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by Dr. Edmond A. Murphy MD ScD
Download The Logic of Medicine fb2
Medicine
  • Author:
    Dr. Edmond A. Murphy MD ScD
  • ISBN:
    0801855381
  • ISBN13:
    978-0801855382
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    The Johns Hopkins University Press; 2nd edition (March 18, 1997)
  • Pages:
    416 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Medicine
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1582 kb
  • ePUB format
    1121 kb
  • DJVU format
    1256 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    407
  • Formats:
    txt lrf rtf docx


by Dr. Edmond A. Murphy MD ScD (Author). The fact that Murphy speaks to us from such a high echelon is of course a major strength because the book is richly studded with gems of insight, so that almost any reader can learn a lot from this book.

by Dr. ISBN-13: 978-0801855382. I personally experienced the joy of discovery and growth every single day during the months I spent reading the book (it's amenable to being read in short sections), and I was saddened to have reached the end.

The Logic Of Medicine book.

Items related to The Logic of Medicine. 1. The Logic of Medicine. Dr. Murphy MD ScD. Published by The Johns Hopkins University Press (1997). Murphy MD ScD, Dr. ISBN 13: 9780801855382. An entirely new chapter deals with modeling. ISBN 10: 0801855381 ISBN 13: 9780801855382.

Ships from the UK. Former Library books item 3 Biostatistics in Medicine by Murphy MD ScD, Dr. Edmond . . Former Library books. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. item 1 Biostatistics in Medicine by Murphy, Edmond A. -Biostatistics in Medicine by Murphy, Edmond A. £. 0. item 2 Biostatistics in Medicine by Murphy, Edmond A. item 3 Biostatistics in Medicine by Murphy MD ScD, Dr. -Biostatistics in Medicine by Murphy MD ScD, Dr. £2. 2.

When first published twenty years ago, The Logic of Medicine presented a new way of thinking about clinical medicine as a scholarly discipline as well as a profession.

by atul gawande, MD, mph - that forcibly calls to mind just the kind of poor diagnostic practice tony murphy had railed against and attempted to put aright in his systematic coverage of the philosophy of medicine e . leading to poor individual treatment and poor public policy. A few snippets: It isn’t enough to eliminate unnecessary care.

Edmond Antony (Tony) Murphy, MD, a pioneer in the field of medical genetics and long-term . His books, The Logic of Medicine (1976) and Probability in Medicine (1979) are still often cited and remain among the seminal works in the philosophy of medicine.

His books, The Logic of Medicine (1976) and Probability in Medicine (1979) are still often cited and remain among the seminal works in the philosophy of medicine.

The Logic of Medicine. Underpinnings of Medical Ethics. Skepsis, dogma, and belief : uses and abuses in medicine.

Edmond A. Publishing: Publication: The Logic of Medicine. Principles of genetic counseling. Probability in medicine. Edmond Murphy - Writer.

Daniel A. Albert, and Michael D. Resnik. Daniel A. Albert and Michael D. Resnik, "The Logic of Medicine. Murphy," Philosophy of Science 45, no. 3 (Se. 1978): 488-490. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Extrapolation of Experimental Results through Analogical Reasoning from Latent Classes. van Eersel et al. Presidential Address, PSA 2016: An Epistemology of Scientific Practice.

Fraser Mustard, Edmond A. Murphy, Harry C. Rowsell, H. G. Downie. The American journal of medicine. Murphy, Mary E. Francis. Thrombosis et diathesis haemorrhagica. The estimation of blood platelet survival. II. The multiple hit model. The familial component in longevity. A study of offspring of nonagenarians.

When first published twenty years ago, The Logic of Medicine presented a new way of thinking about clinical medicine as a scholarly discipline as well as a profession. Since then, advances in research and technology have revolutionized both the practice and theory of medicine. In this new, extensively rewritten edition, Dr. Murphy includes changes to show how these different areas of scholarship may affect details of "the logic of medicine" without compromising its fundamental coherence.

