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by Jeanie Daniel Duck
Download The Change Monster: The Human Forces That Fuel or Foil Corporate Transformation and Change fb2
Management & Leadership
  • Author:
    Jeanie Daniel Duck
  • ISBN:
    0609607715
  • ISBN13:
    978-0609607718
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Crown Business; 1 edition (April 17, 2001)
  • Pages:
    304 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Management & Leadership
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1756 kb
  • ePUB format
    1909 kb
  • DJVU format
    1118 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    243
  • Formats:
    docx lrf lrf lit


Author Jeanie Daniel Duck cites the human element-how changing the corporate environment makes people feel. This change curve is designed for understanding and managing the human element of the change process.

Author Jeanie Daniel Duck cites the human element-how changing the corporate environment makes people feel. The author presents a five-stage framework for dealing with change called the "change curve. The five-stage process is as follows: · Stage 1: Stagnation.

A Powerful Look at Corporate Change and Why Mergers, Reorganizations, and Transformations Succeed or Fail " best business books of 2001. useful and intelligent tool for coping with the inevitable metamorphoses of business (and life). Miami Herald "Provocative imagery. useful questions for managers to ask themselves

April 15, 2001 By Jeanie Duck

April 15, 2001 By Jeanie Duck. Battling the Monster: The Need to Think and Behave Differently. I have come to know and understand the change monster-my term for all the human issues that swirl around change-both personally and professionally. As a senior vice president with The Boston Consulting Group (BCG), I’ve been involved with many companies going through major change. The Change Curve applies to fundamental change efforts of virtually every kind of entity-nonprofit and charitable organizations; educational and religious institutions; government agencies; community organizations, associations, and clubs; and families.

The Change Monster book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

The Change Monster book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Change Monster: The Human Forces that Fuel or Foil Corporate Transformation and Change as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Change Monster is the first book on the central issue that blows so many change efforts out of the water: the . Jeanie Duck has a voice and style unlike those of any other business book. She introduces her own life into the book and writes with efficiency, informality, humor.

The Change Monster is the first book on the central issue that blows so many change efforts out of the water: the human interactions and emotional dynamics of the people involved. It is also an unusual book about business, one written from the heart as well as the head. The Change Monster has an important tool, the Change Curve, at its core. The Change Monster is a tough-minded but compassionate book about leadership when major changes are demanded: after a merger, when profits are falling or markets being lost.

Author Jeanie Daniel Duck presents an engaging, personal look at the human emotions, conflicts, fears and . Change Monster and Winning at Mergers and Acquisitions both score big time in the areas of change and culture

Author Jeanie Daniel Duck presents an engaging, personal look at the human emotions, conflicts, fears and anxieties that unite to make change difficult. She describes the five stages of the change process - stagnation, preparation, implementation, determination and, finally, fruition. Change Monster and Winning at Mergers and Acquisitions both score big time in the areas of change and culture. But the information contained in both of these books creates a synthesis of change management that when blended together provides extraordinary results.

Now more than ever, business leaders need strong strategies for helping their companies adjust to a changing world. In The Change Monster, business consultant Jeanie Daniel Duck focuses on the central issue that blows so many change efforts out of the water: the human interactions and emotional dynamics of the people involved. In a time when nearly every industry is being affected by mergers and layoffs, Duck's sound advice on dealing with the emotions and fears that accompany large change is just what business leaders are looking for.

The Change Monster examines how to effectively plan for, address, and manage the least predictable and perhaps the most important aspect of a successful transformation. Duck’s experience with change has been widespread and varied

The Change Monster examines how to effectively plan for, address, and manage the least predictable and perhaps the most important aspect of a successful transformation. Duck’s experience with change has been widespread and varied. During an early career running her own consulting practice and more recent years spent as a senior vice president with the prestigious Boston Consulting Group (BCG), she has guided companies all over the world through the mountains and minefields of mergers, reengineering ventures, and strategic transformation projects.

A brilliant, original, and powerful look at corporate change—mergers, reorganizations, transformations—and why it succeeds or fails.The Change Monster is the first book on the central issue that blows so many change efforts out of the water: the human interactions and emotional dynamics of the people involved. It is also an unusual book about business, one written from the heart as well as the head. The Change Monster is a tough-minded but compassionate book about leadership when major changes are demanded: after a merger, when profits are falling or markets being lost. It is also about the discipline and kindness it takes to get the people who report to and depend on you to confront their fears and move on to a new agenda, strategy, or company. The Change Monster is a reminder, through stories and anecdotes, of the essentials of the heart and mind that provide the basis for leadership. It also offers warnings that probably will be heeded only after they have been ignored. How, when you think you have made it clear to people what the new objectives are and how they need to behave differently, you are suffering serious illusions. And how, when you think they are not watching, they are, scrutinizing and often misinterpreting your every move.The Change Monster is also a personal journey. It will take you for a roller-coaster ride and make it clear why you have to muster the courage to take people down to reality before you can lead them back up to success, no matter how brilliant the strategy or plan.Jeanie Duck has a voice and style unlike those of any other business book. She introduces her own life into the book and writes with efficiency, informality, humor.The Change Monster has an important tool, the Change Curve, at its core. Developed from Jeanie Duck’s years of experience working with some of the most important change efforts of our time, it provides a highly practical way to help you understand and deal with “the change monster” —the emotions and fears everyone has when going through major change. It will serve as your compass in making judgments about where, both intellectually and emotionally, your people are in their readiness and ability to execute a new strategy or make a new organization succeed. So valuable is it that a General Electric vice president commented after seeing its five stages: “I feel like someone who’s been suffering for years with an unknown ailment and finally got a clear diagnosis. You can’t imagine how helpful this is.”E-mail your comments about The Change Monster to [email protected]

Jorad
Note for Kindle owners: the book has several great graphical representations that do not show well in the Kindle version. On my Kindle DX they were illegible. I had to buy a used hard copy to be able to read them.

