» » JUNG: GETTING IN (P); HOW NOT TO APPLY TO MEDICAL SCHOOL: How Not To Apply to Medical School (Medical Student Survival Series)

Download JUNG: GETTING IN (P); HOW NOT TO APPLY TO MEDICAL SCHOOL: How Not To Apply to Medical School (Medical Student Survival Series) fb2

by Paul Jung
Download JUNG: GETTING IN (P); HOW NOT TO APPLY TO MEDICAL SCHOOL: How Not To Apply to Medical School (Medical Student Survival Series) fb2
Medicine
  • Author:
    Paul Jung
  • ISBN:
    0761917578
  • ISBN13:
    978-0761917571
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Sage Publications, Incorporated; 1 edition (October 22, 1999)
  • Pages:
    160 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Medicine
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1693 kb
  • ePUB format
    1578 kb
  • DJVU format
    1386 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    576
  • Formats:
    lrf lit docx azw


Getting In shows students caught in the web of medical school admissions boards how to apply to medical school the right way-setting themselves apart from the rest of the crowd

Getting In shows students caught in the web of medical school admissions boards how to apply to medical school the right way-setting themselves apart from the rest of the crowd. Jung takes pre-med and second-career aspirants through the entire ordeal and lets them know how important it is to apply as early as possible. From preparation and finding ways to obtain an application noticed by the admissions committee to information on the MCAT and getting through common interview traps, the book gives inside tips and helps applicants through what can be a stressful and uncertain time.

Know where to apply: Not all . medical schools accept international students. Medical School Admissions Doctor offers a roundup of expert and student voices in the field to guide prospective students in their pursuit of a medical education. According to 2014 AAMC data, 62 medical schools stated they would accept international students' applications. Identify the institutions that accept international applicants and find out their requirements.

How important is your major in getting into medical school? Some people think you need to major in biology or. .In fact, only 63% of students accepted to medical school majored in the physical and biological sciences in college.

Fortunately, those people are wrong. You can major in any subject you want and still get into medical school. So what is the best major for medical school? It really depends on what you're interested in.

How do you apply to Medical School in the UK? . Although as far as I know, medical schools in the UK require students to be 18 when they start. I was 17 when I sent off my application in October, but am now 18, which is really the youngest age people can successfully apply to medical school in the UK. I think last year there were over 20000 applications for 7500 places which made the success rate between 30% and 40% (for 1 offer, so its about 10 applicants to a place at a given medical school).

Applying to medical school is a multistage process, so start . Many American students apply to medical schools in Caribbean countries as part of their "safety" school strategy.

Applying to medical school is a multistage process, so start early so that you can collect and record accurate information and devote time to your admissions essay. Identifying information. This section captures basic information such as name, gender and social security and/or other identifying numbers. Take a proctored exam with other students.

How to Get Into Medical School (How We Got Into Medical School) - Продолжительность: 8:22 JaneandJady 199 152 .

So you wanna go to med school?

1 Applying as early as possible in the application cycle is extremely important! How to apply to medical school Overview workshop for Bryn Mawr undergraduates and alumnae who are thinking about applying to medical school in the summer of 2015 for matriculation in fall 2016.

1 Applying as early as possible in the application cycle is extremely important! How to apply to medical school Overview workshop for Bryn Mawr undergraduates and alumnae who are thinking about applying to medical school in the summer of 2015 for matriculation in fall 2016 September 16, 2014

Impress during the medical school admission interview. Not all universities use interviews to screen their applicants. Write down your answers and see how you could express them better. Remember, the idea is not to exaggerate or lie about something

Impress during the medical school admission interview. But if you’re university does, rejoice! We know that for many people interviews can be terrifying. Remember, the idea is not to exaggerate or lie about something. You should use your words and examples carefully so that they highlight the best things about you, not the past failures. There’s no need to deny them since each obstacle can be turned into a valuable lesson.

So you want to go to medical school, but maybe circumstances haven’t been in your favor. The easiest medical schools to get into can still offer you a quality education with lower costs and stress!

So you want to go to medical school, but maybe circumstances haven’t been in your favor. The easiest medical schools to get into can still offer you a quality education with lower costs and stress! In today’s competitive job marketplace, individuals are constantly seeking new ways to improve their career outlook and establish a sense of security for future economic downturns. More individuals are considering going back to school to further their education, to make them a more attractive candidate overall and earn more over time

The average student applies to about 13 schools to optimize their chances of getting in-I wouldn’t recommend that you put together a list much smaller than that.

The average student applies to about 13 schools to optimize their chances of getting in-I wouldn’t recommend that you put together a list much smaller than that. Both types are fully licensed physicians, and are often very similar in the way they practice medicine-they just receive degrees from slightly different types of programs.

