel Scholarship this year, which enabled them to travel to eastern Nepal for three weeks in February and March. While there, they carried out workshops with farmers, learning the local embroidery techniques and developing applications for a contemporary homeware market. The John Dunsmore Travel Scholarship was established in memory of John Dunsmore, and is open to students studying Woven, Knitted, Printed and Mixed-media Textiles at the RCA.

Publisher: The John Dunsmore Nepalese Textile Trust, 2006. If it is added to AbeBooks by one of our member booksellers, we will notify you! Create a Want.

Susi Dunsmore has travelled into the farthest reaches of Nepal in search of its rich and varied textiles. In the lowland valleys and the Himalayan middle mountains she has recorded traditional techniques, photographed weavers at work, and collected outstanding examples of their craft.Until the 1950s the kingdom of Nepal had little contact with the outside world. As a result, techniques continued in use for over a thousand years and the cloth retained a distinctly Nepalese character. The author has examined manuscripts and stone carvings for the earliest evidence of textiles, and shows, for example, that nettle cloth still made today is praised for its beauty and fineness in the ancient epic of Ramayana.The author illustrates looms and spindles of all types, describes the subtle natural dyes, and surveys the raw materials used. While some of the techniques she has recorded may vanish with fresh influences upon Nepal, new traditions are already developing and she shows the impact which a wider range of colours and yarns, including silk and fibres of the Himalayan Giant Nettle, has made among some weavers as recently as 1993.With 100 colour and 80 black-and-white illustrations.

mr.Mine
This lengthy document of some of the snafus of people that were managing HUNDREDS of millions of dollars of investors' money is a testament to exactly how rare knowledge really is. And how much of a role psychology plays in the market. And how true the adage "Those who do not learn history are doomed to repeat it" is.
Currently, I am living here and find that the behavior of the people here is accurately represented by this work and could have been predicted based on some of the historical evidence that is given by Studwell. It is obvious that he has a good, sharp mind and has paid attention to his subject material.
I've often heard phrases such as: "We Chinese have invented words for every thing because of our long history and we don't need to invent more." Or, "The American government lies to you too, and is just as afraid of a revolution as ours is." And on and on and on. The mentality of the people here is very stubbornly fixated in the 12th century and is not likely to change anytime soon. It is with this understanding that the author goes on to describe the Chinese customs that make this reality possible--even now, people here think that Beijing and Shanghai are the financial capitals of the world because of what the government tells them.
The one weakness of the book is that he doesn't devote a whole chapter to describing the cultural aspects alone. And this was perhaps a conscious decision because the perception of a culture is not reproducible from person to person-- although I will admit that all that he has said has been consistent with my observation. It would be easy to predict what he observes if you could just understand the cultural context in which these things take place.
It might also have been nice if he had drawm some parallels with the nervousness that the Soviet Union created in the USA. (It may be that I am going overboard with my "could've/should've"s, as just the documentation of this must have taken FOREVER. It is mind boggling that one person could find so much and keep SO abreast of what was happening.)
It is prudent to underline several things of which he has a mature understanding:
1. The essence of Chinese culture is FORM OVER SUBSTANCE. So he correctly notes that the government has spent a lot of time on making people believe that they were going to get returns that they weren't. This explains why people will repeat things a large number of times to convince themselves (and others) that it is true.
2. The obsession of this place with control. The government here has to be in charge of EVERYTHING. And, as to the first observation, they will not reveal the full extent of their control.
3. The mechanism by which a lot of the "guan-xi" money is distributed. (The hiring of consultants that are children of government officials who have sway-- or at least seem to.)
4. That nasty little sense of superiority that makes the Chinese destructively delimit everything into a Chinese/ Non-Chinese (and therefore inferior) way of doing things. Effectively, this makes the number of transactions that would take place in a properly functioning market much lower.
5. The extremely poor understanding of basic economics and its confusion with the other "social theater games" that they like to play here. Everyone seems to think that if we just believe it hard enough, then it is true. And most importantly how these wildly inaccurate ideas have been implemented as public policy by a government that is NOT subject to feedback mechanisms.
On the negative side: The documentation of the book was thorough, but it was just TOO MUCH and made the book rather heavy. Also lacking was a more detailed comparison of the parallels of this with Japan. They did some of the same things and went down the same roads that China is going down now--although with much more reliable enforcement of contracts/ transparency. And during the 1980s, the Americans bought right into the things published by Japanese think-tanks set up in the USA and created the same sense of hysteria. But when everything was revealed in time (as it usually is), then people understood the folly of their ways.
But for all his clear writing, most people will probably never even hear of the book. They are going to have to waste investor's funds and learn the hard way.
Gerceytone
A very cogent history of foreign trade and investment in China. However, the later 2/3s of the book is prognostication which, along with every other China commentator's, has proven wildly wrong. He may be correct in the long run, but so far the People's Bank of China has been able to stop the much anticipated demise of the China's growth engine.
Daigrel
THIS BOOK IS AN ABSOLUTE MUST FOR THOSE WHO WANT TO REALLY KNOW WHAT DEALING WITH CHINESE IS ALL ABOUT !!! IT SOUNDS LIKE A FICTION ....BUT BELIEVE ME HAVING LIVED AND WORKED IN CHINA FOR 4 YEARS....ITS ALL TRUE!!! NOBODY CAN EVEN START TO IMAGINE WHAT THESE PEOPLE ARE CAPABLE OF OF WHEN IT COMES TO BEING TREACHEROUS AND STEAL! CROOKING ME WAS EASY BUT ...BOEING!!! ALL INFORMATION THAT YOU ARE NOT GOING TO GET FROM THE MEDIA... DO YOURSELF THE BIGGEST FAVOUR...I HAVE RECOMMENDED IT TO EVERYBODY WHO WAS INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT CHINA AND THE CHINESE!!!
Uylo
Joe Studwell, a British freelance journalist who lived in and reported from China from 1991 until 1999, has written one of the best-informed insiders' books about the Chinese economy in the boom years of the 1990s that is on the market. The book is excellently researched, well documented (60 pages of notes accompany 300 pages of text) and profits from a wealth of experience gathered "on the ground."
The main thesis of the book is that many big Western companies substitute a blurry, optimistic picture of a vast potential market for a balanced view based on hard data. When it comes to China, wishful thinking replaces critical distance and realistic assessment.
One thing that "The China Dream" explains very clearly is the extent to which two economies in China exist parallel to each other. One is the old socialist economy that is protected from change and the market forces. The other is a vibrant, export -oriented economy of manufacturing plants that assemble goods under the management of mostly Taiwanese and Hong Kong companies. The latter is the poster child for China, but the former continues to gobble up the people's savings to churn out the products that the planners want to see. Stripped of the success story of the export-oriented manufacturing companies, China's economy looks like a disaster waiting to happen.
Studwell is not a China-basher. He admires the stamina and determination of the small entrepreneurs in China who manage to hold their ground against a rapacious bureaucracy, the lack of credit from state-owned banks and the dumping strategies of pampered state-owned enterprises.
Earlier reviewers have criticized "The China Dream" as biased and uninformed (no CEO interviews). Having worked in China for three years, my impression is that Joe Studwell has a very solid grasp of the economic and political realities in the People's Republic of China, and that there is no point in listening to the rosy projections of CEOs and foreign luminaries who were "toured about in government limousines and fed an endless diet of spurious statistics"(255).
In a nutshell: This book is absolutely recommended reading for anyone who wishes to work in China or just wants to know what to make of all the praise lavished on a socialist developing country.