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by Ramez Naam
Download The Infinite Resource: The Power of Ideas on a Finite Planet fb2
Economics
  • Author:
    Ramez Naam
  • ISBN:
    161168255X
  • ISBN13:
    978-1611682557
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    UPNE; First Edition edition (April 9, 2013)
  • Pages:
    364 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Economics
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1686 kb
  • ePUB format
    1257 kb
  • DJVU format
    1976 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    164
  • Formats:
    txt azw mbr doc


The Infinite Resource is an intelligent and responsible analysis, presented in lively prose; it should be required reading for . I just read another book on this same general idea, the critical role of innovation and the exchange of ideas

The Infinite Resource is an intelligent and responsible analysis, presented in lively prose; it should be required reading for all global thinkers and leaders. Steven Pinker, author of The Better Angels of Our Nature. I just read another book on this same general idea, the critical role of innovation and the exchange of ideas. I really like "The Infinite Resource: The Power of Ideas on a Finite Planet" by Ramez Naam. Ideas and innovations truly are an infinite resource, and Naam believes (as do I) that in most situations, market forces are the most effective way to implement ideas and solve problems.

The Infinite Resource book. When CFC's were seen as the culprit in the development of the "ozone hole", industry claimed that corporations would go bankrupt trying to remedy the problem. Even the EPA claimed it would be a costly problem to correct. But it turned out that the solution was far cheaper than even that claimed by the EPA.

In this remarkable book, Ramez Naam charts a course to supercharge innovation - by changing the rules of our economy - that can lead the whole world to greater wealth and human well-being, even as we dodge looming resource crunches and environmental disasters and reduce.

In this remarkable book, Ramez Naam charts a course to supercharge innovation - by changing the rules of our economy - that can lead the whole world to greater wealth and human well-being, even as we dodge looming resource crunches and environmental disasters and reduce our impact on the planet. Print version record.

The Infinite Resource: The Power of Ideas on a Finite Planet. The Infinite Resource - Ramez Naam. To back those claims up, I’ll show how new ideas have overcome physical resource limitations again and again in the past

The Infinite Resource: The Power of Ideas on a Finite Planet. Fresh water depletion. Rising commodity prices. preface a tale of. two planets. To back those claims up, I’ll show how new ideas have overcome physical resource limitations again and again in the past. I’ll show how our progress in science and technology have the potential to leapfrog us past our current challenges of energy, climate, water, food, minerals, and other resources. And I’ll show how high the true limits on this planet are.

The Infinite Resource is a clear-eyed, visionary, and hopeful argument for .

The Infinite Resource is a clear-eyed, visionary, and hopeful argument for progress. Optimism about the power of ideas offers no guarantees, as Naam is well aware; he carefully avoids complacency. Something needs to be done to stimulate our ingenuity, Naam writes. Equal parts pragmatic and inspiring, his book offers a helpful guide for that purpose. �The Intelligent Optimist, "Seattle-based writer and former Microsoft executive Ramez Naam argues that we can solve the natural-resource and environmental challenges that face us � and grow global prosperity � if we tap our most abundant resource: innovation.

Ramez Naam is one of the them, offering practical tools and illuminating the power o. Phi Beta Iota: The first person we know of to think of this was Barry Carter, with his book Infinite Wealth: A New World of Collaboration and Abundance in the Knowledge Era (n, 1999) but Alvin Toffler’s PowerShift: Knowledge, Wealth, and Violence at the Edge of the 21st Century (Bantam, 1991) was perhaps the first - and still priceless – overview of. how everything was changing in relation to information and the balance of power between the many and the few.

Ramez is here today to discuss his book, The Infinite Resource: The . Ramez Naam spent 13 years at Microsoft working on Exchange, Outlook, IE and Bing.

Ramez is here today to discuss his book, The Infinite Resource: The Power of Ideas on a Finite Planet. We are beset by an array of natural resource and environmental threats, They pose a risk to human prosperity, to world peace and to the planet itself. To improve our chances of survival we need to supercharge our process of innovation, and make smart choices for our planet and our economy. He was born in Cairo and lives in Seattle where he writes full-time.

Ramez Naam is an American professional technologist and science fiction writer. He is best known as the author of the Nexus Trilogy

Ramez Naam is an American professional technologist and science fiction writer. He is best known as the author of the Nexus Trilogy. His other books include The Infinite Resource: The Power of Ideas on a Finite Planet and More than Human: Embracing the Promises of Biological Enhancement. He is currently co-chair for energy and the environment at Singularity University

Ramez Naam's overall tone reminded me a bit of rs .

Ramez Naam's overall tone reminded me a bit of rs such as Malcolm Gladwell or Thomas Friedman. However, he was a much better writer and his points were better argued. I think it would be good for us to take the ideas in this book, and if policy makers decide to apply any or all of them, they should do so with a modicum of humility. The Infinite Resource" is a a long-form essay argument that details several dangers that humanity is facing, primarily global warming and food shortages. The format is to start with a preface about how humanity has overcome systemic problems in the past.

"Brilliant" - Ray Kurzweil

Agalas
I, on the other hand, edge towards a more cynical pessimism. I'm one of those Ramez writes of, who notice the similarities between human and virus.

That said, I take some real encouragement from his sound, well reasoned arguments and have given second thoughts to some long-held positions.

I continue to worry that our exponential technological advancement is too rapidly outpacing our more gradual moral climb from our inner ape roots. Maybe I'm wrong. For those who seek evidence that it can be accomplished, Ramez Naam makes a strong case in this excellent book.

