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Download The Brain and Emotional Intelligence: New Insights fb2

by Daniel Goleman
Download The Brain and Emotional Intelligence: New Insights fb2
Management & Leadership
  • Author:
    Daniel Goleman
  • ISBN:
    1934441155
  • ISBN13:
    978-1934441152
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    More Than Sound (April 1, 2011)
  • Pages:
    79 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Management & Leadership
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1215 kb
  • ePUB format
    1426 kb
  • DJVU format
    1196 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    687
  • Formats:
    lrf docx mbr lit


Brain . : our brain on the web – and the neural blindspot that we ignore at our own risk. Why woman are more empathic than men – and when they are not. The dark side of emotion intelligence: The Bernie Madoff syndrome. How to make learning in emotional intelligence last.

Brain . Enjoy! Post navigation. Anthropocene Thinking. Resilience for the Rest of Us. TO READ.

Daniel Goleman introduced the concept of emotional intelligence to psychology. This book presents some new insights into the relevant neuroscience discovered during the last several years. So while I looked forward to reading it, I wasn't expecting it to be only 78 pages. The chapters are very short and to the point, but a more comprehensive treatment would be welcome. Goleman summarizes his emotional intelligence framework (self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relation management) and describes the brain areas involved in each.

In this new book, Daniel Goleman explains what we now know about the brain basis of emotional intelligence, in clear and simple terms. This book will deepen your understanding of emotional intelligence and enhance your ability for its application. You will learn the most recent brain findings that explain: -The Big Question being asked, particularly in academic circles: "Is there such an entity as 'emotional intelligence' that differs from IQ?"

Why IT can matter more than IQ. Daniel goleman. Emotional Intelligence . All sentient beings possess awareness, but among them human beings Emot.

Why IT can matter more than IQ. From the THE NATURE OF EMOTIONAL Emotio. Dietary Reference Intakes. 306 Pages·2001·886 KB·21,601 Downloads·New! published. This new book, "Applications in Dietary Assessment", provides guidance to nutrition and heal. 67 MB·67,546 Downloads. The New Testament in Greek IV (New Testament Tools and Studies). 42 MB·9,067 Downloads·New!. While part of the title claims 'new insights,' The Brain and Emotional Intelligence just summarizes what Goleman has already put out in some of his other books

Daniel Goleman introduced the concept of emotional intelligence to psychology. While part of the title claims 'new insights,' The Brain and Emotional Intelligence just summarizes what Goleman has already put out in some of his other books. It is a quick thumbnail synopsis and therein lies its value.

Although Daniel Goleman’s breakthrough book was the classic Emotional Intelligence, it is his Destructive .

I’d highly recommend it for anyone, and not just the businesspeople and trainers at whom it seems to be primarily aimed.

Nov 25, 2019 - The Brain and Emotional Intelligence: New Insights (NOOK Book). Page Not Found - Daniel Goleman. The Brain and Emotional Intelligence: New Insights (NOOK Book). The Brain and Emotional Intelligence: New InsightsNOOK Book. The NOOK Book (eBook) of the The Brain and Emotional Intelligence: New Insights by Daniel Goleman at Barnes & Noble.

Daniel Goleman Emotional Intelligence Coaching Certification. Enhanced Version of The Brain and Emotional Intelligence. The book is especially beneficial to those working in the emotional intelligence field, and who need to apply the concept in effective action: leaders, executive coaches, human resources officers, managers, and educators. For Apple iBookstore customers, an enhanced version of The Brain and Emotional Intelligence: New Insights features embedded audio clips from leading scientists and leadership coaches such as Richard Davidson, Clay Shirky, Richard Boyatzis, Paul Ekman and Howard Gardner.

Over the last decade and a half there has been a steady stream of new insights that further illuminate the dynamics of emotional intelligence. In this new book, Daniel Goleman explains what we now know about the brain basis of emotional intelligence, in clear and simple terms. This book will deepen your understanding of emotional intelligence and enhance your ability for its application. You will learn the most recent brain findings that explain: -The Big Question being asked, particularly in academic circles: "Is there such an entity as 'emotional intelligence' that differs from IQ?" -The brain's ethical radar -The neural dynamics of creativity -The brain circuitry for drive, persistence, and motivation -The brain states underlying optimal performance, and how to enhance them -The social brain: rapport, resonance, and interpersonal chemistry -Brain 2.0: our brain on the web -The varieties of empathy and key gender differences -The dark side: sociopathy at work -Neural lessons for coaching and enhancing emotional intelligence abilities

Bloodhammer
Daniel Goleman introduced the concept of emotional intelligence to psychology. This book presents some new insights into the relevant neuroscience discovered during the last several years. So while I looked forward to reading it, I wasn't expecting it to be only 78 pages. The chapters are very short and to the point, but a more comprehensive treatment would be welcome.

Goleman summarizes his emotional intelligence framework (self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relation management) and describes the brain areas involved in each. Sections are devoted to creativity, motivation, good and bad stress, empathy, psychopathy (only 1 page, however), neuroplasticity and neurogenesis. Most helpful to me were the sections on stress and empathy. Goleman's distinction between 'frazzle' and 'flow' describes the serious physical and cognitive problems that come with stress, and the methods to combat stress and develop 'flow'. In a state of flow, concentration is effortless, flexible, and joyful.

As for empathy, Goleman distinguishes between cognitive, emotional, and and motoric (empathic concern). Cognitive empathy is the most primitive kind (the extent of psychopaths' empathy, for example), being able to take another's perspective. Emotional empathy is the basis for feeling en rapport with others, and empathic concern is the prompt for acts of compassion - actually doing something.

