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by Patrick Lencioni
Download Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide for Leaders, Managers, and Facilitators fb2
Management & Leadership
  • Author:
    Patrick Lencioni
  • ISBN:
    0787976377
  • ISBN13:
    978-0787976378
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (March 10, 2005)
  • Pages:
    156 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Management & Leadership
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1250 kb
  • ePUB format
    1323 kb
  • DJVU format
    1424 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    862
  • Formats:
    docx txt lrf azw


In reading through Lencioni's book, I thought that he did an excellent job achieving his goal of summarizing the five dysfunctions of a team and then giving practical advice on how leaders can help their teams overcome these dysfunctions.

In reading through Lencioni's book, I thought that he did an excellent job achieving his goal of summarizing the five dysfunctions of a team and then giving practical advice on how leaders can help their teams overcome these dysfunctions. It is obvious that Lencioni has incredible knowledge and experience working with teams and it showed in this book.

Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide for Leaders, Managers, and Facilitators. In this stunning follow-up to his best-selling book, The Five Temptations of a CEO, Patrick Lencioni offers up another leadership fable that's every bit as compelling and illuminating as its predecessor. This time, Lencioni's focus is on a leader's crucia. The Three Signs of a Miserable Job: A Management Fable About Helping Employees Find Fulfillment in Their Work.

A practical follow up to Patrick Lencioni’s Five Dysfunctions of a Team. This book can be read by spectlist in team building Team leaders and mangers, more then any other readers. If that book defines the problem, these are the solutions. Trainers, coaches and leaders will find this a treasure trove of exercises to build and mature teams. Feb 13, 2019 Craig Childs rated it liked it. This slim field guide is the follow-up to the author’s best-selling business book The Five Dysfunctions of a Team.

On the bookshelvesAll. Lean & agile development.

Patrick Lencioni is president of The Table Group, a San Francisco Bay Area management consulting firm, and he is. .

Patrick Lencioni is president of The Table Group, a San Francisco Bay Area management consulting firm, and he is the author of several best-selling books. Learn more about Pat and his firm at ww. ablegroup. Patrick Lencioni, in his book, Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide for Leaders, Managers, and Facilitators, gives a detailed easy to follow plan on how to overcome the dysfunctions that many teams face. Lencioni says that teamwork is what is often missing from teams that are successful and then goes on to identify the five dysfunctions that many teams face.

Электронная книга "Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide for Leaders, Managers, and Facilitators", Patrick M. Lencioni. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iO. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide for Leaders, Managers, and Facilitators" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

PREVIOUS SALES: Lencioni's The Five Dysfunctions of a Team has sold over 1700 copies into the college channel

PREVIOUS SALES: Lencioni's The Five Dysfunctions of a Team has sold over 1700 copies into the college channel. In addition The Five Dysfunctions has sold over 300,000 net copies and has been on the BusinessWeek bestseller list for 22 months, and has also appeared multiple times on the Wall Street Journal bestseller list. PRACTICAL FORMAT: The first Lencioni book to take a more practical, hands-on approach (responding to reader and client requests), describing how to implement the ideas in The Five Dysfunctions of a Team. Potential to sell with 5 dysfunctions book as a set.

Publisher: Jossey-Bass. In the years following the publication of Patrick Lencioni's best-seller The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, fans have been clamoring for more information on how to implement the ideas outlined in the book. Release Date: March 2005. In Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Lencioni offers more specific, practical guidance for overcoming the Five Dysfunctions-using tools, exercises, assessments, and real-world examples. He examines questions that all teams must ask themselves: Are we really a team? How are we currently performing? Are we prepared to invest the time and energy required to be a great team?

In Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide, best-selling author Patrick Lencioni offers more .

In Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide, best-selling author Patrick Lencioni offers more specific, practical guidance for overcoming the Five Dysfunctions-using tools, exercises, assessments and real-world examples. The Five Dysfunctions of a Team outlines the root causes of politics and dysfunction on the teams where you work, and the keys to overcoming them. Counter to conventional wisdom, the causes of dysfunction are both identifiable and curable. However, they don't die easily.

In the years following the publication of Patrick Lencioni’s best-seller The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, fans have been clamoring for more information on how to implement the ideas outlined in the book. A In Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Lencioni offers more specific, practical guidance for overcoming the Five Dysfunctions-using tools, exercises, assessments, and real-world examples. Are we prepared to invest the time and energy required to be a great team?A Written concisely and to the point, this guide gives leaders, line managers, and consultants alike the tools they need to get their teams up and running quickly and effectively.

In the years following the publication of Patrick Lencioni’s best-seller The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, fans have been clamoring for more information on how to implement the ideas outlined in the book. In Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Lencioni offers more specific, practical guidance for overcoming the Five Dysfunctions—using tools, exercises, assessments, and real-world examples. He examines questions that all teams must ask themselves: Are we really a team? How are we currently performing? Are we prepared to invest the time and energy required to be a great team? Written concisely and to the point, this guide gives leaders, line managers, and consultants alike the tools they need to get their teams up and running quickly and effectively.

