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by Robert F. Schopp
Download Competence, Condemnation, and Commitment: An Integrated Theory of Mental Health Law (LAW AND PUBLIC POLICY: PSYCHOLOGY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES) fb2
Medicine
  • Author:
    Robert F. Schopp
  • ISBN:
    1557987459
  • ISBN13:
    978-1557987457
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Amer Psychological Assn; 1 edition (March 1, 2001)
  • Pages:
    291 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Medicine
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1782 kb
  • ePUB format
    1353 kb
  • DJVU format
    1578 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    650
  • Formats:
    mbr doc lrf azw


For the law to serve as a therapeutic agent, it must become more sensitive to insights from the mental health disciplines.

The thesis is that mental health law would better serve society if major efforts were undertaken to study, and improve, the role of law as a therapeutic agent. For the law to serve as a therapeutic agent, it must become more sensitive to insights from the mental health disciplines.

Part of the Law and Public Policy: Psychology and the Social Sciences Series. Author Bio. Overview. Robert F. Schopp completed a PhD in psychology and practiced clinical psychology for approximately 10 years, during which he encountered a variety of clinical circumstances that raised perplexing legal and moral questions. These circumstances involved, for example, criminal competence and responsibility, civil competence and commitment, involuntary treatment, treatment using aversive stimuli, and the management or release of individuals who had demonstrated a pattern of violent or suicidal behavior.

Competence, Condemnation, and Commitment book. Central institutions of mental health law rarely provide a clear conception of mental illness or a clear justification for the differential treatment given to those with mental illness. Central institutions of mental health law rarely. This book creates a bold new framework for examining the major intersections between legal institutions and the idea of mental illness.

Central institutions of mental health rarely provide a clear conception of mental health or a clear justification for the differential treatment given to those with mental illness.

Schopp, Robert F. Bibliographic Citation. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 2001.

Competence, Condemnation and Commitment : An Integrated Theory o. .

book by Robert F. Schopp. Competence, Condemnation and Commitment : An Integrated Theory of Mental Health Law. by Robert F.

Competence of Execution, Human Dignity, and the Expressive Functions of Punishment Presentation to the Conference of Criminal Law Professors, Rutgers University College of Law, Newark, .

Competence, Condemnation, and Commitment: An Integrated Theory of Mental Health Law (LAW AND PUBLIC . The Right to Refuse Mental Health Treatment (LAW AND PUBLIC POLICY: PSYCHOLOGY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES).

Competence, Condemnation, and Commitment: An Integrated Theory of Mental Health Law (LAW AND PUBLIC POLICY: PSYCHOLOGY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES). Adolescents, Sex, and the Law: Preparing Adolescents for Responsible Citizenship (LAW AND PUBLIC POLICY: PSYCHOLOGY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES). Roger J. R. Levesque.

Competence, Condemnation, and Commitment: An Integrated Theory of Mental Health La.

The journal is abstracted and indexed by Criminal Justice Abstracts, Current Contents, Family Index, PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus, and the Social Science Citation Index.

Central institutions of mental health rarely provide a clear conception of mental health or a clear justification for the differential treatment given to those with mental illness. This book creates a bold new framework for examining the major intersections between legal institutions and the idea of mental illness. Efforts to reconcile involuntary commitment with the right to refuse treatment are reviewed along with a compelling case for requiring as a prerequisite to commitment, a determination of decisional incompetence.