» » Training for Impact: How to Link Training to Business Needs and Measure the Results

Download Training for Impact: How to Link Training to Business Needs and Measure the Results fb2

by Dana Gaines Robinson
Download Training for Impact: How to Link Training to Business Needs and Measure the Results fb2
Management & Leadership
  • Author:
    Dana Gaines Robinson
  • ISBN:
    1555421539
  • ISBN13:
    978-1555421533
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Pfeiffer; 1 edition (August 12, 2013)
  • Pages:
    336 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Management & Leadership
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1164 kb
  • ePUB format
    1564 kb
  • DJVU format
    1510 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    116
  • Formats:
    txt azw mbr lrf


Dana Gaines Robinson (Author).

Dana Gaines Robinson (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. The indirect value is that by reading in the context of training rather than IT, perhaps we can see our own problems.

Training for Impact book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. Dana Gaines Robinson

DANA GAINES ROBINSON is president and founder of the consulting firm . Part One: Moving from Activity Training to Impact Training. Great book! I bought it for a masters level class but I will definitely keep it!

DANA GAINES ROBINSON is president and founder of the consulting firm Partners in Change, Inc. См. подробнee. The Training-for-Impact Approach. Part Two: Creating Strategic Partnerships with Management. Identifying Business Needs and Clients. Forming a Collaborative Relationship with Clients. Conducting Initial Project Meetings. Part Three: Diagnosing Organizational Needs and Making Training Decisions. Assessing Performance Effectiveness. Great book! I bought it for a masters level class but I will definitely keep it!

Provides how-to strategies for implementing results-oriented training. Explains how to develop a collaborative, "client-consultant" relationship with line managers and to yield better management support for training efforts.

Provides how-to strategies for implementing results-oriented training. Tells how to document bottom-line results of training programs and communicate their value to management in cost-benefit terms. Provides how-to strategies for implementing results-oriented training.

This book provides training managers with methods for reporting how a training program contributes to a company's bottom line

This book provides training managers with methods for reporting how a training program contributes to a company's bottom line. Recently Viewed and Featured.

DANA GAINES ROBINSON is president and founder of the consulting firm Partners in Change, Inc. JAMES C. .13. Operational Results: Measuring Impact on the Business. Part Five: Using the Training-for-Impact Approach. 14. How and Where to Begin. ROBINSON is chairman of the consulting firm Partners in Change, Inc. Before becoming consultants, both authors managed the training function for major corporations. Request permission to reuse content from this site. 2.

Dana Gaines Robinson. Please tell us how we can improve it. Cancel.

El consejo del jardinero: identificar los factores que conducen al óptimo rendimiento. Coauthors & Alternates.

Training for Impact (How to Stop Spinning Your Wheels and Get into the Race). Dana Gaines Robinson. Commodity analysis: its application in the context of the South African mining finance house.

Training professionals are shifting their focus from teaching to improving the performance of individuals and organizations. Dana Gaines Robinson and James C. Robinson have compiled a series of articles by members of the Association for Training and Development that approach this trend from varying angles. The common theme is identified at the start: Trainers are becoming performance consultants, working with companies to improve business performance, learning and work environments.

Document your efforts in terms management will understandAre your employee training efforts really paying off? In thishands-on guide, two top human resources consultants present aresults-oriented, twelve-step approach that directly links trainingto specific organizational goals. Here is all the information andguidance you need to create a work environment that reinforces newskills and maximizes training results. You'll also learn todocument the effect your efforts have on the bottom line, tracksubtle but important changes in employee values and beliefs, anddemonstrate increased sales and productivity. It's THE definitivehandbook for tracking and cost justification of training anddevelopment efforts.

Samut
This is a good book with many specific,useful examples and takeaways for each chapter however, it is a bit dated in some of its references. That said, it was still a valuable resource for me to become more aware of the buy in process and levels of evaluation for my work as an instructional designer.
Ieslyaenn
As an IT or business person, one might write this book off of your list; however, I found it good, with a perpetual value that transcends its copyright date. Personalizing the text, it would ask: are you a contributor, knowing your impact, or a performer, doing your job? If one adapts the title to "Link Business Needs and Measure Results" it would describe my daily problem of linking IT to Business? I believe that it does. The indirect value is that by reading in the context of training rather than IT, perhaps we can see our own problems. The direct value is that every day we encounter people, process and technical problems, and within these are knowledge and skill problems; by considering a different approach, perhaps we can be more successful. There are many good thoughts, but more, it contrasts thought and pattern making its content identifiable to both consultants and executives.
Malann
This book has some great highlights. This was one of my textbooks that I used for my college studies.
Zorve
Very helpful in the field of Training and development
Ce
Lots of lip service gets paid to training, but most training functions usually reside at the cutting edge of the downsizing axe. This book provides training managers with methods for reporting how a training program contributes to a company's bottom line. It sheds light on how the intangible attributes of trainees (one of which is the knowledge learned in a training program) get transferred into work skills, and how both knowledge and skills can be quantified into numbers which management can understand.
The only drawbacks are: 1) that there is not enough of a discussion about statistical methods for data interpretation, and 2) some examples of purposeful, targeted questions would definitely be useful. However, overall, I am happy to have this text become part of my daily playbook.
Wanenai
Great book, amazing condition