Getting In: How Not To Apply to Medical School is a tough, practical guide for people storming the ramparts of medical school admission boards. Paul Jung takes the pre-med or second-career aspirant from pre-application experiences through the application process with a very practical approach. The book is filled with the pitfalls and misconceptions applicants frequently make, rendering the subtitle particularly apt and (for those terrified of the unknowns) eminently appealing. The volume also includes self-diagnostic sections and common pitfalls to avoid when applying to medical school. Contrary to popular belief, applying to medical school doesn′t have to be stressful and time-consuming. Getting In shows students caught in the web of medical school admissions boards how to apply to medical school the right way―setting themselves apart from the rest of the crowd. Jung takes pre-med and second-career aspirants through the entire ordeal and lets them know how important it is to apply as early as possible. From preparation and finding ways to obtain an application noticed by the admissions committee to information on the MCAT and getting through common interview traps, the book gives inside tips and helps applicants through what can be a stressful and uncertain time. The author allows readers a glimpse into common errors that others have made in their quests for acceptance, such as taking all required science courses in one semester or leaving large chunks of a medical application blank. Taking a down-to-earth, realistic approach, Jung acknowledges the pitfalls and misconceptions frequently made by applicants and even provides alternative solutions for discouraged students. The result is a well-written book that describes hardships and blunders but also gives good, practical information on how to succeed.

Tcaruieb
It is a bit expensive for what it costs. It does give some insider information from a former 'admissions advisor'. Let me save you some money, ready?... don't do the same thing everyone else does. Seperate yourself from the same things that every other 'pre-med' student does to get in... be unique... volunteer at a soup kitchen rather than a hospital, consider majoring/minoring in something other than science, do something out of the norm etc etc etc... That's it in a nut shell... you'll get a lot more of the same thing in different ways for $30 more, but hey, I'll admit that not every 'pre-med' student knows that they should try to be unique. So, it offers some good advice, but you just got it all (above) for the low low cost of nothing. So, if you're pre-med, be unique... and get a better book.
Mallador
If you're smart enough to get in to med school, you're smart enough to figure out what the title of my review means, and also smart enough to know you don't need this book.

I happen to be the S.O. of a recently accepted med school entrant, and I can tell you from a ton of research that this book will not help you any more than you can help yourself. If, perchance, you DO find this helpful, you aren't going to get in, or you are just so lazy that you haven't bothered to figure out that most of this is worthless and the few bits of info that are useful are easily available by just a few mouse clicks.

So take the 30 odd dollars and put it away for 35 years at 7% and you'll be much better off. PJ isn't helping any one but himself here.
huckman
This is a well written book, but its all stuff you already know or should know. I ended up going to law school =/
Nakora
Author Jung must have been well aware of how many nervous, neurotic premeds will throw money at anything if they think it will give them ANY sort of edge. Cha-Ching!!

Okay, so I'm already in medical school, but I had to flip through this yesterday when I saw it on a friends' shelf. Jung advises you to be original. (think "Legally Blonde" and Elle's video application to Harvard... I guess).

The best thing you can REALLY do, is make friends with the classmates AHEAD of you in undergrad, and keep communicating with them as they move through the application cycle (this works for application to ANY graduate-level course, not just medical).

Internet sources like this abound... tailor-made for students to give advice to their peers and for the people coming up behind us to read as well. Google for Student Doctor Network and you'll find FAR MORE advice, in a searchable format, readily available, for free free free.

The author is right, incidentally. Being original is a good idea. It's just neither an ORIGINAL idea (ironic!) nor one worth $30.

Now... stop reading about getting in, and go get in!!! :-)
Bu
I will admit that this book does have the occasional bit of, as far as I can tell, good information. But mostly it just gave hyper-paranoid advice in insulting language. Take chapter 15, for instance, titled "Deadline Dummies". The "dummies" to which it refers is anyone who gets their application in past June 1st. He even states that there's 'no reason' to get it in past that date. No reason? Really? So he knows my life, does he? And don't even get into April vs. August MCAT. He leaves the reader, or at least he left me, with the overall feeling that those August MCAT losers are just plain screwed. Thanks.

And then there's the downright unhelpful advice, like 'don't volunteer at a hospital if that doesn't interest you, instead spend time doing things you truly enjoy.'. Well 1) if you don't like spending time in hospitals, I have some bad news about your future in medicine, and 2) what are you supposed to tell med schools when they ask about your medical experience? These days it's nearly impossible to get into any medical without a little clinical experience beforehand. This is just bad, bad advice.

Don't buy this book. Especially not for this much money. Honestly, almost any other book is better. I recommend Kaplan's "Get into Medical School; A Strategic Approach" instead. Good luck!
Thetalune
While the author provides unique recommendations about pre-med coursework, I think there could have been more in depth information.

Perhaps the most helpful information within the book regards the coursework and majors of pre-med students. Dr. Jung presents the idea of "setting yourself apart from the other [med school] applicants" by NOT doing the cliche Biology BS degree and candystriping or other mundane volunteer work. I think that was the most insightful and refreshing information I've read regarding the med school application process.

Dr. Jung also provides BRIEF information about some unique programs at different medical school, like MD/PhD programs and the like.

The only criticism I can provide regards the comprehensiveness and depth of the book. I think it is definately a good book to start with, but it is definatly NOT comprehensive start-to-finish work. Its a very quick and easy read at only 128 pages, and left me wanting more; but, overall it was helpful.