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by Greg Niemann
Download Big Brown: The Untold Story of UPS fb2
Biography & History
  • Author:
    Greg Niemann
  • ISBN:
    0787994022
  • ISBN13:
    978-0787994020
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (February 26, 2007)
  • Pages:
    272 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Biography & History
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1887 kb
  • ePUB format
    1805 kb
  • DJVU format
    1647 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    971
  • Formats:
    lit mbr lrf mobi


InBig Brown, Niemann successfully delivers the goods-just asUPS has been doing for 100 years. This book provides a very close and insightful look at the development and current operations of UPS.

InBig Brown, Niemann successfully delivers the goods-just asUPS has been doing for 100 years. Norm Leaper, former president,International Association ofBusiness Communicators. As a career UPSer, I thought I knew almost everything about mycompany's history worth knowing. until I read Greg Niemann'sbook, Big Brown. The author is intimately acquainted with the company and uses that knowledge to give one of the best overviews of the company to date. From the early days with founder Jim Casey to the expansion of the air service all the way to current models.

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Although its brown vans are on every block and its delivery service reaches more than 200 countries, UPS is among the world’s most underestimated and misunderstood companies. For the first time, a UPS lifer tells the behind-the-scenes story of how a small messenger service became a business giant. Big Brown examines all the seeming paradoxes about UPS: from its traditional management style and strict policies coupled with high employee loyalty and strong labor relations; from its historical anti-marketing bias (why brown?) to its sterling brand loyalty and reputation for quality.

Start by marking Big Brown: The Untold Story of Ups as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Big Brown examines all the seeming paradoxes about UPS: from its traditional management style and strict policies .

Big Brown examines all the seeming paradoxes about UPS: from its traditional management style and strict policies coupled with high employee loyalty and strong labor relations; from its historical anti-marketing bias (why brown?) to its sterling brand loyalty and reputation for quality.

UPS-Big Brown-was by then well known and yet a mystery. I never planned to do a book on UPS, though in my retirement I had written two books on Baja California. I mulled it over and realized that the company’s centennial loomed in the distance. Several supple-mental stories about UPS are printed on the author’s Web site.

Although its brown vans are on every block and its delivery service reaches more than 200 countries, UPS is among the world’s most underestimated and misunderstood companies.

Reframing academic leadership.

Big Brown: The Untold St.has been added to your Cart. Loved this book and learning about the history of UPS. It was a very easy read and I wish I had worked at UPS in the 90’s I would be rich today!

Big Brown: The Untold St. Big Brown examines all the seeming paradoxes about UPS: from its traditional management style and strict policies coupled with high employee loyalty and strong labor relations; from its historical "anti-marketing" bias (why brown?) to its sterling brand loyalty and reputation for quality. Big Brown reveals the truth about UPS, including: Why you've probably never heard of Jim Casey.

The AuthorGREG NIEMANN, a Southern California travel and outdoors writer, followed the classic UPS career .

The AuthorGREG NIEMANN, a Southern California travel and outdoors writer, followed the classic UPS career for almost thirty-five years, rising from loader, to driver, to management. Country of Publication.

Although its brown vans are on every block and its delivery servicereaches more than 200 countries, UPS is among the world’smost underestimated and misunderstood companies.

For the first time, a UPS “lifer” tells thebehind-the-scenes story of how a small messenger service became abusiness giant. Big Brown reveals the remarkable 100-yearhistory of UPS and the life of its founder Jim Casey—one ofthe greatest unknown capitalists of the twentieth century.Casey pursued a Spartan business philosophy that emphasizedmilitary discipline, drab uniforms, and reliability overflash—a model that is still reflected in UPS culturetoday.

Big Brown examines all the seeming paradoxes about UPS:from its traditional management style and strict policies coupledwith high employee loyalty and strong labor relations; from itshistorical “anti-marketing” bias (why brown?) to itssterling brand loyalty and reputation for quality.


Snake Rocking
The subtitle, "the untold story," is intriguing. Does it disclose some previously unknown facet of the company? Or does the book fail to tell the whole story? Take your pick.

The book combines aspects of an anecdotal biography with aspects of a promotional corporate history. It begins with a biographical sketch of James Emmett Casey, who founded United Parcel Service as a teenager, delivering packages on a bicycle. It is a real-life Horatio Alger story. About halfway through, the book switches to a summary description of the present-day UPS. Throughout the book, Jim Casey is used to personify the company and to serve as the glue that holds the story together. The narrative moves with an uneven, sometimes fitful pace, often revisiting time periods that were covered earlier. The story is told in a conversational style, often switching to the first person when the author includes his personal observations.

