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by Lewis Lapham
Download Lapham's Rules of Influence: A Careerist's Guide to Success, Status, and Self-Congratulation fb2
Job Hunting & Careers
  • Author:
    Lewis Lapham
  • ISBN:
    0679426051
  • ISBN13:
    978-0679426059
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Random House; 1 edition (May 18, 1999)
  • Pages:
    131 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Job Hunting & Careers
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1360 kb
  • ePUB format
    1651 kb
  • DJVU format
    1697 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    502
  • Formats:
    lrf lit lrf doc


Anyone interested in self-advancement will be transformed by Lapham's Rules of Influence, which.

Anyone interested in self-advancement will be transformed by Lapham's Rules of Influence, which. Lewis Lapham was born in 1935 in San Francisco and educated at the Hotchkiss School, Yale University, and Cambridge University. He is the author of several books of essays, including The Wish for Kings, Money and Class in America, Fortune's Child, Imperial Masquerade, Hotel America, and Waiting for the Barbarians.

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Lapham's Rules of Influence book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Lapham's Rules of Influence book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Lapham's Rules of Influence: A Careerist's Guide to Success, Status, and Self-Congratulation as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Lapham's Rules of Influence : A Careerist's Guide to Success, Status, and Self-Congratulation. Published by Thriftbooks. More subtle than Paul Fussel's book Class, the book is devastatingly funny at times. See the section on "Understatement". I highly recommend reading this book before attending charity gala events.

Snotty in tone, but containing more than a grain of truth, the tome delivers catty, ek social observations. Oh, behave! Rudeness: B+ Lapham’s: B.

Lapham's Rules of Influence. A Careerist's Guide to Success, Status, and Self-Congratulation

Lapham's Rules of Influence. A Careerist's Guide to Success, Status, and Self-Congratulation. Now, in this scathingly funny and politically incorrect self-help book, Mr. Lapham offers his best advice to aspiring careerists seeking to ride in helicopters and see themselves on television. Drawing upon a lifetime of experience among the cogno-scenti, Mr. Lapham breaks rank and reveals the unspoken secrets of getting ahead: what to say, how to dress, when to lie, whom to befriend, where to be seen, and why it is absolutely essential to wear clean shoes. "The first impression is also the last impression.

Anyone interested in self-advancement will be transformed by Lapham's Rules of Influence, which offers proven nuggets of wisdom. For example, when trying to impress the boss, remember: "Flattery cannot be too often or too recklessly applied. Think of it as suntan lotion or moisturizing cream.

Conversations with History: Lewis Lapham. Rules of Influence: A Careerist's Guide to Success, Status, and Self-Congratulation - Lewis Lapham.

He is the founder of Lapham's Quarterly, a quarterly publication about history and literature, and has written numerous books on politics and current affairs. YouTube Encyclopedic. Conversations with History: Lewis Lapham.

Rules of Influence - excerpts from "Lapham's Rules of Influence: A Careerist's Guide to Success, Status .

Rules of Influence - excerpts from "Lapham's Rules of Influence: A Careerist's Guide to Success, Status, and Self-Congratulation. A generation ago," Lapham observed, "the graduates of the country's well-to-do universities might have mentioned the name of a dead poet, or said something about truth and its untimely betrayals.

