» » Yankee Don't Go Home!: Mexican Nationalism, American Business Culture, and the Shaping of Modern Mexico, 1920-1950 (The Luther H. Hodges Jr. and ... Entrepreneurship, and Public Policy)

Download Yankee Don't Go Home!: Mexican Nationalism, American Business Culture, and the Shaping of Modern Mexico, 1920-1950 (The Luther H. Hodges Jr. and ... Entrepreneurship, and Public Policy) fb2

by Julio Moreno
Download Yankee Don't Go Home!: Mexican Nationalism, American Business Culture, and the Shaping of Modern Mexico, 1920-1950 (The Luther H. Hodges Jr. and ... Entrepreneurship, and Public Policy) fb2
Economics
  • Author:
    Julio Moreno
  • ISBN:
    0807828025
  • ISBN13:
    978-0807828021
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    The University of North Carolina Press; New edition edition (October 27, 2003)
  • Pages:
    336 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Economics
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1451 kb
  • ePUB format
    1446 kb
  • DJVU format
    1370 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    271
  • Formats:
    docx lit mobi rtf


Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Yankee Don't Go Home! will become an essential starting point for future studies of Mexico's encounter with globalization.

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Yankee Don't Go Home! book. In the aftermath of the 1910 Mexican Revolution, Mexican and .  .

Julio Moreno During the 1920s, Mexican advertising representatives formed the National Association of Advertising (ANP) to professionalize their industry broadly along the lines o.

This study of consumer culture in post-revolutionary Mexico by Professor Julio Moreno of the University of San Francisco explores an important but understudied subject. During the 1920s, Mexican advertising representatives formed the National Association of Advertising (ANP) to professionalize their industry broadly along the lines of their .

University of San Francisco professor Julio Moreno opens his book Yankee Don’t Go.

University of San Francisco professor Julio Moreno opens his book Yankee Don’t Go Home with a description of Sears Roebuck’s grand opening in Mexico City and a question: Why was Sears so successful at entering the Mexican market a few years after popular nationalism drove American companies out of Mexico (p. 1)? .

The Luther Hartwell Hodges series on business, society, and the state. 0807828025, 0807854786. What are reading intentions? Setting up reading intentions help you organise your course reading. It makes it easy to scan through your lists and keep track of progress. Here's an example of what they look like: Your reading intentions are also stored in your profile for future reference. How do I set a reading intention.

In the aftermath of the 1910 Mexican Revolution, Mexican and .

Demers, Maurice, 2005. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2003. xi + 321 pp. ISB," Enterprise & Society, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(01), pages 160-162, March.

In the aftermath of the 1910 Mexican Revolution, Mexican and U.S. political leaders, business executives, and ordinary citizens shaped modern Mexico by making industrial capitalism the key to upward mobility into the middle class, material prosperity, and a new form of democracy--consumer democracy. Julio Moreno describes how Mexico's industrial capitalism between 1920 and 1950 shaped the country's national identity, contributed to Mexico's emergence as a modern nation-state, and transformed U.S.-Mexican relations.According to Moreno, government programs and incentives were central to legitimizing the postrevolutionary government as well as encouraging commercial growth. Moreover, Mexican nationalism and revolutionary rhetoric gave Mexicans the leverage to set the terms for U.S. businesses and diplomats anxious to court Mexico in the midst of the dual crises of the Great Depression and World War II. Diplomats like Nelson Rockefeller and corporations like Sears Roebuck achieved success by embracing Mexican culture in their marketing and diplomatic pitches, while those who disregarded Mexican traditions were slow to earn profits. Moreno also reveals how the rapid growth of industrial capitalism, urban economic displacement, and unease caused by World War II and its aftermath unleashed feelings of spiritual and moral decay among Mexicans that led to an antimodernist backlash by the end of the 1940s.