Let me start off simple: I genuinely enjoyed reading The Change Monster. Ok, now that we have that out there, please allow me to explain. Jeanie's book is vastly different from the other books on change management I have read so far. The Change Monster is not a how-to, step-by-step manual on how to slam home a win for any company undergoing change. It's more of a memoir of the good, bad, and ugly side of change she faced while living as a change consultant for the Boston Consulting Group (BCG).

Thankfully, it's a much more than a memoir. The second half of the title tells you exactly what it is about: the human forces that fuel or foil corporate transformation and change. It's about the people side of change, not the Gantt Chart side of change management. If what you seek is a flow chart, put the book down and look elsewhere.

In The Change Monster, the author shares her five-step process flow with us as both a foundation and roadmap for her methodology. She calls it "The Change Curve" which, coincidentally, is the outline for the book. The phases are: Stagnation, Preparation, Implementation, Determination, and finally Fruition. Anyone who has participated in a major transformation will easily understand and appreciate her terms. Each phase is clearly described, with multiple examples of people (remember, it's about the people) in companies struggling well, and not so well, move forward, stall, go backwards, survive, or quit altogether and revert to their old systems.

I perceived no arrogance on the part of the author and found her to be humble in her storytelling - she shares much about her failures and missteps. I have never met Jeanie Duck, but after reading her book I imagine she's a great person, someone I'd certainly like to know. She seems very personable, professional, and interesting. Not sure if my perception is accurate, but that's how she comes across in the book.

In addition, at no point did I perceive this to be plug for BCG services. In fact, throughout the book I thought she was extremely generous in her ideas, strategies, and tips for how to work with people through the change process. She gives a lot of insight away that anyone could test in their business; the book is jam-packed with great lessons she learned over the years.

Regarding change, some make it. Most do not. The consensus is that ERP/CRM change initiatives have a 70-80% failure rate. Even when you hire a BCG, McKinsey, IBM, etc. Insane, right? And yet we still trudge forward in our need to stay ahead (or catch up) to our competition. So if we know we must constantly move forward AND we know that our chances of success are really low, isn't the best strategy to learn from others mistakes and not make the same ones? That's wisdom. This book has a lot of it. Read The Change Monster if you want a higher chance of success in your initiative. Couple it with other great resources, including Jeff Hiatt's book ADKAR (they map well together), and you will have a strong understanding about the people side of change. Highly recommended!
Little Devil
Jeanie's dissected testimonials provide a straightforward game board map that can be easily identified in one's own enviornment. Her nuggets of practical advice are useful tools to anticipate and prepare strategies for guiding our teams through the change monster's turbulent waters.
Wishamac
This book is great! It is easy to read and understand. It really helps you with the changes you might need to make in your organization and figure out why people act the way they do. This will prepare you for these reactions and how to handle them.
Kelenn
First, this book lists all the author's successes in great detail, but wants to only provide wooly and rather meaningless references to her failures or those clients who are hopeless. Where is the point in that - how can we learn from faults and her insights on poor strategies that we cannot cross reference to our own experience of these firms.
Second, the first 40 or so pages are good - stagnation area is very good - but the rest is her successes without much value being added to the reader looking for wisdom.
Nten
Practical model for planning and leading change. Effectively addresses factors often overlooked in change until resistance is overtaking successful implementation.
Risinal
the book came in a timely manner. i have not had time to read any of it yet but will get to it on my next day off.
Agantrius
Many organizations change. Most try and plan it. Many fail. Many mergers and acquisitions fail to deliver as expected. Why?

Author Jeanie Daniel Duck cites the human element-how changing the corporate environment makes people feel. The author presents a five-stage framework for dealing with change called the "change curve." This change curve is designed for understanding and managing the human element of the change process. The five-stage process is as follows:

· Stage 1: Stagnation. This is the time that the organization can be depressed or demoralized. There is a general slowness, difficulty in making decisions, and a general lack of motivation.

· Stage 2: Preparation. Leaders of the change must accomplish the aligning and energizing of management around the corporate strategy and vision; articulating and detailing the plan; and generating a healthy dissatisfaction with the ways things are allowing for a genuine appreciation for change to come from within the workforce

· Stage 3: Implementation. Here the leader's ability to manage the expectations, experience and energy of the company is critical to the success of the implementation. The author recommends four methods to start this phase: test and deploy, build behavior first, use attraction to convert, and plan replication.

· Stage 4: Determination. This phase, marked with conflicts, clashes, failures, and minor successes, is only as successful as the degree to which top management stays involved and focused.

· Stage 5: Fruition. This stage is when the change is in place. This is a time to reward employees for their hard work. The company needs to move forward to avoid re-entering a period of stagnation.