As the editor of Harper's Magazine, Lewis Lapham has enjoyed entrée to America's "cultural elite," a class distinguished by its talent for currying favor, licking boots, and kissing ass. Now, in this scathingly funny and politically incorrect self-help book, Mr. Lapham offers his best advice to aspiring careerists seeking to ride in helicopters and see themselves on television.        Drawing upon a lifetime of experience among the cogno-scenti, Mr. Lapham breaks rank and reveals the unspoken secrets of getting ahead: what to say, how to dress, when to lie, whom to befriend, where to be seen, and why it is absolutely essential to wear clean shoes. ("The first impression is also the last impression. You don't wish to be remembered as the stain on the rug.")        Anyone interested in self-advancement will be transformed by Lapham's Rules of Influence, which offers proven nuggets of wisdom. For example, when trying to impress the boss, remember: "Flattery cannot be too often or too recklessly applied. Think of it as suntan lotion or moisturizing cream."        Written with stinging wit and tongue planted firmly in cheek, Lapham's Rules of Influence is a brilliant critique of class and manners in America, packed with the kind of irreverent observation that only Lewis Lapham can provide.  Seek out the acquaintance of people richer and more important than yourself, and never take an interest in people who cannot do you any favors.  Rumor tinged with malice is the most precious form of gossip. When you are invited to spend a weekend with important journalists or movie stars, it is considered polite to bring four items of unpublished slander in lieu of a house present or a bottle of wine.  Make unsparing use of clichés. The empty word is the correct word. Contrary to the opinion of snobbish New York intellectuals, the placid murmur of cliché is always preferable to the expression of strong feeling, which is an embarrassment.  A truly fashionable dinner party ends at the moment when all the guests have arrived and everybody has been seen or not seen. Once attendance has been taken, the rest of the evening is superfluous.  A good meeting is one at which nothing happens. Sit erect, second all the motions, remember everybody's name.

Unnis
LAPHAM'S RULES OF INFLUENCE: A CAREERIST'S GUIDE TO SUCCESS, STATUS AND SELF CONGRATUATIONS, is a well-written litte book, with easy-to-read,
one-four page chapters. The print size is good, the text double-spaced, the binding that of the very best in trade-paperback volumes.

The advice within may, at first glance, SEEM quite self-centered and
opportunistic -- and also totally non-politically correct: (__Curiousity__ Never be seen to taking notes or asking more than a few polite questions, to which you don't expect important answers. Too much curiousity is a mark of inferiour rank. You will be mistaken for a tourist or a waiter.....)

However, Mr. Lapham is also the author of "The American Ruling Class", a DVD which takes exactly the opposite view of soiety than the book,
"Lapham's Rules of Influece." This shows, to me, that Lapham is the
epitome of the best kind of 21st century person: a person who cares about his own future and how to obtain his fortune, but who ALSO genuinely CARES about other human beings, and wishes them the best of everything, (too!) Wanting the best for everyone does not mean one must necessarily exclude one's self.

If Mr. Lapham is not yet a member of the Robin Hood Society, I here respctfully suggest that he look into it. Putting one's self up, as well as also realizing the potential of every other human being, and putting them up, as well, is certainly an example to be followed. It is far better than what so many others do-- putting both one's self, and the rest of humanity, down.

Mr. Latham writes with wit and much erudity. He is the leader who would teach others, but who would not put himself above them. Sane, and honest, "Lapham's Rules of Influence", together with "The American Ruling Class" DVD, show both sides of remrkable man. An obvious, (and quite deserving) millionaire, but with a heart and consciece, (and writing ability), as big as all outdoors.

May we all be able to acquire Mr. Latham's erudite head, and compassonate heart!
JOGETIME
Like the very best humor, Lapham's observations are cuttingly true. Each brief chapter is sadly, hilariously, authentically true.
Dagdarad
Lapham really strains the separation between comedy and tragedy in this book. It is one of the funniest books I've ever read yet I wouldn't classify it as fiction. I read it during a plane flight and gave it to a companion. Now I have to buy myself another copy because it contains so much tragically true wisdom. Wisdom that I should put into practice.

Lapham actually supplies the rules of business etiquette. I wish I'd known them when I was young. My youthful idealism was not helpful. All those suck ups and yes men I detested have a much easier path to success. I used to resent them. Now I realize that they're probably just smarter than me. sigh

If you enjoy this book (and you will) you'll also enjoy The American Ruling Class.
Manesenci
Hilarious! I wish I had read it earlier! youtube yaron brook
Talvinl
funny , quirky and as always brilliant observations about "Society & Human Nature.."
artman
Simply a tour of the witty truths of the culture of influence. I am laughing my dance card away during the beggars waltz!
Nten
If you are looking to navigate your way to the top, this book offers the path of action to do so. Those without corporate background may deem this cynical entertainment... Those with a corporate background will easily see that this book gives you permission to see it for what it is. You have to truly afford the voice, so get there without losing yourself in the process.
A friend recommended this book and it's a quick read with lots of witty & shrewd advice. Great read & can be covered in an afternoon. Loved it &, surprisingly, laughed quit a bit!