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by Scott Belsky
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Management & Leadership
  • Author:
    Scott Belsky
  • ISBN:
    1591844118
  • ISBN13:
    978-1591844112
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Portfolio; Reprint edition (March 27, 2012)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Management & Leadership
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1830 kb
  • ePUB format
    1686 kb
  • DJVU format
    1696 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    991
  • Formats:
    lit docx mbr lrf


Making Ideas Happen demonstrates that ideas of any magnitude are achievable by simply taking one step at a. .Scott Belsky is a speaker, writer, and an entrepreneur with a focus on the creative industries

Making Ideas Happen demonstrates that ideas of any magnitude are achievable by simply taking one step at a time. Belsky offers an illustrated map to get to the destination of your great ideas. SCOTT THOMAS, Design Director, Obama Presidential Campaign. Scott Belsky is a speaker, writer, and an entrepreneur with a focus on the creative industries. As the founder and CEO of Behance, he oversees the Behance Network, the world's leading platform for creative professionals, with millions of visitors every month, and the annual 99% Conference, devoted to execution in creative teams.

According to Scott Belsky, the capacity to make ideas happen can . Belsky has spent six years studying the habits of especially productive creative people and teams-the ones who make their ideas happen time and time again.

According to Scott Belsky, the capacity to make ideas happen can be strengthened by anyone willing to build their organizational habits and harness the forces of community. That's why he founded Behance, a company that helps creative people and teams across industries develop these skills. After interviewing hundreds of successful creatives, he has compiled their most powerful-and often ctices, such as

Making Ideas Happen book. According to Scott Belsky, the capacity to make ideas happen can be developed by anyone willing to develop their organizational habits and leadership capability

Making Ideas Happen book. According to Scott Belsky, the capacity to make ideas happen can be developed by anyone willing to develop their organizational habits and leadership capability. Belsky has spent six years studying the habits of creative people and teams that are especially productive-the ones who make their ideas happen time and time again.

Belsky, the capacity to make ideas happen can be developed by anyone willing to develop. the committee carefully considered the balance between universities and government facilities in terms. Nuclear Physics: Exploring the Heart of Matter. 276 Pages·2013·672 KB·102,671 Downloads·New!, the committee carefully considered the balance between universities and government facilities in terms. Systems Thinking, : Managing Chaos and Complexity: A Platform for Designing Business Architecture.

Scott Belsky has interviewsed hundreds of the most productive creative people and teams in the world, revealing one common trait: a carefully trained capacity for executing ideas. Implementing your ideas is a skill that can be taught, and Belshy distills the core principles in this book. While many of us obsess about discovering great new ideas, Belsky shows why it is better to develop the capacity to make ideas happen - using old-fashioned passion and perspiration

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

This month, the 99U introduces a new resource for your creative arsenal: our new book, Making Ideas Happen: Overcoming the Obstacles Between Vision & Reality, from Behance founder and CEO Scott Belsky

This month, the 99U introduces a new resource for your creative arsenal: our new book, Making Ideas Happen: Overcoming the Obstacles Between Vision & Reality, from Behance founder and CEO Scott Belsky. Four years in the making, the book is the print embodiment of the 99U mission to chronicle the forces that truly push ideas forward. To put it more plainly, if you’re an avid reader of 99U, you’re probably going to dig this book.

Электронная книга "Making Ideas Happen: Overcoming the Obstacles Between Vision and Reality", Scott Belsky. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Making Ideas Happen: Overcoming the Obstacles Between Vision and Reality" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Making Ideas Happen : Overcoming the Obstacles Between Vision and Reality. Guy Kawasaki, author of Enchantment According to productivity expert Scott Belsky, no one is born with the ability to drive creative projects to completion

Making Ideas Happen : Overcoming the Obstacles Between Vision and Reality. Guy Kawasaki, author of Enchantment According to productivity expert Scott Belsky, no one is born with the ability to drive creative projects to completion. Execution is a skill that must be developed by building your organizational habits and harnessing the support of your colleagues.

"Ideas are easy. Implementation is hard. This book helps you with the hard part." -Guy Kawasaki, author of Enchantment

 

According to productivity expert Scott Belsky, no one is born with the ability to drive creative projects to completion. Execution is a skill that must be developed by building your organizational habits and harnessing the support of your colleagues.

