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by Alison Fleig Frank
Download Oil Empire: Visions of Prosperity in Austrian Galicia (Harvard Historical Studies) fb2
Industries
  • Author:
    Alison Fleig Frank
  • ISBN:
    0674025415
  • ISBN13:
    978-0674025417
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Harvard University Press (September 15, 2007)
  • Pages:
    366 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Industries
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1981 kb
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    1372 kb
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    1103 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
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    132
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Oil Empire: Visions of Prosperity in Austrian Galicia (Harvard Historical Studies).

Oil Empire: Visions of Prosperity in Austrian Galicia (Harvard Historical Studies). Download (pdf, . 1 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

The task of Frank’s Oil Empire is to present the province of Galicia as a region whose economic potential had .

The task of Frank’s Oil Empire is to present the province of Galicia as a region whose economic potential had been squandered. Through her manuscript, Frank demonstrates how a territory, once known as the land where salt and oil flow, turned into an economic catastrophe due to too much autonomy (24, 255). In short, Frank’s vision of Galicia portrays an industry ripe with potential that ends up self-destructing through the mismanagement of the industry by a combination of governmental and entrepreneurial entities, as well as through the cultural clashes that existed between Galicians.

Recommend this journal. Austrian History Yearbook.

Oil Empire and Visions of Prosperity in Austrian Galicia. Published by Harvard University Press (2007). ISBN 10: 0674025415 ISBN 13: 9780674025417. By 1918, the Central Powers did not have enough oil to maintain a modern military.

Harvard University Press, 2005. The variations in water temperature and the oil temperature are also discussed in this paper. What type of file do you want? RIS. BibTeX.

The decision about vision datasets based on ocean battlefield environment information, and a kind. of human-machine intelligent decision based on the style of CT was proposed. This method provided a fast and effective way to resolve the problems about underwater detection and anti-detection applying vision datasets and increased decision's speed and credibility.

Visions of Prosperity in Austrian Galicia. She portrays this often overlooked oil boom’s transformation of the environment, and its reorientation of religious and social divisions that had defined a previously agrarian population, as surprising alliances among traditional foes sprang up among workers and entrepreneurs, at the workplace, and in the pubs and brothels of new oiltowns.

By 1918, the Central Powers did not have enough oil to maintain a modern military.

Austria-Hungary was not the only country to suffer from an incomplete understanding of the issue, however. The book's title and especially its subtitle, Visions of Prosperity, raise significant questions for understanding today's world as well as that of the previous century.

Historical dictionary of Austria.

At the beginning of the twentieth century, the Austrian Empire ranked third among the world's oil-producing states (surpassed only by the United States and Russia), and accounted for five percent of global oil production. By 1918, the Central Powers did not have enough oil to maintain a modern military. How and why did the promise of oil fail Galicia (the province producing the oil) and the Empire?

In a brilliantly conceived work, Alison Frank traces the interaction of technology, nationalist rhetoric, social tensions, provincial politics, and entrepreneurial vision in shaping the Galician oil industry. She portrays this often overlooked oil boom's transformation of the environment, and its reorientation of religious and social divisions that had defined a previously agrarian population, as surprising alliances among traditional foes sprang up among workers and entrepreneurs, at the workplace, and in the pubs and brothels of new oiltowns.

Frank sets this complex story in a context of international finance, technological exchange, and Habsburg history as a sobering counterpoint to traditional modernization narratives. As the oil ran out, the economy, the population, and the environment returned largely to their former state, reminding us that there is nothing ineluctable about the consequences of industrial development.


Jugami
The task of Frank’s Oil Empire is to present the province of Galicia as a region whose economic potential had been squandered. Through her manuscript, Frank demonstrates how a territory, once known as “the land where salt and oil flow,” turned into an economic catastrophe due to “too much autonomy” (24, 255). Frank starts out by explaining that, once discovered, it was hoped that oil “might be the salvation of Galicia…. Metaphors emphasizing the enlightenment to be expected from this new product… were plentiful” (12). Yet, this enlightened version of Galicia did not manifest. Between a lack of interest in the territory, and a desire to cultivate the loyalty of Polish nobles, libertarian policies of the Habsburgs were implemented.

As Larry Wolff puts it in his review of Oil Empire, “Vienna itself… was regarded as an undesirable foreign influence in Galicia, even though imperially central controls might have been highly beneficial to the oil industry” (Wolff, 162). When entrepreneurs entered Galicia, their greed led to an overproduction of oil that led to a dramatic drop in the price of oil. Later, during World War I, a lack of infrastructure prevented the much-needed oil from getting to its desired destination.

Frank also includes a description of the inhabitants of Galicia as being divided among cultural, ethnic, religious, and linguistic barriers, rather than along barriers of class. “Oil workers existed as a coherent group only in the minds of those who tried to use them to further their own agendas…. The closer one looks, the less surprised one can be by a lack of worker ‘solidarity’” (253). Frank describes the destruction of Galicia through the lens of the Polish-Ukrainian war, which pitted Polish forces against Ukrainian (or Ruthenian) forces in order to secure the seemingly oil-rich region of East Galicia. In truth, by this time the oil in Galicia was all but dried up. In short, Frank’s vision of Galicia portrays an industry ripe with potential that ends up self-destructing through the mismanagement of the industry by a combination of governmental and entrepreneurial entities, as well as through the cultural clashes that existed between Galicians.

Other Work Cited
Larry Wolf, “Oil Empire: Visions of Prosperity in Austrian Galicia,” European History of the American Historical Association, Vol. 40, No. 1 (March, 2007): 162
Makaitist
One of the most informative books of its kind, "Oil Empire" describes technical, political, and environmental aspects of the impact of rampant resource exploitation on a locale -- and the world at large.
Blackstalker
So much history I did not know. Good read.
Jogrnd
A detailed history that could have been greatly improved with figures and photos in the Kindle version. Referring the Kindle reader to see photos in the print version is very disappointing.
Keel
This book is a rare historical work which combines readability and depth of insight. While I have read others that also achieve this mark, OIL EMPIRE is one of the few that does so and still maintains the specificity of an academic work. At times I found the author violated Orwell's dictum to use the simplest vocabulary to convey an idea, but this did not distract from the pleasure of reading this book. I tend to focus more on classical histories, and new nothing about the history of Galicia before I started, but I found the the author was able to situate her research so that this was not a problem. When I finished the book I was reminded of the old saying that to understand a large problem we must first understand a small problem. After the events of 9/11 it is no longer just the leftists who assert that control of the oil economy is at the heart of our foreign policy. This book provides a case study of how the same ambitions that we have today were played out on a smaller scale at the turn of the last century. I look forward to seeing what the author has in store for her next work.