The Brain and Emotional Intelligence (***) has some interesting ideas, and is a good summary of the relevant brain research, but doesn't have a whole lot of meat on it. I'd recommend Goleman's other books, or the works of Daniel Siegel for something more substantial.
Bajinn
This digital book is a must-read for anyone who wants to know what emotional intelligence truly is: Daniel Goleman will help you understand the neural basis of emotional intelligence versus IQ. While the book is an essential tool for any educators/trainers or coaches specializing in field, it is also very useful for anyone who wants to improve their emotional intelligence abilities. Business leaders, for example, will find some useful tools for employee engagement. There is even a section that will be of interest to parents.

The book consists of 15 rich chapters:

1. Is Emotional Intelligence a Distinct Set of Abilities?
2. Self-Awareness
3. The Right Brain State for the Job
4. The Creative Brain
5. Self-Mastery
6. Managing Stress
7. Motivation: What Moves Us
8. Optimal Performance
9. The Social Brain
10. The Social Brain Online
11. The Varieties of Empathy
12. Gender Differences
13. The Dark Side (sociopaths in the workplace)
14. Developing Emotional Intelligence
15. Social Emotional Learning

Using seminal studies conducted by Reuven Bar-On, Goleman helps us see that there are unique areas of the brain that govern emotional intelligence. This is explained in concise, crystal-clear language, with well-illustrated diagrams of brain areas associated with emotional intelligence. The illustrations showed up in beautiful color on my IPAD.

Among the many things you will derive from reading this book is an understanding, for example, of why bad habits are so entrenched: they form a thick circuitry and become hard wired but we can use the power of neuroplasticity (i.e. the brain continually reshapes itself according to new experiences) to form new habits that become the brain's new default option. Goleman provides tips on how to overcome bad habits and form new ones.

In the chapter on managing stress, we learn that when we are in the grip of an emotional hijack, there is intense activity in the right prefrontal cortex while when we are feeling great, "enthused, energized, like we could take on anything," it is the left prefrontal area that lights up. We all have an "emotional setpoint," a left-to-right ratio of prefrontal activity that is an accurate prediction of our typical mood range from day to day.

We find out that there are three kinds of empathy: cognitive, emotional and empathic concern and each relies on different brain circuitry -- the book gives a few pointers on how to boost our empathy abilities.

On the Social Brain Online: Goleman reminds us that "Nature designed the social brain for face-to-face interactions," not for the digital world and he outlines the implications this has for our communications. You'll learn an interesting fact about the "negativity bias to email" and the one factor that can lower a group's IQ.

In the chapter on Optimal Performance, the author clearly outlines the relationship between stress and performance and the concept of flow, what is commonly known as "being in the zone." As a leader, it is your responsibility to understand where your team is in terms of a) disengagement (bored, uninspired), b) frazzled (overwhelmed by pressure), or c) in a flow state (optimal performance), so that you can create the conditions for everyone to do their best work. This book shows you the various pathways to flow for yourself and others on your team.

For parents, Goleman explains that emotional intelligence abilities start in early years and develop over the course of one's life. You'll understand the stages of brain growth in a child and why Social Emotional Learning (SEL) programs in schools give your child a head start: they provide the neural lessons they need as their brain grows. Goleman outlines research that shows that SEL programs reduce anti-social behavior and improve academic performance.

A lot of useful information is packed in this very brief e-book that you can read in one sitting. It brings in one convenient place studies done by some of the big names in the field, for example, Antonio Damasio (decision-making without emotion is neurologically impossible); Daniel Siegel (mindfulness and the brain); Barbara Frederickson(positivity), to name a few. It's a gift to have the latest brain science applicable to emotional intelligence in one small package, easily accessible to anyone.
Hadadel
Emotional intelligence is essential to a happy and satisfying life. Goleman provides an overview and summary not only how to increase our emotional intelligence, but also describes the brain structures underlying emotional intelligence.
Wymefw
Goleman's thoughtful and well researched text is written in an approachable manner yet doesn't sacrifice rigor of content. He clearly has data to back up each of his claims which makes teachers, parents, and any service provider to children really wonder really wonder what the heck the current practices were based on. . . it certainly isn't brain based research. As an academic myself, I use Goleman's work in all of my classes, it is just that good. If we are not working to find ways to connect with one another and develop our social emotional selves, we will continue to have people in government and power positions making social policies that ignore those dimensions of humans. That is very scary to me. Read this book! Think about how to develop this dimension in yourself, those around you, in your community and in our government. An America that is emotionally intelligent would make very different decisions that it current does. Dr. Brian Husby, Ph.D.
LeXXXuS
There is a great deal of useful information about neuroscience and how it could be involved with our emotions. It is certainly useful and informative. If you want to go further Daniel Siegel has more to say, but John J Ratey on ADHD is the most useful I have seen so far.
He is able to explain how critical brain processing (affected by neurotransmitters and heritary) is in 'ways of being' in the world. What we pay attention to is said to determine what we 'know' and his books say much about this subject.
Shistus
This short book is a great and basic introduction and explanation of EI. It will get you started, and point your way to other materials, should you wish for more. The explanations of how our brain absorbs and reacts to external stimuli is incredibly applicable in the classroom. There is also a brief explanation throughout the book of examples of actions, both good and bad and the effect in light of EI theory. This knowledge should be in every teacher's toolbox!