As the founder and CEO of Behance, a company on a mission to empower and organize the creative world, Belsky has studied the habits of especially productive individuals and teams across industries. Now he has compiled the principles and techniques they share, and presents a systematic approach to creative organization and productivity.

While many of us focus on generating and searching for great ideas, Belsky shows why it's better to develop the capacity to make ideas happen-a capacity that endures over time.


Brightcaster
The best ideas make the most money, right?
The sad truth is that ideas that move industries forward are not the result of tremendous creative insight. Rather, it the masterful execution of creative insights that wins – every time. The implications of this truth are the subject of author Scott Belsky’s Wall Street Journal bestseller for 2011.
The book describes the three forces that are necessary to make ideas happen: Organisation and execution; Leveraging communal forces; and Leadership in the creative pursuit.
Organisation is all about applying order to the elements of a creative project that allows for execution. I know that nothing makes me dump a book faster than an author describing the “most effective way” you can motivate yourself, improve yourself or organize yourself. There is “no most effective way” – there is only the highly idiosyncratic way that works best for you. Beslky is far too smart to talk of “the most effective way”, instead he provides a simple and practical format that will work with your own most effective technique.
The best methods for managing creative projects are simple and intuitive. They help you capture your ideas and do something about them – no more, no less. The “Action Method” Belsky describes begins with a simple premise: everything is a project.
Every project can be reduced to these three primary components: Action Steps, References, and Backburner items. All of these need to be captured in any way that works for you.
“Action Steps” are specific things you must do to move an idea forward and must be captured in writing starting with a verb – “Call Linda to get information on…” Ideas don't reveal themselves only in meetings and neither should Action Steps. You will require some means to capture Action Steps anywhere, any time. You can use your phone or a notebook - anything that is always with you.
“References” are pieces of information worth storing, not revering. Most people never refer to the piles of notes they keep anyway. All you need to concern yourself with is how you should identify a Reference so that you can intuitively find it later.
“Backburner” items are ideas for another time, not now. You will need to periodically revisit and curate your Backburner.
While creative people need to be optimistic about the future, they need to be pessimistic about tasks. You should be deeply concerned with how to manage your ideas and projects. Waiting builds apathy and increases the likelihood that another idea will capture your fancy and energy before you have completed the execution of the previous one. Traditional practices such as writing a business plan – ultimately a static document that will inevitably be changed as unforeseen circumstances arise – must be weighed against the benefits of just starting to take incremental action on your ideas.
Proof come Apple, the company known for new ideas and the ability to think differently, which must also be one of the most organised companies on the planet.
So the formula reads: Creativity X Organisation = Impact.
If the first force for making ideas happen is organisation and execution, the second is leveraging communal forces. The notion of the lone creative genius might have existed in the past, but there can be no doubt that it is wildly outdated in the 21st century.
Your community is all around you – your team, mentor's, clients or customers, collaborators, and of course your family and friends. Your community will seldom understand the idea in the beginning, but they will help make it real in the end.
Consider one aspect of your community, your peer group. Three broad categories of creators were found in Belsky’s research: The Dreamers, the Doers, and the polymaths whom he calls Incrementalists. As entrepreneurs, Dreamers often jump from one new business idea to another and are likely to become engaged in new projects at the expense of completing current ones. The Dreamers are more likely than anyone to conceive brilliant solutions, but they are less likely to follow through. Some of the most successful Dreamers attribute their success to a partnership with a Doer.
Doers don't imagine as much because they are obsessively focused on the logistics of execution. Doers often love new ideas, but their tendency is to immerse themselves in the next steps needed to truly actualise the idea. While Dreamers will quickly fall in love with an idea, Doers doubt and chip away at the idea until they love it or, as often, discounted it.
Then they are the Incrementalists – those with the ability to play the role of both Dreamer and Doer. Incrementalists are able to bask in idea generation, distil the action steps needed, and then put ideas into action with tenacity. However, Incrementalists have the tendency to conceive and execute too many ideas simply because they can. Incrementalist are the O blood-type of the world of collaboration – the universal donor.
In the Apple leadership one could call Jonathan Ive (chief designer), Tim Cook (chief operating officer), and the late Steve jobs (chief executive officer) the Dreamer, the Doer, and the Incrementalist respectively. A similar structure exists in the fashion house, Calvin Klein.
Walt Disney, known for his boundless creativity not his scepticism, went to great lengths to ensure that his community, his creative team, reviewed ideas ruthlessly and killed them when necessary. Wired magazine's editor-in-chief Chris Anderson said: I don't believe you can do anything by yourself; any project that is run by a single person is destined to fail.
The last of the three forces that make ideas happen is the specific type of Leadership required for creative pursuits. Leadership capability is what makes the pursuit of an idea sustainable, scalable, and ultimately successful.
An example of a leadership challenge is how to deal with the problem posed by the timeframe of great ideas. Your long-term vision is not going to be enough to sustain the followers you need so badly. How people spend their energy is greatly influenced by the short-term reward systems that permeate our lives. Belsky both raises and offers suggestions for creative leadership challenges like this one.
“Leadership Capability” relates both to your leadership of others as well as your ability to lead yourself. Everyone has tendencies that can become obstacles in the execution of the creative project. An example: The challenge is to capitalise on feedback, but if feedback is so readily available around us and so crucial to making ideas happen, why is there so little focus on it? Though the value is high, the incentive to give feedback to others is low, and the natural desire to hear it is often non-existent.
How you lead yourself separates the winners from the rest.
Execution, community and leadership are worthy of serious consideration at the start of 2012 to give us the best chances of realising our best ideas. This book is a must read for anyone who has great ideas that haven’t yet hitting the bottom-line, or has partners or subordinates with the same tendency. It is rich in insights and its suggestions are practical.
Readability Light ---+- Serious
Insights High -+--- Low
Practical High -+--- Low

