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by Atul Gawande
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Medicine
  • Author:
    Atul Gawande
  • ISBN:
    0805063196
  • ISBN13:
    978-0805063196
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Metropolitan Books; 1st edition (April 4, 2002)
  • Pages:
    269 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Medicine
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1366 kb
  • ePUB format
    1585 kb
  • DJVU format
    1187 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    626
  • Formats:
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Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science is a nonfiction book collection of essays written by the American surgeon Atul Gawande

Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science is a nonfiction book collection of essays written by the American surgeon Atul Gawande. Gawande wrote this during his general surgery residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital and was published in 2002 by Picador. The book is divided into three sections: Fallibility, Mystery, and Uncertainty, all going in depth into the problems physicians may face when practicing a variety of procedures in medicine.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Atul Gawande is an American surgeon, writer, and public health .

He practices general and endocrine surgery at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Several years ago, Atul Gawande faced a crucial moment in his medical training.

Complications: A Surgeon'. has been added to your Cart

Complications: A Surgeon'. has been added to your Cart. Gently dismantling the myth of medical infallibility, Dr. Atul Gawande's Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science is essential reading for anyone involved in medicine-on either end of the stethoscope. Medical professionals make mistakes, learn on the job, and improvise much of their technique and self-confidence.

Complications lays bare a science. advantages in the marketplace and in science and technology have begun to erode.

Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever Complications lays bare a science. 53 MB·76,326 Downloads·New! and usefulness of the evidence being proffered.

This book is exploratory surgery on medicine itself, laying bare a science not in its idealized form but as it actually is - complicated, perplexing, and profoundly human

This book is exploratory surgery on medicine itself, laying bare a science not in its idealized form but as it actually is - complicated, perplexing, and profoundly human. Atul Gawande offers an unflinching view from the scalpel's edge, where science is ambiguous, information is limited, the stakes are high, yet decisions must be made

A Surgeon’s Notes on an Imperfect Science. The Checklist Manifesto. Seven years ago, Atul Gawande faced a crucial moment in his medical training. The student, who had never operated before, was observing an abdominal procedure when it came time to make the first incision. The patient was put under, the belly exposed. During a surgeon’s career, there is a lot of uncertainty about exactly what to do, Gawande explains. You’d love for there to be clear guidelines for everything, but that’s not the case.

Atul Gawande wrote the Complications during his surgical residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Atul Gawande wrote the Complications during his surgical residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Working approximately 110 hours a week, Gawande would have to leave his writing of his essays for the nighttime and the weekends. Fallibility in Medicine. In the writing of Complications, Gawande attempts to elucidate medicine. In many of the essays included in the book, in particular When Doctors Make Mistakes and Education of a Knife, demonstrate many of the mistakes physicians may make when treating their patients.

PDF On Sep 21, 2002, Sanjay A Pai and others published Book: Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an. .

surgeon, Atul Gawande is a staff writer on. medicine and science at The New Yorker,and. some of the essays in this volume have.

Gawande is a surgical resident in his eighth year of general training We could all do with giving this book a look doctors, surgeons and all other future patients. Matt Buchanan is a Herald journalist.

Gawande is a surgical resident in his eighth year of general training. He works in a Boston hospital. He has also been for some years a contributor to The New Yorker, in whose pages he has proved a skilled writer and a rigorous and fair-minded journalist. Complications is, in a simple sense, a compilation of these writings. The surgeon making the incision on your abdomen has never used a scalpel on a human before. The senior cardiologist is senile but won't retire. Or, somewhat less sensationally, surgeons are human, and humans make mistakes. We could all do with giving this book a look doctors, surgeons and all other future patients.

A brilliant and courageous doctor reveals, in gripping accounts of true cases, the power and limits of modern medicine.

Sometimes in medicine the only way to know what is truly going on in a patient is to operate, to look inside with one's own eyes. This book is exploratory surgery on medicine itself, laying bare a science not in its idealized form but as it actually is -- complicated, perplexing, and profoundly human.

Atul Gawande offers an unflinching view from the scalpel's edge, where science is ambiguous, information is limited, the stakes are high, yet decisions must be made. In dramatic and revealing stories of patients and doctors, he explores how deadly mistakes occur and why good surgeons go bad. He also shows us what happens when medicine comes up against the inexplicable: an architect with incapacitating back pain for which there is no physical cause; a young woman with nausea that won't go away; a television newscaster whose blushing is so severe that she cannot do her job. Gawande offers a richly detailed portrait of the people and the science, even as he tackles the paradoxes and imperfections inherent in caring for human lives.

At once tough-minded and humane, Complications is a new kind of medical writing, nuanced and lucid, unafraid to confront the conflicts and uncertainties that lie at the heart of modern medicine, yet always alive to the possibilities of wisdom in this extraordinary endeavor.

