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by Erik Brynjolfsson
Download Wired for Innovation: How Information Technology Is Reshaping the Economy (The MIT Press) fb2
Management & Leadership
  • Author:
    Erik Brynjolfsson
  • ISBN:
    0262013665
  • ISBN13:
    978-0262013666
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    The MIT Press (September 11, 2009)
  • Pages:
    176 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Management & Leadership
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1587 kb
  • ePUB format
    1566 kb
  • DJVU format
    1851 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    517
  • Formats:
    azw mobi lrf lit


Erik Brynjolfsson and Adam Saunders tackle the issue of information technology's impact on the economy in this book. The book's title is misleading, as this book is NOT about innovation, so people looking to read up on the subject should give this book a pass.

Erik Brynjolfsson and Adam Saunders tackle the issue of information technology's impact on the economy in this book. Instead this book is intended to "provide a guide for policy makers and economics who want to understand how information technology is transforming the economy.

They argue that the turnaround in productivity reflects the delayed effects of the massive investments in business processes accompanying the large technology investments since the late 1990s.

In Wired for Innovation, Erik Brynjolfsson and Adam Saunders describe. Brynjolfsson and Saunders go on to examine the real sources of value in the emerging information economy, including intangible inputs and outputs that have defied traditional metrics.

In Wired for Innovation, Erik Brynjolfsson and Adam Saunders describe how information technology directly or. .

In Wired for Innovation, Erik Brynjolfsson and Adam Saunders describe how information technology directly or indirectly created this productivity explosion, reversing decades of slow growth. Established in 1962, the MIT Press is one of the largest and most distinguished university presses in the world and a leading publisher of books and journals at the intersection of science, technology, art, social science, and design.

In Wired for Innovation, Erik Brynjolfsson and Adam Saunders describe how information technology directly or indirectly . A wave of business innovation is driving the productivity resurgence in the .

Wired for Innovation book. In Wired for Innovation, Erik Brynjolfsson and Adam Saunders describe how information technology directly or indirectly created this productivity explosion, reversing decades of slow growth. They ar Two experts on the information economy explore the true economic value of technology and innovation.

3 1 Technology, Innovation, and Productivity in the Information Age In.

A pack of cigarettes cost 15 cents, a bottle of Coca- Cola 5 cents, and a dozen eggs 50 cents. Source: Brynjolfsson, McAfee, Sorell, and Zhu create value in the coming decade.

This chain of events shows how complex the world is today Push decisions down to the edge of the organization, where information is the freshest and most salient: the cash register, the production line, the call center, and sales reps.

This chain of events shows how complex the world is today. If fewer people had cell phones, as was the case just a decade ago, they wouldn’t have been able to capture Bouazizi’s self-immolation. If fewer people were connected on social media, the news wouldn’t have gone viral. Push decisions down to the edge of the organization, where information is the freshest and most salient: the cash register, the production line, the call center, and sales reps. Move from protecting information to democratization of information.

In Wired for Innovation, Erik Brynjolfsson and Adam Saunders describe ho.Two experts on the information economy explore the true economic value of technology and innovation.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Wired for Innovation: How Information Technology Is.Place of Publication Cambridge, Mass. by Erik Brynjolfsson, Adam Saunders.

Place of Publication Cambridge, Mass. Series The MIT Press. At The Nile, if you're looking for it, we've got it. Author Biography. ISBN-13 9780262518611.

Two experts on the information economy explore the true economic value of technology and innovation.

A wave of business innovation is driving the productivity resurgence in the U.S. economy. In Wired for Innovation, Erik Brynjolfsson and Adam Saunders describe how information technology directly or indirectly created this productivity explosion, reversing decades of slow growth. They argue that the companies with the highest level of returns to their technology investment are doing more than just buying technology; they are inventing new forms of organizational capital to become digital organizations. These innovations include a cluster of organizational and business-process changes, including broader sharing of information, decentralized decision-making, linking pay and promotions to performance, pruning of non-core products and processes, and greater investments in training and education.

