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by Leigh G. Donowitz,Leigh B. Grossman
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Medicine
  • Author:
    Leigh G. Donowitz,Leigh B. Grossman
  • ISBN:
    0683026127
  • ISBN13:
    978-0683026122
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Williams & Wilkins; Ex-library, a little pencilling, o/wise good. No d edition (October 1, 1988)
  • Pages:
    406 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Medicine
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1237 kb
  • ePUB format
    1315 kb
  • DJVU format
    1298 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    555
  • Formats:
    doc azw docx txt


Hospital-Acquired Infe. by Leigh G. Donowitz.

Hospital-Acquired Infe. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Hospital-Acquired Infection in the Pediatric Patient.

The number of nosocomial bloodstream infections due to Candida species in critically ill newborns is increasing. This pathogen may be vertically transmitted from the mother or nosocomially acquired in the nursery.

Semantic Scholar profile for Leigh Grossman Donowitz, with fewer than 50 highly . High risk of hospital-acquired infection in the ICU patient.

Semantic Scholar profile for Leigh Grossman Donowitz, with fewer than 50 highly influential citations. Leigh Grossman Donowitz, RichardP. Wenzel, John Wesley Hoyt. Critical care medicine. Patients admitted to the ICU have a higher risk of nosocomial infection than other hospitalized patients. Whereas general medical/surgical ward patients have a 6% overall risk of acquiring a. More).

by Leigh B. Grossman. There's no description for this book yet.

Hospital-acquired infection in the pediatric patient. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Hospital-acquired infection in the pediatric patient from your list? Hospital-acquired infection in the pediatric patient. by Leigh B. Published 1988 by Williams & Wilkins in Baltimore.

Hospital Acquired Infection in the Pediatric Patient. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780683026122. Release Date:April 1988.

Leigh B. Grossman, MD, Professor of Pediatrics and Chief, Division of Pediatric Infectious Disease . Dr. Grossman's book about infection control in the child is well written and informative. At a time of increased infectious risk in our nation, it is a welcome resource.

Dr. I await her sequel written for parents of children.

Donowitz, leigh g. MD; wenzel, richard p. MD; hoyt, john w. M. MD. Critical Care Medicine: June 1982 - Volume 10 - Issue 6 - p 355–357. Original Article: PDF Only. Whereas general medical/surgical ward patients have a 6% overall risk of acquiring an infection during their hospital stay, critically ill patients in the ICU have an 18% risk (p < . 01). During this 2-year study, 440 of 2441 patients admitted to an ICU developed nosocomial infections. Patients who had prolonged ICU stays and those on the obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, and general surgery services were more likely to become infected.

All patients less than 18 years of age admitted to the burn unit from January 1, 1980 to July 10, 1988, were enrolled. Charts were analyzed for age, sex, burn injury (type, depth, burn surface area), and hospital course (burn wound therapy, use of indwelling catheters or tubes, infectious complications, antibiotic use, cause of death if patient died)

Leigh B. Grossman, . graduated from Brandeis University and the Medical College of Pennsylvania and completed her Pediatric Residency and Infectious Disease and Critical Care Fellowships at the University of Virginia. She teaches at the bedside, in the classroom, nationally and internationally.

To determine through a prospective study the characteristics of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections (HAUTI) in children, 525 children subjected to bladder catheterization during a hospital admission were identified through surveillance of 12,316 admissions during a 24-month.

To determine through a prospective study the characteristics of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections (HAUTI) in children, 525 children subjected to bladder catheterization during a hospital admission were identified through surveillance of 12,316 admissions during a 24-month period. In addition 12 noncatheterized children with a documented HAUTI were identified. The clinical courses of all patients with a HAUTI were followed for at least 6 months after their last HAUTI during the study period.

Book by Donowitz, Leigh G.