It would probably help if many more people of all political positions would read this book. If you read it and agree with me then pass this book on to others. I certainly will.
Soustil
Just finished his other nonfiction book, More Than Human, and have to say that I'd recommend this one over that. Mr. Naam has a very positive outlook on the future of mankind and for that I want to thank him, it's a breath of fresh air. It's not all doom and gloom for our future.

Granted, he does come out with brutal honesty in the second section of the book that packs a wallop. He makes it clear that the current situation on earth cannot sustain itself. If he'd ended the book there, it would read like any other panic-inducing, end of world book. However, he goes on to say that we as humans have the capabilities to not only survive on the planet we've made for ourselves, but also improve our situation. Mr. Naam uses a lot of scientific research to back up his argument that humans are ingenious and will find out a way to survive. But we need to do so now, and soon. We have it in ourselves to make a difference.

While that last sentence may seem like a bunch of hippie nonsense, I want to make it clear that Mr. Naam's book is far from that. It reads very scientifically and he not only presents a very solid argument, but also readily backs it up with scientific examples. Everyone should read this book, whether they're an environmentalist or not. The future of our planet concerns us all.
Phalaken
I think of myself as a "rational optimist." A couple of years ago, I read and reviewed a book of that title by Matt Ridley. Ridley's central theme is the crucial role of trade in the growth of civilization and human well-being - starting with the trade of goods and services that allowed people to become specialized, resulting in more of everything for everyone. But when people learned to trade in ideas, that led to innovation, stimulating the growth of science, technology, and social institutions - things like universities, democracy, and the market economy are all inventions of the human mind (usually many human minds).

I just read another book on this same general idea, the critical role of innovation and the exchange of ideas. I really like "The Infinite Resource: The Power of Ideas on a Finite Planet" by Ramez Naam. Ideas and innovations truly are an infinite resource, and Naam believes (as do I) that in most situations, market forces are the most effective way to implement ideas and solve problems. He also believes that the major area where the market has failed is in "tragedy of the commons," situations such as pollution of air and water, over-fishing, and greenhouse gas emissions. When there is no direct cost for the use or abuse of such shared resources, these "externalities" cannot be affected by market forces. When such factors do have associated costs, these can drive innovation to find better solutions faster than (say) direct government regulation. Reduction of acid rain and the recovery of the Antarctic "ozone hole" are examples of the success of this approach. It could work for greenhouse gases, too, even if ideas like a carbon tax or carbon trade credits sound scary to some people. Even if some energy prices were to go up temporarily, it would provide the incentive for innovative people and companies to find ways to lower costs and gain a competitive advantage. Innovation needs something to work on, and when it has it, it can work fast.

Naam believes that we have plenty of resources on this planet to support 10 billion or more people in American-level affluence if we can learn to use resources more efficiently, especially the huge influx of solar energy that hits the Earth every day. Certainly "old solar" (fossil fuel) resources like oil, gas, and coal are finite. As he says, "Every solar panel built makes solar energy cheaper. Every barrel of oil extracted makes oil more expensive." He also advocates some innovations that are controversial, such as genetically modified organisms (GMO's) in the food supply and increased nuclear power as part of our energy solution. I agree with him on these points. The alternatives are worse - we need GMO's to improve yields and nutritional value, and to reduce pesticide use (and forest clearing) if we are to support billions more humans in the next 30+ years. And although we are everywhere bathed in more than enough solar energy to run the planet with safe, local, non-carbon-emitting power for billions of years, until innovation leads to more advanced storage systems for dark and windless times, solar and wind power can only be part of the energy solution. Burning more coal is bad for a number of reasons, including carbon emissions and radiation (coal plants release more radiation into the atmosphere than nuclear power plants).

I think this book is well worth reading for fresh perspectives on innovation, environmental issues, and much more. I will finish with a couple of quotes that I like:

Our problem in the near term is not that resources are in short supply. It's that we use those resources incredibly inefficiently, with side effects we have yet to eliminate.

For all practical effects and purposes, our growth is unbounded. If we choose wisely, and tap into the right resources, while acting together to put limits on the negative side effects and externalities of our actions, then we can grow for at least centuries to come, and perhaps longer.

Our only limit, for the foreseeable future, is our collective intelligence in innovating, and in putting in place the systems to guide our collective behavior.

Easier said than done, I know, and if you live in the US, such optimism may be especially hard to fathom at the moment, as the Republican controlled House of Representatives holds us all hostage in an ideologically driven federal government shutdown and threatened debt default. But I still believe that enough humans on this planet are sane and clever that we will probably make it through the next few hundred years, with more humans every year living better off than ever before. Just maybe not in the US.
Risinal
If you're interested in the future of our species and our world, Ramez Naam is an author worth following. He's informed, creative and incredibly smart, and his work offers a particularly clear eyed assessment of a variety of future risks and opportunities. I disagree with some of what he has to say (for example, the very short section in this book that deals with education), but he is absolutely the real deal, and his thoughtful, razor sharp analyses are always clear and thought provoking. His review of the power of learning, for example--as a force for reducing costs of production--is compelling and backed by an iron grasp of historical trends that he uses to derive future potential rates of change. This book gifts the reader with a portion of his own, well founded, conditional optimism.

The Infinite Resource builds a rigorous argument for substantial policy recommendations, and offers a shelter and a working space for everyone who cares about what happens next. FWIW, I also highly recommend his blog.