Complications is a 2002 National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction.


Uylo
I was referred to this book by a friend of mine who knew I liked the books of Malcolm Gladwell. I first read it near about when it came out, around 2002, and just got around to re-reading it. I had only remembered two of the stories from the book, so it was very similar to reading it again for the first time.

The theme of this book is reflected in its three parts: Fallibility, Mystery and Uncertainty. Each part talks about a particular aspect of Gawande’s career as a surgeon that deals with the less-certain side of being a doctor. Each concept is accompanied by one or more anecdotal references to his own real-life cases that illustrate his point brilliantly.

And that point is that doctors know a lot - but they don’t know everything. Their education and practical experience can help prepare them with knowledge, but skill comes from years of learned real-world practice. I could really sympathize with him and the stressors he has to deal with. I’ve been guilty as well of feeling my doctor must and should know everything that is right for me to do. The truth is a lot more complicated than that.

This book doesn’t even take into consideration the patient frustrations with healthcare - cost, attention, etc. It really does focus on pulling the screen back and giving you a glimpse into the vast uncertainty that accompanies this sometimes wondrous profession.

This is NOT a book that says, “I’m a surgeon. Here’s all the supercool things I’ve done and this is why I’m awesome and don’t you wish you could get me as your doctor?” This book shows the doctor, warts and all, and makes them much more human.
Pedora
The author writes from the viewpoint of a resident and young surgeon covering such topics as When Doctors Make Mistakes, When Good Doctors Go Bad, Pain, Nausea, Obesity and the Ethics involved in end-of-life decisions. His excellent writing makes the hospital setting and the O.R. come very much alive. Doctors are portrayed as human beings with a high fallibility factor and surgeons are portrayed with very high confidence levels. Yet the doubts, the anxiety and the frustrations of the medical profession are also expressed very eloquently. His insight into the medical world is almost profound and his empathy with the patient is palpable. Gawande has written other medical books for the popular market that have gotten good reviews. I hope to read them soon.
Fesho
People usually are either one of these things or the other, and it's not so often that we find someone who can both do things AND write and so expose us to a world that we might not have seen otherwise.

***What of this book?

1. It is written in three sections.
a. Fallibility (The shortcomings of physicians)
b. Mystery (Mystery Illnesses)
c. Uncertainty (Gray areas and diagnostic uncertainty)

2. I get the distinct impression that the author wrote a series of essays and then chose the best of them as could be fit into this book. It's like he didn't write only as many "songs" as he needed for this "album." He had a whole bunch of them in a vault somewhere and then just pulled some number of them together and then made the concept of the "album" after the fact.

***What can we learn from this book? Much, as it happens. I can give some of the things that popped out at me the most

1. Medicine is an empirical science. A lot of things are learned/ decided on the fly and with more information they might have been decided differently. There are no algorithms or simple answers.

2. There are questions about ways that surgeries can be set up. Do you train one surgeon to do many things, or do you train many surgeons (teams?) to do one thing only. The discussion of the hernia repair team and the way that they improved their efficiency by doing the same thing OVER AND OVER again (p. 35) is food for thought.

3. The training of physicians has to happen on *someone*. And the training for procedures to be done on humans can only be done on humans. And yes, people who are poor and unable to purchase their own insurance are more likely to be guinea pigs. And that's just the reality of things.

4. There are no clear mechanisms to sanction physicians when they are past their prime and start killing patients. This book is about 15 years old, but then (as now), government accountants and colleagues will catch the physician before any ethics/ disciplinary board.

Verdict: Recommended. The fact that this book is still high priced in spite of being 15 years old is its strongest recommendation. The present reviewer is offering one more.
Freaky Hook
As a former Navy Corpsman (Medic) attached to the USMC infantry, I have always had an interest in medicine, and science in general, and this book was a great insight into the medical and surgery field.

As a young Corpsman with the Marines, I was thrust into medicine, and learned very quickly what did and did not work. "Watch one, do one, teach one" is how we were instructed to learn medical practices. From diagnosing (even though we couldn't "diagnose" as Line Corpsmen...we still did essentially) cellulitis, learning to place sutures, to removing infected toenails, I made mistakes, but generally our medical skills quickly flourished, and we were able to practice outstanding medicine for the grunts.

Atul writes about this, and the decisions he had to make, which affect him to this day. As a surgeon and author, he actually cares about his patients, which is a great thing to have as a medical professional. While he doesn't touch on this very much in his book, his caring about the patients and following up is the mark of a true caregiver. For it is those doctors, medics, corpsmen, nurses, and other medical professionals that actually care and are empathic with their patients, yet know how to distance themselves when needed, that operate the best and can change medicine for the better.

A truly great read, I would recommend this book to anyone interested in the healthcare system, surgery, medicine, and anyone who has ever worked in the medical field!