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by Charles P. Kindleberger
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Economics
  • Author:
    Charles P. Kindleberger
  • ISBN:
    0333670396
  • ISBN13:
    978-0333670392
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Palgrave Macmillan; 3Rev Ed edition (November 8, 1996)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Economics
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1667 kb
  • ePUB format
    1683 kb
  • DJVU format
    1181 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    463
  • Formats:
    azw mobi lrf rtf


Charles P. Kindleberger was the Ford Professor of Economics at MIT for thirty-three years. He is a financial historian and prolific writer who has published over thirty books. Manias, Panics, and Crashes is his most popular book.

Charles P. ROBERT ALIBER is a Professor of International Economics and Finance at the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, where he has been a faculty member since 1965.

Manias, Panics, and Crashes book. Charles Kindleberger's brilliant, panoramic history revealed how financial crises follow a The best known and most highly regarded book on financial crises

Manias, Panics, and Crashes book. Charles Kindleberger's brilliant, panoramic history revealed how financial crises follow a The best known and most highly regarded book on financial crises. Financial crises and speculative excess can be traced back to the very beginning of trade and commerce. Since its introduction in 1978, this book has charted and followed this volatile world of financial markets. Charles Kindleberger's brilliant, panoramic history revealed how financial crises follow a nature-like rhythm: they peak and purge, swell and storm.

Kindleberger, Charles Poor, 1910–2003 Manias, panics, and crashes: a history of nancial crises, Charles P. .More manias, panics, and crashes may plague us, but readers of this book will at least have been inoculated. Kindleberger. 5th ed. p. cm. ISBN 978-0-471-46714-4 (pb. 1. Financial crises. KINDLEBERGER was the Ford Professor of Economics at MIT for 33 years

both timely and timeless. CHARLES P. KINDLEBERGER was the Ford Professor of Economics at MIT for 33 years. He was a financial historian and prolific writer who has published 30 books.

Charles Poor "Charlie" Kindleberger (October 12, 1910 – July 7, 2003) was an economic historian and author of over 30 books. His 1978 book Manias, Panics, and Crashes, about speculative stock market bubbles, was reprinted in 2000 after the. His 1978 book Manias, Panics, and Crashes, about speculative stock market bubbles, was reprinted in 2000 after the dot-com bubble. He is well known for hegemonic stability theory. He has been referred to as "the master of the genre" on financial crisis by The Economist.

Manias, Panics, and Crashes The best known and most highly regarded book on market crisis, Manias, Panics . He is a financial historian and prolific writer who has published over 24 books.

Manias, Panics, and Crashes The best known and most highly regarded book on market crisis, Manias, Panics, and Crashes is entertaining, exhaustive, and thoroughly engaging. Since its introduction in 1978, it has charted a new landscape in the volatile world of financial markets. Charles Kindleberger′s brilliant, panoramic history revealed how financial crises follow a nature–like rhythm: they peak and purge, swell and storm.

A recent Wall St Journal article described this book as a must read classic for anyone involved in financial markets

A recent Wall St Journal article described this book as a must read classic for anyone involved in financial markets. I have been involved directly in financial markets in two ways recently. Kindleberger (1910 – 2003) was the Ford Professor of Economics at MIT for 33 years. Robert Aliber is Professor Emeritus of International Economics and Finance at the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, where he has been a faculty member since 1965. Bibliografische Informationen.

To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. How did you like the book?

To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. On the bookshelvesAll.

Manias, Panics, and Crashes. CHAPTER 1. Financial Crisis: A Hardy Perennial. There is hardly a more conventional subject in economic literature than financial crises

Manias, Panics, and Crashes. There is hardly a more conventional subject in economic literature than financial crises. If few books on the subject have appeared since World War II, following -the spate of the 1930s, it is because the industry of producing them is anticyclical in eharacter, and recessions from . 45 to 1973 were few, far between, and exceptionally mild. More recently, with the worldwide recession of . 74-75, the industry has picked up.


Wafi
I bought this three years ago and it has shaped my investing greatly. My goal in investing is always to buy low and sell high. This book helps me understand how to do the first half--buying low. I now buy after crashes.