New to this edition are discussions of the challenge of the flood of new empirical data, new ideas in genetics, molecular biology, homeostasis, pathogenesis, cancer, aging, and Alzheimer's disease. Murphy also comments on such new theoretical topics as dynamic systems, chaos, and fractals and their impact on the burgeoning fields of philosophy and practice of medicine. Written with medical students in mind, the book includes a glossary, many new examples, and problems for solutions with comments on each. An entirely new chapter deals with modeling. Clinicians and researchers will also find the principles thought-provoking and illuminating.


VariesWent
This book provides a wide-ranging survey of medical reasoning which draws extensively on insights from Western philosophy. As such, the scope is narrower than a comprehensive study of philosophy of medicine, but much broader than a dry treatment of medical reasoning.

At a more specific level, the scope can be described by listing the chapter titles. Part I deals with "medical ontology" and consists of the following chapters: words, symbols, and notions; abstraction, generalization, and analogy; definitions and tautologies; ontology of resolution, precision, and accuracy; ontology of cause; classification and diagnosis; disease and normality; and belief, disbelief, and unbelief. Part II deals with "medical epistemology" and has the following chapters: epistemology of resolution, precision, and accuracy; proof; epistemology of cause; modeling; the diagnostic process; identity by measurement; bias; and confounding.

Coverage of this extensive swath of sophisticated material is possible because the author, Edmond Murphy, is one of truly rare brilliance and erudition, probably at the 99.99th percentile or higher. He's an MD with a ScD in biostatistics, and his knowledge clearly extends far beyond these credentials, ranging across philosophy, mathematics, physics, chemistry, and the history and philosophy of science, with surprising depth in all of these areas. In other words, he's a genuine polymath. Perhaps the best way to give a sense of the author is to quote the last sentence from his biographical profile: "He [Murphy] treasures a thought, meted out by his professor of anatomy, that complete knowledge and complete ignorance are very much the same state; and he has ambitions that he will eventually attain deep ignorance, unsullied by shallow knowledge." Well said.

The fact that Murphy speaks to us from such a high echelon is of course a major strength because the book is richly studded with gems of insight, so that almost any reader can learn a lot from this book. I personally experienced the joy of discovery and growth every single day during the months I spent reading the book (it's amenable to being read in short sections), and I was saddened to have reached the end.

Yet Murphy's towering intellect is also a slight weakness because he tends to emphasize the nuances of ideas while taking it for granted that the reader has inferred the main point, so this will require many readers to work harder than they had planned, which can be frustrating. For example, here is his definition of "truth" from the glossary: "those aspects of reality that are invariant under all possible systems of enquiry conducted by all competent and reasonable minds." If you're like me, you'll initially be a bit thrown by this definition, but after parsing it you'll get the point and will appreciate how elegant and innovative it is. The entire book has this feel ...

The book contains too many ideas to allow a summary, but a general lesson is that sloppy and erroneous reasoning is common in biomedicine, so one has to be rather meticulous in order to prevent, detect, and correct these problems. Murphy gives us many intellectual tools to help us do that.

The bottom line is that this book is a remarkable achievement of rare quality, and is not to be missed by anyone interested in a sophisticated treatment of medical reasoning. I frankly think that this book will be well over the heads and beyond the patience of the overloaded first-year medical students Murphy describes as his target audience, but many other readers can benefit from this book, including reflective clinicians, biomedical researchers, philosophers of medicine, and others outside of biomedicine. To give an idea of how much I appreciate this book, I've bought three copies: one to read and highlight, another to keep in eternally pristine condition, and another to give to a physician in the family.
Yggdi
This book attempts a simplified, yet complete, account of the most basic concepts of medicine: what is a disease, what is a diagnosis and so forth. Originally it is meant for students of medical schools but it is understandable also for people having a different background, thanks to the numerous examples. It divides the subject in two parts, ontology (what we describe as existent and whether it really exists) and epistemology (which methods and logical concepts decide whether the proposed ontology is or is not correct); clearly it is not easy reading and must be studied rather than read. I found this book a very helpful introduction to the topic and it clarified many concepts that I learned only in a confuse and non-systematic way during my years in the medical school; the extensive bibliography contains good suggestions for further reading