Moonworm
Abstract

Patrick Lencioni, in his book, Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide for Leaders, Managers, and Facilitators, gives a detailed easy to follow plan on how to overcome the dysfunctions that many teams face. Lencioni says that teamwork is what is often missing from teams that are successful and then goes on to identify the five dysfunctions that many teams face. The five dysfunctions are the absence of trust, fear of conflict, lack of commitment, avoidance of accountability, and finally inattention to results. These five dysfunctions lay the foundation for his book as he explores each dysfunction and gives practical help on how the dysfunctions can be corrected and the team can achieve a healthy status.
The first dysfunction, absence of trust, is the foundation of a healthy team. Lencioni says, “I’ve come to one inescapable conclusion: no quality or characteristic is more important than trust.” For trust to be achieved within a team than leaders and team members must be vulnerable about their weaknesses, fears, and failures. The author goes on to give case studies of teams that lacked trust in their organization and how these teams achieved trust. Lencioni believes that team members need to reveal personal aspects of their lives so that other team members can better understand each other and put their guards down. As with all the five dysfunctions, the book gives great practices that can help teams accomplish trust.
The second issue that teams must deal with is mastering conflict. It is important to know that mastering conflict can only be accomplished after trust is established. Conflict, as described by Lencioni, as “productive, ideological conflict: passionate, unfiltered debate around issues of importance to the team.” Conflict can be difficult for some but “if team members are never pushing one another outside of their emotional comfort zones during discussions, then it is extremely likely that they’re not making the best decisions for the organization.” If a team is going to overcome this dysfunction than the leader of the team at times needs to mine for conflict.
The third dysfunction is the lack of commitment. To achieve commitment there most be clarity in what the team is trying to accomplish; this does not mean that everyone on the team must agree but rather be committed to the decisions made, even when they do not agree. Team members are committed because they believe in the bigger purpose or mission of the organization rather than every decision that is being made.
Avoidance of accountability is the fourth dysfunction that teams face. In order to overcome this dysfunction team members must embrace accountability, defined as “the willingness of team members to remind one another when they are not living up to the performance standards of the group.” This means that team members are willing to have difficult conversations with other team members that are not pulling their weight for the good of the organization.
Focusing on results is how the final dysfunction is overcome. Teams need to be results-oriented and have a clear measurement of success. When teams understand what success looks like they can avoid distractions, such as ego, career development, and money. Lencioni suggest a visual scoreboard so employees will focus on the right tasks.
The third and fourth sections of the book give practical help to better flesh out how teams can achieve a healthy status. Section three answers common questions that many teams have after reading the book The Five Dysfunctions of a Team. The fourth section of the book gives very detailed tools and exercises for a team to use to overcome each dysfunction.

Concrete Response

As Lencioni began to unpack the importance of building trust among team members I was reminded about a time in the life of our staff where there was vulnerability which increased the level of trust. Lencioni said, “when team members reveal aspects of their personal lives to their peers, they learn to get comfortable being open with them about other things. They begin to let down their guard about their strengths, weaknesses, opinions, and ideas.” Over the past year at least once a month we have been “huddling” our staff. During a huddle, we don’t talk about the business of our church, but rather we share about what God is teaching us and how we are personally doing as leaders. These huddles started out very slow, and there was never anything that was shared that was deep or vulnerable. Weeks and even months went by of surface level sharing; we did not have a foundation of trust. It all changed when one of the quieter members of our teams spoke up and started sharing about the difficulties he and his wife were having with one of their children. Fred, the quiet staff member, was struggling with his youngest son being diagnosed with a severe case of autism. Fred, a very smart individual, shared about his inadequacies as a father and how he just felt hopeless, not knowing what to do. As Fred tearfully shared everyone’s heart in the groups went out to him and there was a time of encouragement and prayer for Fred. This transparency moved our group to a deeper level and more people began sharing intimate details of their lives. While Fred’s intentions were not to increase the level of trust within the group that is exactly what he did. Fred unknowingly helped our team move one step closer to being a healthy group.

Reflection

In reading through Lencioni's book, I thought that he did an excellent job achieving his goal of summarizing the five dysfunctions of a team and then giving practical advice on how leaders can help their teams overcome these dysfunctions. It is obvious that Lencioni has incredible knowledge and experience working with teams and it showed in this book. I not only enjoyed the concepts listed in this book but I also enjoyed the writing style of Lencioni and his attention to detail and practical information.
While I found the book simplistic and easy to follow, I noticed that the book lacked concrete data or studies that help strengthen the author's argument. While I understand the five dysfunctions that Lencioni lists, he doesn't give any empirical evidence to show that these dysfunctions are the main culprits for an unhealthy team. The argument in this book could have been strengthened if the author would have done more research, polls, and studies and not make conclusions only based on his personal experience.
I am also under the assumption that Lencioni's expertise is working with corporate America. In many of the examples and case studies, he shares about CEO's and other high-level executives. While I appreciate his willingness to work with these top executives, I would have appreciated more examples within the non-profit world. I have a small staff team that I lead but a majority of my time is spent working with volunteer teams. It would be helpful to see some practical example of how to overcome the five dysfunctions within a volunteer team.