Interestingly, something somewhere is always crashing. And I have also used Kindleberger to size up what are obvious manias (easy one: there are now more construction cranes in Toronto than any other city in North America). Places where I have bought after crashes are Greek shipping companies in January 2013 (42% gain in 12 months even including a stock that went from $70/share to $0.11/share) and Indian small caps in August of 2013 (up ~30% gain in 5 months), the US housing market in 2012, and a small bank whose shares went from $300, to $1, to $11 (counting reverse splits).

I have proven that you can still lose money even buying after a big fall (US Treasurys)--so I am not touting Kindleberger as a panacea. it is far from clear how to get the timing right during or after a crash. But this book did a great job illuminating the crazy ways people can cause a good or a stock to part from reality both on its way up and on its way down. Using it, I succeed more often than I fail. And I succeed more often than if I had not read it.

I would place this book on the short list, with Taleb's, Lefevre's, and Malkiel's work if you invest for yourself.
Mash
This book was informative and gives a detailed history of financial crises going back to the 17th century. I would say that an understanding of the principles of macroeconomics will make this book a more digestible read as it refers to economic frameworks. Seemed a little long-winded at times and the book didn't seem to have the best chapter-to-chapter transitions.

I would concur that this is a book that should be referred to every few years. For example, speculative investing & expansion of credit gave way to the Housing Bubble; these topics are covered extensively in the book (albeit written before the pop of the Housing Bubble). It will be interesting to come back to this book as the next couple of economic cycles play out given our nations leverage levels and the implications of expansionary monetary policy (Kindleberger highlighted that Debt/GDP levels should be healthily around <60-70%).
Coron
I bough this sixth edition right after it came out and then read a but and then put it back on my shelf for some reason. I though when I bought it would be more a sequential history and not a larger arc looking at crashes and their causes, but I was rewarded coming back to it. I'm just glad that we have the problem of crashes solved after 2008 and there's no worry or possibility of another one (unless crashes are inherent in the economic system, and as explored here even more likely in the current incarnation of capitalism).
Clandratha
This is an exhaustive review of the exciting episodes in financial history beginning with the 1770's South Pacific Bubble and the Tulip Bubble, and moving to close to the publication date. This is history we should all know to intelligently discuss modern financial issues. We forget that in the 1890's the USA went through a decade of recession and depression. We forget that before the "Great Depression" there were cycles of mania and depression from post our Civil War to 1937. We forget that Argentina and Sweden went through recessions in the 1990's. How they came out of their recessions is instructive. As we forget, we are denied the lessons history can teach us. The "game" between government and bankers, with the bankers racing to devise new systems, plans, deals, and the government moving a little slower, but close behind keeping things legal and fair, and protecting the public, actually started in the Western World about 1300. With the removal of "interest" or as then called "increase" from the list of sins, came investments and borrowing and eventually the rise of the Middle Class. Also came banking systems. And the "game" or "race" was on. This book lays out the history of this game clearly and in detail. Neither side will like how that are portrayed in this book. But history is not always pretty. The book is a bit of a long read, and at times, redundant and tedious. But the lessons are important. Excellent book, well worth the effort to read.
Saberdragon
This book is, at best, only a partially coherent rambling of policy ideas, history, economic theory, and politics across a much-too-broad range of time. Much better examples of books that address the same topics -- this is really just an amalgamation of loosely-linked theories of a professor who seems to write for the sake of writing rather than to demonstrate that he has anything meaningful to say. Would definitely be better served by a better editor
BlessСhild
Buy it. Study it. This book will build your frame of reference with regard to economic history, which is of paramount necessity should you be making any investment decisions. When you know history More broadly, as well as specifics of certain circumstances you become less susceptible to BS peddled by so many people today, and always. whether they are good people who only Know enough to spout off a few buzz words, or con men who are trying to swindle you etc. Knowing the information in this book will enable you to think for yourself and remain clear headed when other people are being reactive or tying to convince you of something. You'll be able to simply thank people for their advice, without necessarily being governed by their opinions.