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by Erle S. Robertson
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Medicine
  • Author:
    Erle S. Robertson
  • ISBN:
    190445562X
  • ISBN13:
    978-1904455622
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Caister Academic Press; 1 edition (April 1, 2010)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Medicine
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Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human gamma herpes virus that is best known for being the causative agent of infectious . The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human gamma herpes virus that is best known for being the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis in man. A fascinating feature of this virus is its ability to persist in the host.

and transformation and the regulation of EBV latency by viral lytic proteins Karen Sims, Abhik Saha, and Erle S. Robertson

and transformation and the regulation of EBV latency by viral lytic proteins. This book is essential reading for all EBV virologists as well as clinical and basic scientists working on oncogenic viruses. Karen Sims, Abhik Saha, and Erle S. Robertson. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects over 90% of the world's population, and like other herpesviruses it establishes a permanent latent infection in the host (Rickinson and Kieff, 2002). The native B-lymphocyte is the preferred target of EBV, which after differentiation into memory B-cells contains the latent reservoir of virus subsequent to the resolution of acute infection.

Epstein-Barr Virus book

Epstein-Barr Virus book.

The Epstein–Barr virus (EBV, sometimes abbreviated as EPV), formally called Human gammaherpesvirus 4, is one of the nine known human herpesvirus types in the herpes family.

The Epstein–Barr virus (EBV, sometimes abbreviated as EPV), formally called Human gammaherpesvirus 4, is one of the nine known human herpesvirus types in the herpes family, and is one of the most common viruses in humans. It is best known as the cause of infectious mononucleosis ("mono" or "glandular fever").

Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) was first discovered in 1964, and was the first known .

Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) was first discovered in 1964, and was the first known human tumor virus now shown to be associated with a vast number of human diseases. However, a comprehensive lens through which virus infection, reactivation and transformation of infected host cells can be visualized is yet to be formally established and will need much further investigation.

PDF Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) was first discovered in 1964, and was the first known . Hem C. Jha†, Yonggang Pei and Erle S. Keywords: EBV, latency, lytic, transformation, B-cell, epithelial cell, cancer, infection. Viral Infections in Cancer.

PDF Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) was first discovered in 1964, and was the first known human tumor virus now shown to be associated with a vast number o. .

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human gamma herpes virus that remains one of the most successful viral parasites known to man. It is the etiological agent of infectious mononucleosis and is the major biological cofactor contributing to a number of human cancers including B-cell neoplasms (. Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease and immunoblastic lymphomas), certain forms of T-cell lymphoma, and some epithelial tumors (. nasopharyngeal carcinomas and gastric carcinomas).

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was first discovered in 1964, and was the first known human tumor virus now .

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was first discovered in 1964, and was the first known human tumor virus now shown to be associated with a vast number of human diseases.

The Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), also called human herpesvirus 4 (HHV-4), is one of eight known human herpesvirus types in the herpes family . Epstein–Barr Virus: Latency and Transformation. Erle S. Robertson (2005). Horizon Scientific Press.

The Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), also called human herpesvirus 4 (HHV-4), is one of eight known human herpesvirus types in the herpes family, and is one of the most common viruses in humans. It is best known as the cause of infectious mononucleosis (glandular fever). Caister Academic Press. ISBN 978-1-904455-62-2.

Epstein–Barr virus latent antigen 3C can mediate the degradation of the retinoblastoma protein through an SCF cellular ubiquitin ligase. JS Knight, N Sharma, ES Robertson. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 102 (51), 18562-18566, 2005. EC5S ubiquitin complex is recruited by KSHV latent antigen LANA for degradation of the VHL and p53 tumor suppressors. QL Cai, JS Knight, SC Verma, P Zald, ES Robertson. PLoS pathogens 2 (10), e116, 2006.

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human gamma herpes virus that is best known for being the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis in man. A fascinating feature of this virus is its ability to persist in the host, and it is estimated that more than 95% of adults are carriers of the virus. Importantly, EBV can transform latently infected primary cells from healthy individuals into cancerous ones, thereby causing important human cancers such as B-cell neoplasms (e.g. Burkitt's lymphoma and Post-transplant lymphomas), certain forms of T-cell lymphoma, and some epithelial tumors (e.g. gastric carcinomas). Understanding viral latency, what triggers viral reactivation and the mechanism of transformation of normal host cells into malignant cells are critical for the development of strategies for the prevention and control of this intriguing virus and related cancers. In this book, expert EBV virologists comprehensively review this important subject from a genetic, biochemical, immunological, and cell biological perspective. Topics include: latent infections, EBV leader protein, EBNA-1 in viral DNA replication and persistence, EBNA-2 in transcription activation of viral and cellular genes, the nuclear antigen family 3 in regulation of cellular processes, molecular profiles of EBV latently infected cells, latent membrane protein 1 oncoprotein, regulation of latency by LMP2A, role of noncoding RNAs in EBV-induced cell growth and transformation, and the regulation of EBV latency by viral lytic proteins. This book is essential reading for all EBV virologists, as well as clinical and basic scientists working on oncogenic viruses.