Innovation continues through booms and busts. This book provides an essential guide for policy makers and economists who need to understand how information technology is transforming the economy and how it will create value in the coming decade.


Qwne
Erik Brynjolfsson and Adam Saunders tackle the issue of information technology's impact on the economy in this book. The book's title is misleading, as this book is NOT about innovation, so people looking to read up on the subject should give this book a pass. Instead this book is intended to "provide a guide for policy makers and economics who want to understand how information technology is transforming the economy ..." page 11.

Information and IT in the economy is a complex and difficult subject and the authors provide a comprehensive view of the issue and where it stands from the perspective of academic research. This book is a good at covering the history of academic research on the topics of IT's contribution to the economy, measuring information in the economy, organizational capital and the like.

Recommended for readers who are comfortable reading academic research on macroeconomics, as I believe this is the intended audience. The 128 pages are well written and I was able to read the book on two short haul airline flights. As a book looking to straddle the economic and business world, the authors do a good job. The book centers on a `study of studies' than offering a new hypothesis and supporting research.

As a study of studies, the book seems comprehensive and does a good job of bringing in a range of research publications. There are a few things missing, for example David Teece's work on Dynamic Capabilities. One weakeness is that the book relies on 16 articles authored by Erik Brynjolfsson, by far the most commonly cited author.

As a business or strategy book, Wired for Innovation has some significant shortcomings. First the title is misleading; the book does not talk about innovation and cannot be recommended as an innovation book. The book is concerned with macro economic issues such as measuring IT, information and intangible goods in calculating GDP rather than focusing on individual firms. This requires the reader look hard between the lines to begin to draw information and ideas that would be applicable to any one company.

The book does contain some thought provoking data and the description of economic issues is clear, but I found myself glad I had a background in economics while reading the book. Non-economists will get value from the book, but they will often have to step back and translate the author's intend into their experience and knowledge to have it make sense.

In the end this is a good book that bridges the academic and macro business community. There are other policy oriented books that offer more insight and impact such as Zitrain's "The Future of the Internet and How to Stop It" or Beckler's "The Wealth of Networks"

Four stars as an academic/economic book, three stars as a business oriented book and three stars overall. I am glad I read the book and I have many notes in the margin, but that is more from taking an economic outlook rather than one as a business executive looking to understand the role and value of information and IT in their firm and the economy.
Nnulam
Brynjolfsson and Saunders have written a short, easy to read but cogent explanation of the mysterious productivity increase arising from IT. The book was intended to illuminate strategy and it did just that. They discuss at length how the IT revolution had to be merged with equivalent business processes before the value could be realized. Both IT and procedural changes are necessary. Organizational capital, not shown on the balance sheet, accounts for a great deal of productivity. I particularly liked the "seven pillars of the digital organization." Some firms get extraordinary value out of IT; others, spending just as much money, do not. Another point stressed is that a dollar of IT assets, with appropriate training, support and organizational change, can provide far more value than a dollar spent on plant and equipment. The author's assertions are backed up by copious hard dollar examples as well as references in the literature. If you are a fast reader, you can cover the material in 3-5 hours. This is a real contribution to the IT and business literature. Bill Yarberry, Houston Texas
happy light
Shows you how to identify the intangible value of IT, whether in business or in everyday life.
Morlurne
While I don't underestimate or downrate Brynjolfsson's technical research, this is a dense economic text, and didn't focus nearly as much on innovation as I had expected from the title.
Vudozilkree
This book is written very much like a college thesis e.g., "...Smith and Jones (2004) concluded that...," or "...developed by Smith and Jones (2003)," however, this technique was used so much it become a distraction. Also, many of the references he makes to justify his thoughts are actually references to himself. This book states the obvious and provides no practical strategies or methods to measure intangibles - which it started out to do. The information is nice to know but not useful in the practical world.