Originally, UPS was a package delivery company for department stores. Over its first 50 years, it's operations spread from Seattle to the major cities on the west coast and the northeast U.S. During the next 30 or more years, UPS changed its business from department store deliveries to an all-points service for any shipper at any location. The present-day UPS operates on a global scale, using the very latest digital technology. Throughout its 100-year life, UPS has maintained a hard-working, semi-military culture and has to a great extent achieved employee-ownership. It is an interesting and informative story. However, it does have its faults.

In its effort to make Jim Casey the personification of the company, the book gives short-shrift to the second generation of managers, particularly the ones who guided UPS out of the department store business and into the common carrier world. Further, the book understates the importance of that shift; it is presented as merely following a lucrative opportunity. The fact is that the department store delivery business was dying. Had UPS not changed its operations, it is likely that it too would have gone out of business. The book also understates the obstacles to that change. Public service regulation existed, in part, to enforce government-established monopolies - and that enforcement included prohibiting companies like UPS from competing against the previously authorized carriers. The primary opposition to UPS' change of business was not the Post Office, it was the existing authorized carriers: Railway Express, the bus companies and the film carriers. Getting approval for nationwide rights in that era was viewed as impossible but the book does not even mention Preston W. Davis, the architect of UPS operating rights miracle.

Similarly, the book fails to mention two antitrust suits that could easily have nipped UPS' new business in the bud. UPS won one of them and settled the other.

With its faults, this is still a worthwhile read.
Samugor
Am somewhat familiar with the UPS story, and after reading a couple of chapters of this book, I got the feeling that the author was more interested in giving Jim Casey credit for everything - past, present and future - that makes UPS what it was and is, than in actually presenting an even-handed evaluation of its history. And that's just silly. There were many other fine leaders who steered this company over the years, and they certainly deserved more than a footnote or an anecdote. Obviously Mr. Niemann idolized Mr. Casey - unfortunately, I think the brownest thing about this book was the author's nose. I hope in the future someone writes a more evenhanded account of this fine company.
Vut
The book is an easy read and seems to put the company in a very positive light. It is a true testament to the tried and trued believe that hard work and tenacity can and will always overcome adversity. The story of a teenage message boy building a billion dollar multi-national company is inspiring.
What I took away from the book is: The managers are the only ones getting rich at UPS at the expense of churning through overworked and exhausted hourly employees. The stock give aways for managers is a recipe for great wealth at the end of career. Meanwhile, hourly workers only get to purchase company stock at a stingy 5% discount.
Most managers at UPS work their way up. As they ascent the corporate ladder their pay and responsibilities increase. When UPS started its own airline they had to hire professional airline pilots, who also command a high salary. However, these pilots never have sorted or delivered a single package to the customer or became indoctrinated into the Brown corporate culture. The author mentions it, but tiptoes around the continued animosity of most mangers towards the pilots and the highly paid information technology professionals.
Unfortunately, the book was written before the massive Christmas service failures of 2013, so it is not discussed.
Tygolar
This book provides a very close and insightful look at the development and current operations of UPS. The author is intimately acquainted with the company and uses that knowledge to give one of the best overviews of the company to date. From the early days with founder Jim Casey to the expansion of the air service all the way to current models. I was a little disappointed to not see more related to the advent of UPS stores but otherwise there is little I could imagine not covered here. One of the problems with the book is that the author gets caught up in the details and the chapters do not flow well together. It is hard to sometimes keep track of the topics since the author jumps around while not remaining chronological. Despite these organization issues this is still an invaluable book to understanding how UPS developed and a general look at some of the issues facing supply chain managers today. Very interesting read!
RuTGamer
Book was an unrealistic representation of the real UPS. Book was in good shape and was shipped fine. Content is just not accurate in book.
Awene
The book is incredible and my experience with the seller was amazing
Dugor
Tells the story of a great company starting with a very humble beginning. You'll be very impressed with the Casey family (UPS founder) and how they have provided their employees and family with benefit programs far beyond what was expected. Also, their charitable foundations have totaled hundreds of millions of dollars over the hundred plus years since UPS began.
Great read gives insight into how a young man of humble beginnings created not just a business but a state of mind based on Grit, Hard Work and most importantly Integrity. This book delves into Jim Casey's life and how his experiences formed the core of UPS! Great read