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Download Doing Economics: A Guide to Understanding and Carrying Out Economic Research fb2

by Steven A. Greenlaw
Download Doing Economics: A Guide to Understanding and Carrying Out Economic Research fb2
Management & Leadership
  • Author:
    Steven A. Greenlaw
  • ISBN:
    0618379835
  • ISBN13:
    978-0618379835
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    South-Western College Pub; 1 edition (May 27, 2005)
  • Pages:
    304 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Management & Leadership
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1134 kb
  • ePUB format
    1308 kb
  • DJVU format
    1619 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    945
  • Formats:
    lrf azw doc lit


By Steven A. Greenlaw - Doing Economics: A Guide to Understanding and .

A Guide for the Young Economist (The MIT Press). Economics has become increasingly mathematical, but this book spend only one chapter dealing with theorising and model-building in economics, and at a very basic level. Also, the discussion of regressions is also quite basic.

Doing Economics book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Doing Economics book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

By: Greenlaw, Steven A. Material type: BookPublisher: Boston, Massachusetts : Houghton Mifflin Company, . 006Description: xiii, 289 p. ; 21 c. SBN: 0618379835. Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Holdings ( 4 ). Title notes.

by Steven A. Greenlaw. The Weekend Homesteader is organized by month-so whether it's January or June you'll find exciting, short projects that you can use to dip your toes into the vast ocean of homesteading without getting overwhelmed.

Outlines & Highlights for Doing Economics Never HIGHLIGHT a Book Again Includes all testable terms, concepts, persons, places, and events. Cram101 Just the FACTS101 studyguides gives all of the outlines, highlights, and quizzes for your textbook with optional online comprehensive practice tests. Assembled Product Weight.

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By (author) Steven A.

This handy reference text provides undergraduate students with a practical introduction to research methodology. Doing Economics makes students aware of what experienced researchers know implicitly: research is fundamentally a process of constructing persuasive arguments supported by theory and empirical evidence. As a result, students learn how to implement critical-reading, writing, and online research skills to produce valid and reliable research.

Rose Of Winds
I've had the honor and privilege of taking this class with the amazing Dr. Greenlaw himself. This book is the only I know of that actually takes a person through the process of how to start, work on, and complete a economics paper. Economics is very different than most other subjects, and figuring out where to start and how to get going once you know where to start can be extremely challenging. Dr. Greenlaw's book takes you through the entire process step by step. Literally all you have to do is to just follow this book, insert your data, and watch your paper come together.
Vudogal
This product was all torn and I had to glue pages.
Unnis
A good resource for writing economic papers.
Malann
Helped me a lot with my course.
Moralsa
I am using the book for my undergraduate class. The book is precise, simple to use yet detailed enough for anyone in need of a systematic book on economic research. Thank you and I really enjoy using the book when I prepare my lecture notes.
Macill
delivered a little late due to the storms and snow but its really in good shape .
I do love it and its very handy
Dorizius
Much is published on research in fields like business, sociology, education etc., but very little specifically for economics. This book is a step towards filling that gap (the other being the book by Don Ethridge), which is welcome, since economic research has its own challenges. Unlike the Ethridge book, this book does not get into the philosphy of science and avoids philosophical jargon (ontology, epistemics, etc...)

Greenlaw starts with an overview of the research process, from developing the question to communicating the results. He explains how to search economic literature - noting the sources that would be of particular interest to economic researchers - and a chapter on how to read and make sense of this literature. He spends two chapters on argument and writing, always putting the ideas in an economic context. Four of the 12 chapters deal with data issues: sources (mainly for the US), basic manipulation of data, empirical research design and regressions.

Economics has become increasingly mathematical, but this book spend only one chapter dealing with theorising and model-building in economics, and at a very basic level. Also, the discussion of regressions is also quite basic. This is not necessarily a weakness, as there are many young researchers who need a simple explanation of these areas to provide a foundation from which to develop their skills further.

I would recommend this book to any inexperienced economic researcher, and to economics professors who need to introduce their students to scholarly research in economics.
In an ideal world, an undergraduate economics major sitting down to write a thesis or participate in a capstone course would have already developed most of the statistical, academic writing, and critical reading skills taught in this book. But we don't live in an ideal world. So, I disagree with the reviewer who said this book is of use only to freshmen: I would also recommend it advanced undergrads and even beginning graduate students who need help learning to produce, and to present, scholarly work.

Unfortunately, the current edition is now five years old. So, while Greenlaw's discussion of online resources is good as far as it goes, it's probably time for a new edition. For example, while it's surprising that even the 2006 edition doesn't mention RePEc, the omission of RePEc and IDEAS is now a glaring hole in its coverage. Likewise, while Greenlaw properly refers the reader to other sources for detailed guidelines on citation styles, it's surprising that the word "blog" doesn't appear at all in the index, and this is a shortcoming that is even more significant today. Finally, a new edition of the book should address the use of personal bibliographic management software such as Zotero, BibTeX, RefWorks, and Endnote.