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by Michael Pollan
Download In Defence of Food: The Myth of Nutrition and the Pleasures of Eating fb2
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  • Author:
    Michael Pollan
  • ISBN:
    0141034726
  • ISBN13:
    978-0141034720
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Penguin Books; 1st Edition. edition (May 1, 2009)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Marketing & Sales
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1790 kb
  • ePUB format
    1237 kb
  • DJVU format
    1575 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    535
  • Formats:
    lrf mbr lit lrf


By food, Michael Pollan means real, proper, simple food - not the kind that comes in a packet, or has lists of. .

By food, Michael Pollan means real, proper, simple food - not the kind that comes in a packet, or has lists of unpronounceable ingredients, or that makes nutritional claims about how healthy it is. More like the kind of food your great-grandmother would recognize. In Defence of Food" is a simple invitation to junk the science, ditch the diet and instead rediscover the joys of eating well. By following a few pieces of advice (Eat at a table - a desk doesn't count. He also interestingly shows how the food industry plays food science marketing with features such as "added fibre", "added omega3" etc. while ignoring the more beneficial natural sources.

In the second and final extract from his new book, Michael Pollan says we need to rediscover the simple rules for healthy eating. Here, he gives his recipe for reclaiming control over our disastrous diets. The first time I heard the advice to "just eat food" was in a speech by the nutritionist and author Joan Gussow, and it baffled me. Of course you should eat food - what else is there to eat? But Gussow, who grows much of her own food on a flood-prone finger of land jutting into the Hudson River, refuses to dignify most of the products for sale in the supermarket with that title.

In Defence of Food: T.Michael Pollan's last book, The Omnivore's Dilemma, launched a national conversation about the American way of eating; now In Defense of Food shows us how to change it, one meal at a time

In Defence of Food: T.Michael Pollan's last book, The Omnivore's Dilemma, launched a national conversation about the American way of eating; now In Defense of Food shows us how to change it, one meal at a time. Pollan's bracing and Michael Pollan's last book, The Omnivore's Dilemma, launched a national conversation about the American way of eating; now In Defense of Food shows us how to change it, one meal at a time.

By food, Michael Pollan means real, proper, simple food - not the kind that comes in a packet, or has lists . In Defence of Food is a simple invitation to junk the science, ditch the diet and instead rediscover the joys of eating well. By following a few pieces of advice (Eat at a table - a desk doesn't count

In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto (released internationally as In Defence of Food) is a 2008 book by journalist and activist Michael Pollan. It was number one on the New York Times Non-Fiction Best Seller List for six weeks.

In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto (released internationally as In Defence of Food) is a 2008 book by journalist and activist Michael Pollan. The book grew out of Pollan's 2007 essay Unhappy Meals published in the New York Times Magazine. Pollan has also said that he wrote In Defense of Food as a response to people asking him what they should eat after having read his previous book, The Omnivore's Dilemma.

By food, Michael Pollan means real, proper, simple food - not the kind that comes in a packet, or has lists of.

Pollan's book, In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto, released on January 1, 2008, explores the relationship with what he terms nutritionism and the Western diet, with a focus on late 20th century food advice given by the science community

Pollan's book, In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto, released on January 1, 2008, explores the relationship with what he terms nutritionism and the Western diet, with a focus on late 20th century food advice given by the science community. Pollan holds that consumption of fat and dietary cholesterol do not lead to a higher rate of coronary disease, and that the reductive analysis of food into nutrient components is a flawed paradigm.

In Defense of Food shows us how, despite the daunting dietary landscape Americans .

In Defense of Food shows us how, despite the daunting dietary landscape Americans confront in the modern supermarket, we can escape the Western diet and, by doing so, most of the chronic diseases that diet causes. We can relearn which foods are healthy, develop simple ways to moderate our appetites, and return eating to its proper context - out of the car and back to the table. Michael Pollan’s bracing and eloquent manifesto shows us how we can start making thoughtful food choices that will enrich our lives, enlarge our sense of what it means to be healthy, and bring pleasure back to eating.

By food, Michael Pollan means real, proper, simple food - not the kind that comes in a packet. view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook.

This book is a celebration of food. By food, Michael Pollan means real, proper, simple food - not the kind that comes in a packet, or has lists of unpronounceable ingredients, or that makes nutritional claims about how healthy it is. More like the kind of food your great-grandmother would recognize. "In Defence of Food" is a simple invitation to junk the science, ditch the diet and instead rediscover the joys of eating well. By following a few pieces of advice (Eat at a table - a desk doesn't count. Don't buy food where you'd buy your petrol!), you will enrich your life and your palate, and enlarge your sense of what it means to be healthy and happy. It's time to fall in love with food again.

