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by Daniel Yergin
Download The Commanding Heights: the Battle Between Government & the Marketplace That Is Remaking the Modern World fb2
Economics
  • Author:
    Daniel Yergin
  • ISBN:
    0684848112
  • ISBN13:
    978-0684848112
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Free Press; Touchstone ed edition (February 23, 1999)
  • Pages:
    464 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Economics
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1243 kb
  • ePUB format
    1739 kb
  • DJVU format
    1467 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    957
  • Formats:
    docx mbr txt doc


The "commanding heights," according to Pulitzer Prize-winner Daniel Yergin and international business advisor Joseph .

The "commanding heights," according to Pulitzer Prize-winner Daniel Yergin and international business advisor Joseph Stanislaw, are those dominant enterprises and industries that form the high economic ground in nations around the globe. In their analysis of the new world economy, The Commanding Heights: The Battle Between Government and the Marketplace That Is Remaking the Modern World, they examine "the individuals, the ideas, the conflicts, and the turning points" that are responsible.

The Commanding Heights: The Battle for the World Economy is a book by Daniel Yergin and Joseph Stanislaw first published as The Commanding Heights: The Battle Between Government and the Marketplace That Is Remaking the Modern World in 1998. In 2002, it was adapted as a documentary of the same title and later released on DVD. The Commanding Heights attempts to trace the rise of free markets during the last century as well as the process of globalization.

Daniel Yergin’s and Joseph Stanislaw’s The Commanding Heights strives for breadth and perspective on an issue crucial to Austrian economics: the relative power of markets and governments

Daniel Yergin’s and Joseph Stanislaw’s The Commanding Heights strives for breadth and perspective on an issue crucial to Austrian economics: the relative power of markets and governments. The authors have produced a book that is fundamentally optimistic that markets will continue to be the driving force behind world events, and that price decision-making will eventually prevail over political decision-making.

The Commanding Heights book. Daniel Yergin and Joseph Stanislaw demonstrate that words like "privatization" and "deregulation" are inadequate to describe the enormous upheaval that is unfolding before our eyes. Along with the creation of vast new wealth, the map of the global economy is being redrawn. Indeed, the very structure of society is changing.

By Daniel Yergin and Joseph Stanislaw Simon and Schuster 457 pages. What books qualify as keepers: ones that belong in your permanent collection? The Commanding Heights may be a terrific candidate, especially if your interest runs to 20th century economic history. The authors, Pulitzer Prize-winner Daniel Yergin and international business adviser Joseph Stanislaw, claim for their book's title an old military metaphor, the Commanding Heights, first used by Lenin in 1922 as a defense of the New Economic Policy.

Daniel Yergin, Joseph Stanislaw

Daniel Yergin, Joseph Stanislaw. The Commanding Heights: The Battle Between Government and the Marketplaces That Is Remaking the Modern World. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1998. Countries around the globe adopted a variety of government-managed approaches to running their economies, from the Soviet extreme and its many imitations to strategic nationalization as in Britain and labor corporatism in Germany down to government regulation in the United States

Yergin, a Pulitzer Prize winner (The Prize: The Quest for Oil, Money, and . Prediction: This will become a more important book than it really deserves to be.

The result is impressive-if the seeming overreach of the analysis is set aside.

The greatest strength of The Commanding Heights is its comprehensive portrayal of socialism’s . Those and other mistakes undermine the book.

Those and other mistakes undermine the book.

Daniel Yergin and Joseph Stanislaw demonstrate that words like "privatization" and "deregulation" are inadequate to describe the enormous upheaval that is unfolding before our eyes. New markets and new opportunities have brought great new risks as well. How has all this come about? Who are the major figures behind it? How does it affect our lives?

The author of the Pulitzer Prize-winner, The Prize, and an expert on the global marketplace explore the major changes in the global economy over the past twenty years and the opportunities they afford governments and corporations alike. Reprint. 35,000 first printing.

