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by Johanna von Braun
Download The Domestic Politics of Negotiating International Trade: Intellectual Property Rights in US-Colombia and US-Peru Free Trade Agreements (Routledge Research in International Economic Law) fb2
International
  • Author:
    Johanna von Braun
  • ISBN:
    0415601398
  • ISBN13:
    978-0415601399
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge; 1 edition (December 13, 2011)
  • Pages:
    280 pages
  • Subcategory:
    International
  • Language:
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    1693 kb
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  • Rating:
    4.1
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The Domestic Politics of International Trade considers the issues surrounding intellectual property . Johanna von Braun has been working in the fields of intellectual property, trade and development for over ten years

Johanna von Braun has been working in the fields of intellectual property, trade and development for over ten years. She currently lives in South Africa where she was based as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Cape Town during the writing of the book.

The Domestic Politics of International Trade considers the issues surrounding intellectual property . Johanna von Braun has been working in the fields of intellectual property, trade and development for over ten years.

Throughout the book the author demonstrates the importance of domestic politics in understanding the nature and outcome of international negotiations, particularly as they relate to international economic diplomacy.

The Domestic Politics of International Trade considers the issues surrounding intellectual property rights .

By negotiating Free Trade Agreements the EU aspires both to increase the competitiveness of its industry and contribute to sustainable . The domestic battle over the design of non-trade issues in preferential trade agreements.

By negotiating Free Trade Agreements the EU aspires both to increase the competitiveness of its industry and contribute to sustainable development in the partner country. It pursues a flexible approach to norm promotion which aims at supporting developing countries in their attempt to adjust to international standards. Ideational and institutionalist scholars interpreted this approach as a manifestation of its normative power.

We look forward to pursuing new trade initiatives in close cooperation with our LDC partners at the WTO Ministerial .

We look forward to pursuing new trade initiatives in close cooperation with our LDC partners at the WTO Ministerial Meeting this week and in the future," said US Trade Representative Ron Kirk said in a statement. However, critics claimed that, as the US is a net cotton exporter, the measures would do little to address the concerns expressed by West African cotton producers. The domestic politics of negotiating international trade: intellectual property rights in us-colombia and us-peru free trade agreements. By Johanna von Braun (12 December 2011)

We describe the economic conditions necessary for an FTA to be an equilibrium outcome, both for the case when the agreement must cover all bilateral trade and when a few, politically sensitive sectors can be excluded from the agreement.

We describe the economic conditions necessary for an FTA to be an equilibrium outcome, both for the case when the agreement must cover all bilateral trade and when a few, politically sensitive sectors can be excluded from the agreement. 599 K). Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX. Document Object Identifier (DOI): 1. 386/w4597.

Intellectual property (IP) is a category of property that includes intangible creations of the human intellect. There are many types of intellectual property, and some countries recognize more than others. Early precursors to some types of intellectual property existed in societies such as Ancient Rome, but the modern concept of intellectual property developed in England in the 17th and 18th centuries.

Property rights are theoretical socially-enforced constructs in economics for determining how a resource or economic good is used and owned. Resources can be owned by (and hence be the property of) individuals, associations, collectives, or governments. Property rights can be viewed as an attribute of an economic good. This attribute has four broad components and is often referred to as a bundle of rights: the right to use the good. the right to earn income from the good.

The Domestic Politics of International Trade considers the issues surrounding intellectual property rights in international trade negotiations in order to examine the challenges posed to domestic policy-makers by the increasingly broad nature of Free Trade Agreements (FTAs). Throughout the book the author demonstrates the importance of domestic politics in understanding the nature and outcome of international negotiations, particularly as they relate to international economic diplomacy.

The book looks in detail at the intellectual property negotiations which formed part of the US-Peru and US-Colombia Free Trade Agreements and analyses the extent to which public health authorities and other parties affected by the increased levels of intellectual property protection were integrated into the negotiation process. The book then juxtaposes these findings with an analysis of the domestic origins of US negotiation objectives in the field of intellectual property, paying particular attention to the role of the private sector in the development of these objectives. Based on a substantial amount of empirical research, including approximately 100 interviews with negotiators, capital based policy-makers, private sector representatives, and civil society organisations in Lima, Bogotá and Washington, DC, this book offers a rare account of different stakeholders’ perceptions of the FTA negotiation process. Ultimately, the book succeeds in integrating the study of domestic politics with that of international negotiations.

This book will be of particular interest to academics as well as practitioners and students in the fields of international law, economic law, intellectual property, political economy, international relations, comparative politics and government.