Tcaruieb
I have a medical and science background...so traced references cited....everything checks out. Recently diagnosed with osteoarthritis at age 63 and weight 284 pounds. Read this book the first week of January.....went shopping for real foods the second week of January. Find it satisfying to eat no more than 4 oz of red meat 2-3 times a week....salmon, mackeral, sardines 2-3 times a week....and a couple of days with no meat...just veggie omega 3 sources. Have re-read the book....highlighted...added notes on all pages...and bought 2 more copies for my 30 and 21 year olds...both who grew up in the age of "nutritionism" with all its false information. Following Pollan's common sense advice....paying the extra for organic basic veggies and olive oil. Decided to eliminate all wheat and corn until I loose the weight I've set as a goal.
Five weeks eating 3 meals a day...and by week two much of the chronic 24 hour a day pain was gone and I began walking the elliptical and the woods. Five weeks and 30 pounds lighter....with more energy than I've had in 20 years. Buy this book, learn it, live it, tell your loved ones.
Vit
Well-organized and well-written, this book covers how we got to where we are, buying processed foods labeled with various health claims that are meaningless. We find out about the rise of the nutrition industry and how they’ve led us astray. We’ve all heard that fresh, less-processed is better, but the author does an excellent job of explaining why. Living in Switzerland decades ago, I said, half jokingly with no scientific basis in my head, that the cheese and chocolate was excellent because of happy cows, all roaming the hillsides looking content indeed. The author validates my offhand comment and explains the science behind it. I’ve been buying eggs from pasture grazed hens, for the sake of the hens. The author tells us that the nutrition content of eggs from grass-grazed eggs is vastly different from those of grain-fed hens. I’ve been buying grass-fed beef after cringing at the conditions in El Paso and Central California feed lots after driving past, again for the cows’ sake. The author explains how the meat from grain fed cows is very different nutritionally from naturally grass-grazing cows. Interesting how consideration and care for the animals in our food supply chain dovetails with our own health. This book is a must read for anyone who believes that what you eat effects your health and wants a simple framework for making better eating choices.
Arilak
This book was life-changing for me! I found Pollan's writing style to be thoughtful, clear, and relatable. And I can't tell you how many times "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." has run through my head in the years since first reading it. I appreciate how he challenges so much of what we hear about diet -- every time researchers think they have the key to nutrition or weight loss, something new is discovered to turn it on its head.

The book helped me explore my interest in more traditional diets made up of pure/whole foods, leave behind food-like (and gimmicky) products in the stores, and switch to cooking & baking from scratch. After reading it, I was inspired to buy a grain mill for my kitchen so I could grind my own flour and truly bake from scratch using whole grain flour (and wrote a get-started guide to help others do the same). Being able to control what goes into my food has improved my health and energy. I can't recommend this book enough.

I also like the companion book "Food Rules" Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, which I'd recommend if you want a brief "just tell me what to do" book. But for more detailed information that may help you change your food and eating mindset, "In Defense of Food" is the way to go.
allegro
If you've read other books on food, you'll find this to be written better but not containing much new information. It's as if Pollan took the other information out there and regurgitated it in a more digestible format. Which can be a good thing, if you consider the huge tomes out there that are difficult to read.

Pollan covers baby formula and how it's essentially an experiment (p.32). Techno-foods: "modern cornucopia of highly processed foodlike products." (p.14) Public confusion: "thirty years of nutritional advice have left us fatter, sicker, and more poorly nourished." (p.81) This first section covers monocultures, the industrialized food model, distraction of the real message, and detachment from our food. Pollan seems to be driving home the message that any food that purports to have health benefits really ought to be avoided, that it's "a strong indication it's not really food." (p.2) Later he tells us quite simply to "watch out for those health claims." (p.40) This really got my mental juices flowing and made me consider the counter arguments to that.

The most impactful take-away as I finished was the idea that we really don't need books on what to eat. At one time, he tells us that nutritionism has done us no good, "At the behest of government panels, nutrition scientists, and public health officials, we have dramatically changed the way we eat and the way we think about food [...this] has done little for our health, except possibly to make it worse." (p.40) Gee, that is so inspiring. As a parent, I think I'd rather take this message, with a nice positive spin and which reinforces the message that we're smarter than we think we are, "most of what we need to know about how to eat we already know." (p.13)

He tells us that "seventeen thousand new food products" are presented to us every year (p.133) "Although an estimated 80 percent of cases of type 2 diabetes could be prevented by a change of diet and exercise, it looks like the smart money is instead on the creation of a vast new diabetes industry." (p.136) "Medicine is learning how to keep alive the people whom the Western diet is making sick." (p.135) "Don't eat anything incapable of rotting." (p.149) "Ordinary food is still out there, however, still being grown and occasionally sold in the supermarket, and this ordinary food is what we should be eating." (p.147) Don't eat anything my great grandmother wouldn't recognize as food. (p.148)

This book boils down to a lot of rules for better eating. Some of them, for me, are doable. Some of them are not. What I can adopt is a mesh of several of his uidelines... "eat meals" and "try not to eat alone" and "do all your eating at a table." My great grandmother would think it silly, though, if those were guidelines at all.