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by Kevin BROWNLOW
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Industries
  • Author:
    Kevin BROWNLOW
  • ISBN:
    043607110X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0436071102
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Martin Secker & Warburg Ltd; Reprint edition (1969)
  • Pages:
    608 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Industries
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1303 kb
  • ePUB format
    1876 kb
  • DJVU format
    1875 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    769
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Introduction - The primitive years - Early days at Vitagraph - The experimenters - Early Hollywood - From Birth of a nation to Intolerance - Directors - .

Introduction - The primitive years - Early days at Vitagraph - The experimenters - Early Hollywood - From Birth of a nation to Intolerance - Directors - .

The Parade's Gone B. .We’d love your help by Kevin Brownlow.

This item:The Parade's Gone B.Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Kevin Brownlow's love of film, and especially the Silent Films, brought forth this invaluable book published in the 1960s

This item:The Parade's Gone B. Kevin Brownlow's love of film, and especially the Silent Films, brought forth this invaluable book published in the 1960s. He was able to interview many of the pioneers of the film industry while they were still alive-at a time when so many had already been forgotten by both the public & their own industry. Digital restoration of early silent films has now shown us how well-made & beautifully photographed many of them were. It's a shame this book is out of-print, but film lovers & future filmmakers alike will find it enthralling & educational.

Simple download ebook The parade’s gone by. for tablet - Free Books Online. Download more by: Kevin Brownlow. Find and Load Ebook The parade’s gone by.

by Kevin Brownlow (Author). The magic of the silent screen, illuminated by the recollections of those who created it. Awards. A part of the top 100 books on Hollywood and the movies, Book Collectors of Los Angeles.

By (author) Kevin Brownlow. This book attempts to correct the distortions, for the silent era was the richest in the cinema's history

By (author) Kevin Brownlow. This book attempts to correct the distortions, for the silent era was the richest in the cinema's history.

Kevin Brownlow did us all a service by interviewing people still living that were connected to the film indusrty .

Kevin Brownlow did us all a service by interviewing people still living that were connected to the film indusrty during the silent era, then getting the book published in the late 1960s. I have read it several times since purchasing it in 1970, always finding a new enthusiasm for a particular director or star of the silent films

US government Brownlow Committee. In Fiction Mr. Brownlow is a fictional character from Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist Charles Brownlow (The Bill).

US government Brownlow Committee. Clara Bow - in Rough House Rosie (1927) Born Clara Gordon Bow July 29, 1905(1905 07 29) Brooklyn, New York, .

Brownlow's first book on silent film, The Parade's Gone B. was published in 1968. A Tribute to Kevin Brownlow by various friends and peers, May 2015, archived at the Wayback Machine 6 September 2015. The book features many interviews with the leading actors and directors of the silent era and began his career as a film historian. Brownlow spent many years gaining support for the restoration of Abel Gance's French epic, Napoléon (1927), a then mutilated film that used many novel cinematic techniques. Mel Novikoff Award article by Dennis Doros of Milestone Films, 2007, archived at the Wayback Machine 5 October 2013.


Crazy
The problem for the modern viewer is that sound's popularity killed its silent cousin -- not intentionally, of course, any more than VHS killed Betamax; it's just how things worked out. Business being business, the studios themselves then set about destroying many of those uselessly silent films; if they didn't, the film itself tended to ignite & burn down buildings. To appreciate silent film today takes a willful viewer: part art lover, part archeologist, he and she must not just seek out these seemingly strange films, but educate themselves on how to watch them as well. Not surprisingly, it's not a task chosen by those who simply want to pass an afternoon away from their daily cares.

Enter Mr Brownlow and his imposing awareness of all things cinematic before films talked. Most wonderfully, he realized the need to document something about silent film *before* all its participants had passed away, which makes this book not just essential but irreplaceable. Some people will say things like "If you read only one book about silent film, this is it" -- and they're right. Brownlow makes the convincing [and necessary!] argument that silent cinema is not modern film's poor cousin, nor even an embarrassing progenitor, but a peak art form in its own right. Many enthusiasts of film's first few decades will even argue that silent is the superior form of the art, and this viewer occasionally finds himself agreeing with them. This book goes a long way toward explaining why.
LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE
Because so many films of the silent era have been lost or are damaged or projected at the wrong speed (24fps instead of 16fps) the general public's notion of them is a bit skewed. Kevin Brownlow's love of film, and especially the Silent Films, brought forth this invaluable book published in the 1960s. He was able to interview many of the pioneers of the film industry while they were still alive--at a time when so many had already been forgotten by both the public & their own industry. Digital restoration of early silent films has now shown us how well-made & beautifully photographed many of them were. It's a shame this book is out of-print, but film lovers & future filmmakers alike will find it enthralling & educational.

As an aside, Brownlow is featured in a fascinating new book A Thousand Cuts: The Bizarre Underground World of Collectors and Dealers Who Saved the Movies all about the underground world of film collectors & how their passion for film led to so many classics being saved.
The Sphinx of Driz
This book is on silent pictures, centered on interviewing people who were there when cinema started to raise and Hollywood was created, which makes it incredibly interesting. Some chapters are on people who had already died but had an undenied influence on the developing of moving images to progressively elaborated silent pictures, as D,W. Griffith, Cecil B. DeMille or Douglas Fairbanks. Forgotten names are also given credit, as Edward Slomon or William deMille, most of whose pictures are lost. Directors, actors and technicians are reunited. Henry King, Allan Dwan or William Wellman, Gloria Swanson, Mary Pickford, and lesser known people in the editing, title, scenario setting or lighting processes are all there.
One of the best qualities about this book, full of anecdotes and interesting people, is its lack of criticism, which (with one exception) leaves the reader the freedom of creating his/her own opinion. It is written with interest and respect, and in a time (the sixties) when it was much necessary that someone cared to preserve these memories, because many of those people were still alive to ask and look back to a past we can now only read about.
A highly rewarding reading.
Phain
Great book about how silent movies were actually made. It's pretty amazing how slapdash they were - just hiring random people off the street to make movies. One interview is with a woman who got hired to write scripts at the age of *12* - and it's interesting how many women were involved before filmmaking got to be a "man's job." There's plenty of perspective from people who were not "stars" - cameramen, PA's and the like, which I find fascinating.
Nidora
Kevin Brownlow's great book on the silent film world is over thirty years old but holds up well. Browlow is a British writer who was able to interview many of the silent film people while he gained first hand knowledge on their contributions to a lost world.
Each chapter of the book deals with either a famous actor/director of the era or covers an aspect of fliming.
Brownlow has outstanding chapters on such luminaries as D.W.
Griffith, Buster Keaton, Harold Lloyd, Abel Gance, Irving Thalberg, Gloria Swanson. C.B. DeMille Mary Pickford/Doug Fairbanks as well as several others.
His chapter on the making of Ben-Hur is a classic account of the making of this great film. Brownlow deals in other chapters with the lives of stunt-mens, silent comedy, the importance of the art director/production personnel as well as letting us see how the medium has grown technically over the decades.
If you read one book on the silent film era this should be the one to do it for you. A college course on film should include this outstanding work.
Kevin Brownlow loves movies and has done a superb job in this
page turning tour of silent movieland. As Charlie Chaplin walks through our memories as the little Tramp so too will this fine
book shine in our memories as we thank Brownlow for a beautiful trip through the splendors of early moviemaking.