Action

The first dysfunction, building trust within the team, was the first area where I realized that I needed to take action. In talking about how you can build trust in teams, Lencioni says, “providing team members with common vocabulary for describing their differences and similarities, you make it safe for them to give each other feedback without feeling like they’re making accusatory or unfounded generalizations.” He goes on to recommend completing a profiling test with each team, such as the Myers-Briggs test. About a month ago one of our other team members asked if we could take the Myers-Briggs test as a staff. I didn’t see the need for it, plus I noticed that there would be a substantial cost for all of our team members to take the assessment. After reading through this book, I now realize that this assessment could help our team establish trust and better understand one another. The plan after reading this text is to hire someone who can administer the test to our team and then review the results with everyone; fortunately, we know someone who is trained in this material. I believe that once the team takes the assessment we will better understand each other and it will build trust among our team members. The plan is to have all our staff members complete this assessment by the end of April.
The second action that I need to implement into my life deals directly with the dysfunction of lack of commitment. While I believe that for the most part our staff is on board with the mission and vision of our church, we don’t do a great job at clearly measuring success. One of the ways Lencioni creates clarification is by creating a visual scoreboard that is a regular reminder of what the team is trying to accomplish. In addition to the visual scoreboard, Lencioni also suggests that you spend the last five minutes of a meeting asking the question: “What exactly have we decided here today?” By asking this question, the team is forced to communicate with each other until everyone is one the same page. I plan on using both the visual scoreboard and the commitment clarification exercise with our staff to help everyone be committed to what God has called our church to do. I will attach a large white board on our conference room wall. On the top right-hand corner, we will weekly track our attendance, number of guests, salvations, and baptisms. These numbers will be updated weekly and be a visual reminder of our mission, “to reach people far from God and lead them to become followers of Jesus.” On the same whiteboard after every staff, elders, and volunteer meeting I plan on asking the question, “what exactly have we decided here today?” In addition, to answering this question I would also like to answer the question, “in light of the decisions that were made, what is everyone going to do?” This not only clarifies expectations but also clarifies what everyone is going to do based on the information that was decided in the meeting.
santa
This version of the original book lives up to its name as a "field guide". As I read the book, I couldn't help but think of "my team", which is where this book hits the mark. I could actually see my teams strengths, as well as opps for growth AS I READ THE BOOK! I even facilitated one of the exercises with my team today with profound results and productive conversation.

The ONLY reason I did not give this a 5th star is because I would have preferred just a little more substance. Not that I wanted to read a 400 page volume on the subjects addressed, it seemed however, as if the content was forced to fill the space it did. This could have been an 80 page book easily. Additionally, some of the guidance offered seems a bit obscure in places and points to further study elsewhere which I would have preferred in the book itself. Furthermore, the couple of external links I clicked on for further research led to the home pages of cites listed rather than the direct page/resource I was looking for.
Freaky Hook
The Field Guide is a disappointing addition to the book. Does not provide very much good additional content in my opinion. Look for more of a roadmap to take with my team when I purchased this. What I got was (at least what I felt like I got) were the author's footnotes from the original book.
Andromathris
First, if you are looking for something to help your team that is more of a task based team you may want to look elsewhere. As the workbook says, this book is directed toward management teams. The book uses a fictional example to teach its lesson, meaning you are reading a story and learning the technique at the same time. I found I was not able to put the book down and read the whole thing in one sitting. In the end, I was able to explain the basic principles to others because they stuck with me. I find the story approach is much easier to follow and then retain then if I had tried to read a textbook or "how to".

Kudos to the author on this one!
Daigrel
I only review business books, because fiction and literature, I believe, is subjective and a personal choice. That said, this is a must have in your professional arsenal. It ties easily into other organizational development programs. It is a great tool when developing change or performance management plans.
Trex
My husband's boss at his work had all his employees reading this book. He learned a lot from it & would recommend it to everyone. Whether you're a boss or an employee, there's a lot to learn from it in regards to being successful working with people. I read it too & it has helped me in many ways too.
Coiriel
Great book. We asked everyone on our team to read the original book. Using this guide, we then created and conducted a full-day seminar centered around it. It was very well received, gave us a common language to use and helped us address some smaller issues that everyone was aware of but not comfortable discussing.
The book was about 1/3 info and the other 2/3's repeating the same exact words and examples over and over. Some good info - but not a great value.