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by J. Douglas Bremner M.D.
Download Does Stress Damage the Brain?: Understanding Trauma-Related Disorders from a Mind-Body Perspective fb2
Medicine
  • Author:
    J. Douglas Bremner M.D.
  • ISBN:
    0393703452
  • ISBN13:
    978-0393703450
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (July 17, 2002)
  • Pages:
    328 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Medicine
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1587 kb
  • ePUB format
    1776 kb
  • DJVU format
    1762 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    531
  • Formats:
    azw lit docx mbr


Start by marking Does Stress Damage the Brain? .

Anyone who has experienced even moderate stress in their life will benefit from the insights in this clearly Can what you see, hear, feel, and experience actually result in a permanent change in your brain?

by J. Douglas Bremner. Readers will join Bremner as he recounts the harrowing stories of people under stress-from WWI soldiers to Vietnam combat veterans to survivors of the September 11 terrorist attacks-and gathers evidence for his intriguing proposition that stress actually damages the brain.

Health and Disease - ▪ 2009 Introduction Food and Drug Safety. In 2008 the contamination of infant formula and related dairy products with melamine in China led to widespread health problems in children, including urinary problems and possible renal tub. Universalium. Dream - For other uses, see Dream (disambiguation).

New York: W. W. Norton. Bremner, J. D. (2003a).

Understanding Trauma. Online ISBN: 9780511500008. New York: W.

Arch Gen Psychiatry 1997, 54:233–237.

New York: WW Norton; 2002. Arch Gen Psychiatry 1997, 54:233–237. This study measured neural correlates of both traumatic perception and imagery in combat-related PTSD and found decreased inferior frontal gyrus function in addition to other findings. PubMedGoogle Scholar.

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Published April 15, 2005 by W. Norton & Company Created by an anonymous user.

An examination of whether extreme stress might result in lasting damage to the brain. Healing Trauma: Attachment, Mind, Body, and Brain

Everyone who has ever experienced stress, or wondered about the effects of stress on their minds and bodies, will benefit from the insights in this clearly written and accessible book.

Why is it that we can remember exactly where we were when John Kennedy was shot, or when the Space Shuttle Challenger exploded, or on September 11, 2001? Does what we see, hear, feel, and in other ways experience, especially during times of stress, result in permanent changes to our brains? Is this one of the reasons stressful events become seared in our memories? These provocative questions, and many others, are answered here by J. Douglas Bremner, a leading scientist whose discoveries, and that of his colleagues, showed that extreme stress may result in lasting damage to the brain, especially a part of the brain involved in memory. Readers will join Bremner as he recounts the harrowing stories of people under stress-from WWI soldiers to Vietnam combat veterans to survivors of the September 11 terrorist attacks-and gathers evidence for his intriguing proposition that stress actually damages the brain. As this book will explain, scientists now believe that stress-related brain damage may cause certain psychological disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). There are in fact a range psychological disorders related to stress, what we are now calling the 'trauma spectrum disorders,' that may be manifestations of stress-induced changes in the brain. This new understanding of trauma-related problems as essentially neurological disorders has many important implications. What a difference it would make if someone who experiences anxiety or depression realized that they were not at fault for these experiences, but rather these experiences were the result of brain-based changes as a result of stress? In certain cases, thinking about the effects of stress on the brain may help understand puzzling phenomena, like delayed recall of childhood abuse. The scope and breadth of traumatic stress today make this book especially relevant. Our country will be sorting out the many patterns of response to recent traumatic events for years to come. If knowledge is power, then all readers will benefit from a greater knowledge of the potential effects of traumatic stress on mind, brain, body, and spirit. With over ten years of experience in researching the effects of stress on people, Douglas Bremner is uniquely qualified to help us make sense of the ways in which we experience stress.

INvait
Really interesting read on a profoundly important topic, stress.
I found it easy enough to read as I enjoy this type of writing, but realize that for some, well, it may be a bit of a challenge, especially if you are accustomed to light reading.
Stress is a debilitative condition and its effects can, as the author posits, linger and have long standing consequences that may be inevident, and confusing to diagnosticians unfamiliar of untrained in recognizing what they are seeing.
PTSD, certainly, is one all too familiar manifestation of the effects of stress on the brain, but the author goes much farther in presenting the results of his research and conclusions.
Nirad
Dr. Bremner does a masterful job presenting his research and explaining others research revealing the very deleterious effects of chronic stress on brain functioning. Of particular importance is the information concerning damage to brain cells in the hippocampus which will result in learning and memory deficits. I highly recommend this book.
William H. Farrell, Ph.D.
mr.Mine
Superb book, well researched, enlightening.
Kupidon
Excellent . . . Tells it the way it really is based on my own experience.
Friert
I just presented a couple of Power Point presentations in two University classes on PTSD. Though I didn't reference his journal production or his books, I find that reading this book pulled many things together after doing the above. He is at Emory now, going there from Yale.

The hardback could have used some editing. He repeats himself almost verbatim many times, which might help somebody who just picks into stray chapters.

Anyway, you might want to check out a PPT he presented March 2007.

[...]

He frequently studies how trauma affects brain structures.
Zeks Horde
THIS IS A "MUST READ". Any one who has suffered a loss, experienced grief, been violated or exposed to violence of self or other will derive comfort, knowledge and a logical explanation for why actions, feelings, thoughts, and ideas occur subsequent to such exposure. With the events of 9/11, that includes every American and much of the world's population who if not directly there in person, will have the images the media replayed time and again burned into their conscious and unconscious minds forever. It furthermore includes victims of childhood abuse no less than combat veterans, hurricane or other natural disaster survivors along with those from any terror, war and conflict.
The answer is that scientifically demonstrated brain changes and hormonal actions do govern behaviours, feelings and actions: NO, you're not crazy for seeing or perceiving things as you do.
The changes are real. You're OK. You're part of a world that isn't as OK or safe as you'd like it to be.
Dr. Bremner puts all of it together in a delightfully readable form sprinkled with annecdotes, metaphors and analogies. He presents serious subject matter and profound insights in a style as fascinating and captivating as science fiction. I bought it for professional purposes and then read it non-stop for pleasure.
Agagamand
I picked this book up in the bookstore because of the title
and once I read the first few pages in the store I was
really hooked. The author tells a couple of different stories
in the book and I can see why one of the reviews talked
about some parts of the book that are somewhat complicated.
The brain stuff about stress is very fascinating, and most
of it is easy to understand (I don't have any more than
a high school background in science.) There were a few difficult
parts but skipping over these did not detract from the fascinating story that the author tells about how people
experience stress, what events like September 11 can do
to people, and what the future holds in terms of understanding
how to deal with stress and treat it. The author includes
in the book an excerpt from his family history detailing
some very traumatic events and I wish that he had written
more about that. Still, a short but provocative book that helps
to put many issues regarding trauma into a perspective
that is new.
good