Dellevar
This is a wonderful history of Economics in the modern world...it is not an Economics book, but a history book from an economic standpoint. I also have the DVD collection. TRULY a wonderful book and DVD's. I have bought three copies as gifts. My Economics professor told me to buy them and he is probably one of the best professors I have ever had. It enlightens one as to Keynesian v. Austrian school economics...Keynes v. Hayek. If you want to understand the world development in the 20th Century from an economic point of view rather than a political point of view, then you also will love this book.
DrayLOVE
This is a great history. Very informative , insightful, and well written. A great discussion of the twentieth century and how e got o where we are now. Very important history and information The lessons about equality, importance of caring for our environment, and confidence have a strong message in 2018.
Ichalote
Both the book DVD are excellent. It is one thing to have lived through global change, it is another thing to understand the interconnections and long-term effects. The focus in several countries is a centrally planned or market-driven economy. Chile, Argentina, Bolivia, China and the United Kingdom are examined in detail for their success and failure. The Soviet Union - Russia, tried to retain dictatorial control and continues to have problems. The "Chicago School of Economics" celebrates its wisdom, models and planning in country after country. However, in every country and economics system, the sustainable natural resource base is overlooked. Keynes may be the "father" of market economics, but Keynes is a short-term perspective. We are approaching Peak Oil and Peak Water and 6.6+ billion people all striving for a USA standard of living. The USA standard of living is based on cheap oil and cheap water and we are entering the "Crude Awakening."

Commanding Heights is an appropriate title, reinforced by knowledgeable people from Harvard, Washington DC and around the world. Commanding heights are about to come tumbling down in country after country as human population exceeds carrying capacity and countries compete for resources and food. The authors did an excellent job, but need to follow-up in light of resource, water and food limits.
Golden Lama
A must-read if you are curious about why socialism doesn't work as well as capitalism, even though no system is perfect.
Thetalune
Having read The Prize I was disappointed in the story telling but that could be because I come from an oil producing country and oil is central to our lives. The Commanding Heights does not have such an exciting cast of characters as the oil business did: Churchill, Gulbenkian, Rockefeller, Detering, and Lydia Pavlova to name a few.

That said, the book is an educational review of the changing political economy of the world, a change away from command and control toward free markets. Although the authors clearly favor free markets which have created much more wealth and well being for a huge portion of the population than command and control ever did, they manage to remain objective about the dangers that markets pose. This objectivity is most clearly shown in the last chapter where they talk about the critical tests required to judge the results that markets bring.

Not all markets are created equal. For example, the supposed deregulation of the California energy market was a fiasco because that market was badly designed. To get a better understanding of markets I suggest reading John McMillan's Reinventing the Bazaar, a Natural History of Markets.

My country was mostly bypassed by the move to a market economy. Reading the book I felt as if I were living in an alternate universe. In the early 1990s the local telco was privatized and that was about the end of it for us. When the president tried to raise the price of gas at the pump, he was impeached on trumped up charges. His own party turned against him. As a result, we have moved backwards from an economy based on import substitution to a quasi dictatorship with price controls and the destruction of private enterprise. These are the dangers of trying to move to market economies without first preparing the population for the inevitable pain that comes with the change. Unfortunately, The Commanding Heights does not cover the failures, only the success stories. Talking about failures, Russia is fast moving back to autocratic management of the economy mostly by Putin's KGB cronies, another failure where markets are not being given a chance.

To sum up, the book is worth reading but it is no thriller, be prepared to work you way through it.
Bynelad
looking forward to reading this!
Dori
Following "The Prize," Dan Yergin takes on the entire world economy and deftly distills the important from the irrevelant. This is an excellent analysis and a reasonably easy read. It is markedly superior to a "competing" work: "The Lexus and the olive tree." Business students can find a good introduction to the struggle between free and fair trade.
This is as painless an education on world 20th century political economy as possible. It is very interesting, providing a lot of good intellectual background to the major events and excellent descriptions of the events themselves. The book places excessive emphasis on Hayek, who was an important figure representing a strong "pro-market" voice in economics, but probably less important than Friedman and no more important than several others. The "conflict" bewteen Hayek and Keynes is somewhat overstated. However, this is an excellent book and the corresponding DVD is also very good.