Ian Mann of Gateways consults internationally on leadership and strategy
Irostamore
I appreciate the hard work that was dedicated to creating this book. It is a refreshing reminder of what we are capable of achieving. Once involved in a project where a quandary arises, it is easy to become derailed from the initial purpose for starting the project or journey. Making Ideas Happen is a book to be revisited often as a calibrating reference book to decide whether a project is worth sticking with or moving on in a different direction.

I will recommend Making Ideas Happen to all of my friend, family and fellow creatives to help them with their personal and professional quandaries.
Jark
"Genius is one percent inspiration, ninety-nine percent perspiration." -- Thomas Edison

I think the above quote summarizes the gist of this book.

In between the self-promotion, name dropping, and over-promotion of the author's company there is some good material here.

My favorite is when he points out that many creative types flutter from one idea to another, jumping to the latest inspiration and never getting anything finished. That is something that I have always struggled with. I know I'm guilty of it.

I liked the example of Walt Disney's three rooms. Room 1 for rampant brainstorming; room 2 to sort through the ideas from room one; and room 3 for critical review of the results from room 2. This seems like a good way to use space to keep the mind focused on the task at hand.

Summary: Despite it's flaws, it's not a bad book.
Meztihn
This is a no-nonsense look at how creative people can organize themselves to turn their ideas into reality. As the guy that leads the Creative Arts department at our church, I'm always looking for ways to encourage and lead a team of creative people. I'm surrounded by brilliant artists every day. The problem is that often times the brilliance that is in their heads doesn't ever see the light of day in a way that would impact those around them and in our larger community. Scott does a great job managing the tension between art and function.

One of the problems with artists is that they often speak their own language. They'll use phrases like "you wouldn't understand," which quickly alienate themselves from others. Sometimes (although fewer than they'd like to admit), this is accurate. Most of the time it is just an excuse for not finding ways to actually implement those ideas or explain them in a concise way that would make sense. This book doesn't hold back and dives right into the chaos.

The other area that stood out to me in the book was how Belsky talked about skeptics and cynics. Artists tend to be both, and I loved the way that the book differentiated between the two (one is healthy and one is not, according to him).

If you consider yourself a creative/artist, or work with those who do, this book will give you a handful of tools to work with. I'm adding this to my bookshelf of good books for my team.
MisTereO
I was so in love with this book when I started reading it.

"What is this amazing action method that is going to change my life and be the productivity method that finally suits me as a creative personality?"

But as I got into the action method, I discovered it's basically just David Allen's Getting Things Done. If you haven't read GTD, then you may find this book helpful as it's basically the same method adapted to the context of a creative life, but if you have studied GTD, and are looking for something else as far as I can tell this is basically the same thing.