» » Rapid Results!: How 100-Day Projects Build the Capacity for Large-Scale Change

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by Ron Ashkenas,Robert H. Schaffer
Download Rapid Results!: How 100-Day Projects Build the Capacity for Large-Scale Change fb2
Management & Leadership
  • Author:
    Ron Ashkenas,Robert H. Schaffer
  • ISBN:
    0787977349
  • ISBN13:
    978-0787977344
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (October 5, 2005)
  • Pages:
    272 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Management & Leadership
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1441 kb
  • ePUB format
    1952 kb
  • DJVU format
    1484 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    171
  • Formats:
    docx lrf doc mobi


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The book offers hope for those who really want to change.

That, and the tight time pressure, keeps people moving ahead instead of wallowing in complex processes. -A. D. Pete Correll, chairman and chief executive officer, Georgia-Pacific. The book offers hope for those who really want to change. It provides sound principles that can be adapted and applied by any leader who faces the challenge of getting things done.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on November 11, 2015.

Schaffer, Robert H; Ashkenas, Ronald N. aut; Books24x7, Inc. Publication date. Organizational change, Organizational effectiveness. San Francisco, Calif. Books for People with Print Disabilities. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

At the same time, it ishelping to build the capacity of our organization to l change

Written by Robert . chaffer. At the same time, it ishelping to build the capacity of our organization to l change. -Martha Marsh, president and CEO, Stanford Hospital and Clinics,Palo Alto, California.

How 100-Day Projects Build the Capacity for Large-Scale Change. by Ron Ashkenas and Robert H. Schaffer. Schaffer and Ashkenas flatly deny that you need to make any trade-off between short-term gains and long-range organizational capabilities.

Schaffer and Ashkenas specifically outline the concept behind 100-day projects and show you how to.

How 100-­Day Projects Build the Capacity for Large-­Scale Change by Robert . lessons about managing change

How 100-­Day Projects Build the Capacity for Large-­Scale Change by Robert H. newSpecify the genre of the book on their own. Author: Robert H. No user reports were added yet. Be the first! Send report: This is a good book. lessons about managing change.

Rapid Results! shows how to make large-scale changessucceed  by using 100-day results-producing projects todevelop this vital implementation capability. Written by Robert H.Schaffer, Ronald N. Ashkenas, and their associates—leaders inthe field of change management—Rapid Results!describes an approach that has been field-tested by realorganizations of every size and description to improve performanceand speed the pace of change.

Rapid results projects produce results quickly, introduce newwork patterns, and enable participants to learn a variety oflessons about managing change. Step by step, the book describes howthe use of rapid-cycle, or 100-day, projects   will multiplyyour organization’s power to succeed at large-scale change.Schaffer and Ashkenas specifically outline the concept behind100-day projects and show you how to

Set up the architecture to implement rapid resultsprojectsImprove operational performance and also attain hard results inthe soft areas of managementBuild rapid results into major organizational change such asreorganization, acquisition integration, and internationaldevelopmentUse rapid results to drive leadership development and culturechange

Walianirv
With relevant examples, the authors lay out a reasoned argument asserting that big fix, multi-year change initiatives (think, ObamaCare)don't work. Why? Because every organization is wired together by thousands, if not tens of thousands, of micro-connections that are not visible to the initiators of big-fix projects. When a big-fix, top-down, change/improvement initiative is launched, these micro-connections are disturbed and unintended consequences begin to occur -- consequences that the big-fix initiators are ill-prepared to manage -- so the initiative fails. Failure results from the inability to execute in the face of the multiple disconnects of the unseen micro-connections. If you saw Mickey Mouse as the sorcerer's apprentice in Fantasia contending with the multiple water-carrying brooms, you get the picture.

The solution? Forget big-fix, long cycle projects. Instead, launch one or more 100-day fast response projects, some of which run concurrently, whose purpose is to attempt to achieve something that can be done in 100 days (that eliminates a lot of projects!)and, taking on an experimental mindset, succeed fail, fail fast, but above all, learn fast. Among other things, a learning organization learns to implement and develops leaders, both present and future, who have cut their teeth on executing successfully. Because a 100-day project works in such a small organizational area, it will likely detect the micro-connections it disrupts and develop sensible work-arounds -- something the big-fix architects and managers don't have the capacity to do in their multi-year big change transformations.

I recommend as companion reading the HBR article "Why Good Projects Fail Anyway", which can be purchased online, and the book The Lessons of Experience,Lessons of Experience : How Successful Executives Develop on the Jobwhich tells how managers learned to execute when given almost impossible tasks.
Brazil
Right on!
Axebourne
When business or other organizational leaders have a major problem to deal with they tend to look for big, grandiose solutions - wholesale business process reengineering, major mergers and acquisitions, or wholesale reorganizations. These approaches more often than not fail. Why? Because they impose excessive change on an organization that is not prepared to absorb that type of impact. Instead, what leaders should do is adopt the Rapid Results approach. What this approach does is take discrete, bite sized yet meaningful challenges and take them on with the staff that exists. Leaders, with the help of their staff, including management and line, identify problems that need to be fixed, set measurable performance goals that push beyond the usual performance and aim to accomplish this within 100-days (give or take). What this does is give the group that is working on the goal something realistic to aim at, not some vague pie-in-the-sky future vision. In turn, by working on these goals with existing resources and a relatively tight time frame, group and individual creativity is triggered as well as learning how to problem solve and a myriad of other management and personal skills that may be taught in school but only really learned in the trenches. What this does is build organizational capacity for future change as well as leadership skills among staff. In addition, ongoing, multiple rapid results projects can both guide long-term strategy as well as support existing strategic goals. What Schaffer and his colleagues have done is taken the resources that groups typically tap into during a crisis - cross-functional cooperation, willingness to try new things, time pressure, etc. - and adapted them to the longer term management environment. I have seen this work first-hand in the public sector. All leaders should read this book before they engage a consulting firm for millions of dollars and many years for poor or no results.
Xanna
Authors and consultants Robert H. Schaffer and Ronald N. Ashkenas address their book to leaders who face the challenge of making rapid changes in their organizations - especially to those who know they need to move performance to a higher level, yet are too impatient to execute large-scale change. Schaffer and Ashkenas flatly deny that you need to make any trade-off between short-term gains and long-range organizational capabilities. They offer advice about such changes as new information systems, research and development, product innovation, mergers and acquisitions, and even the use of rapid-results projects in developing countries. Essentially, they take a step-by-step approach to building your organization's ability to achieve short-term change with long-term impact. Despite the authors' occasional self-promotional moments, we find that they offer solid, worthwhile information for CEOs, project managers and other executives.