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by Asli Demirguc-Kunt,Ross Levine
Download Financial Structure and Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Comparison of Banks, Markets, and Development fb2
Economics
  • Author:
    Asli Demirguc-Kunt,Ross Levine
  • ISBN:
    0262041987
  • ISBN13:
    978-0262041980
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    The MIT Press; 1st edition (December 1, 2001)
  • Pages:
    443 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Economics
  • Language:
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    1293 kb
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    1956 kb
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    1360 kb
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    4.4
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    961
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Demirguc-Kunt and Levine use newly collected data on a cross-section of roughly 150 countries to illustrate how financial . Demirgüç-Kunt, Asli and Levine, Ross Eric, Bank-Based and Market-Based Financial Systems: Cross-Country Comparisons (July 1999).

Demirguc-Kunt and Levine use newly collected data on a cross-section of roughly 150 countries to illustrate how financial systems differ around the world.

Asli Demirguc-Kunt, Ross Levine. Assessment of the ties between financial structure and economic growth, based on data from a broad cross-section of countries.

Financial Structure and Economic Growth . Asli Demirguc-Kunt and Ross Levine. Motivation and Scope.

Financial Structure and Economic Growth: Perspectives and Lessons. In Financial Structure and Development, Raymond W. Goldsmith (1969) sought to accomplish three goals. Thus, he sought to trace the evolution of. the structure of national financial systems as economies.

Ross Levine, Asli Demirguc-kunt. This is the first broad cross-country assessment of the ties between financial structure-the mix of financial instruments, institutions, and markets in a given economy-and economic growth since Raymond Goldsmith's 1969 landmark study. Most studies focus on developed countries and compare bank-based and market-based systems devamı.

Financial Structure and Development. This paper analyzes how the effect of bank concentration on economic growth varies across countries depending on bank regulation, supervision, and institutions. Results for 84 countries over the 1980-2004 period indicate that bank concentration generally has a negative effect on economic growth, an effect that disappears in countries with poorer-quality institutional environments consistent with the idea that bank concentration contributes more to the development of lending relationships with borrowers in countries where the poor quality of institutions.

Asli Demirgüç-Kunt, Ross Levine . Asli Demirg -Kunt is Director of Development Policy in the World Bank's Development Economics Vice President and Chief Economist of the Financial and Private Sector Development Network (FPD). Библиографические данные. Financial Structure and Economic Growth: A Cross-country Comparison of Banks, Markets, and Development FINANCIAL STRUCTURE AND ECONOM The MIT Press.

This is the first broad cross-country assessment of the ties between financial structure-the mix of financial instruments, institutions, and markets in a given economy-and economic growth since Raymond Goldsmith's 1969 landmark study. Most studies focus on developed countries and compare bank-based and market-based systems. Debates over the relative merits of the two systems have relied on case studies of Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States, countries with similar long-run growth rates.

The book contains recently acquired cross-country data from almost 150 .

The book contains recently acquired cross-country data from almost 150 countries. It also incorporates information on each country's political, economic, and social environment. Ross Levine is the Willis H. Booth Chair in Banking and Finance at the University of California, Berkeley, and Senior Fellow at the Milken Institute.

Levine (1999) and Demirguc-Kunt and Maksimovic (1999) conduct these analyses in companion papers. Section III defines financial structure empirically and provides cross-country comparisons. In Section IV, we examine the legal, regulatory, tax, and policy determinants of financial structure. We summarize the findings in Section V.

This is the first broad cross-country assessment of the ties between financial structure—the mix of financial instruments, institutions, and markets in a given economy—and economic growth since Raymond Goldsmith's 1969 landmark study. Most studies focus on developed countries and compare bank-based and market-based systems. Debates over the relative merits of the two systems have relied on case studies of Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States, countries with similar long-run growth rates. The absence of data on developing countries limits the usefulness of such studies for policy makers. The book contains recently acquired cross-country data from almost 150 countries. It includes information on the size, efficiency, and activity of banks, insurance companies, pension and mutual funds, finance companies, and stock and bond markets. It also incorporates information on each country's political, economic, and social environment. The chapters contain a mix of case studies, cross-country studies, macro- and micro-oriented approaches, and analytical and empirical work. The conclusions point not to markets versus banks, but to markets and banks. It is how well a financial system functions that is critical for long-run economic growth. The research suggests that strong legal rights for outside investors and the overall efficiency of contract enforcement are effective tools for developing the financial sector and the economy. The book includes a CD containing World Bank data.