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Download Civil Procedure (The Little, Brown examples and explanations series) fb2

by Glannon
Download Civil Procedure (The Little, Brown examples and explanations series) fb2
Rules & Procedures
  • Author:
    Glannon
  • ISBN:
    0316315966
  • ISBN13:
    978-0316315968
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Little Brown & Co Law & Business; 2nd edition (May 1992)
  • Pages:
    532 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Rules & Procedures
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1264 kb
  • ePUB format
    1278 kb
  • DJVU format
    1401 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    393
  • Formats:
    txt docx rtf doc


Series: The Little, Brown examples and explanations series. I will explain the books I used second semester, which is less theory and rules based.

Series: The Little, Brown examples and explanations series. Paperback: 532 pages. I then read through Emanuel Law Outline: Civil Procedure Yeazell (Emanual Law Outlines) skimming and highlighting the key points in this casebook and adding the extra info to my rule outlines.

Series: Little, Brown Examples and Explanations Series. The content itself seems okay

Series: Little, Brown Examples and Explanations Series. Paperback: 496 pages. Publisher: Little Brown & Co Law & Business (March 1, 1995). The content itself seems okay. The sections in the table of contents here are not clear on what tort area of the law the section pertains to, it just has cleaver titles like"interlude: pleading a personal injury case" or "The duty element.

Unquestionable effectiveness earned his civil procedure guides their . Don't wait as long as I did, and at least one class will feel a lot more comfortable. I would call this book "Civil Procedures for Dummies

Unquestionable effectiveness earned his civil procedure guides their bestselling status. 8 people found this helpful. I would call this book "Civil Procedures for Dummies. This book walks you through the topics step-by-step & is a very easy read. A wonderful change of pace from all my law school textbooks.

In the hallmark Examples & Explanations Series style, the book follows a consistent format: each chapter .

Civil Procedures book. Most case books contain major or representative cases but provide little discussion of what the cases mean or "what the law is" on a particular topic. Most case books contain major or representative cases but provide little. Start by marking Civil Procedures: Examples and Explanations as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. I hope that you will find, as my students have, that the discussion in this book helps to tie the cases together into a coherent picture of the law.

As part of the Little, Brown Examples and Explanations Series, this helpful text can be used in. .Students respond well to Glannon's distinctive practice-oriented approach, As shown by his best-selling book CIVIL PROCEDURE.

As part of the Little, Brown Examples and Explanations Series, this helpful text can be used in the classroom or for independent study. For your next Torts course, adopt or recommend Joseph Glannon's THE LAW OF TORTS: Examples and Explanations and you'll save valuable class time otherwise spent explaining the basics.

Publisher: Little, Brown and Company, 1987. Students know they can count on expert study guide author Joseph W. Glannon to clarify even the most complicated topics. Unquestionable effectiveness earned his civil procedure guides their bestselling status.

Civil Procedure (The Little, Brown examples and explanations series) Glannon, P.

Manufacturer: Little Brown & Co Law & Business Release date: 1 May 1992 ISBN-10 : 0316315966 ISBN-13: 9780316315968.

New York : Aspen Law & Business. WorldCat (this item).

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. New York : Aspen Law & Business. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

This book is case law on criminal procedure. The book has problems and outlines of every section. It is a very easy book to read and helps with the understanding of civil procedure. Good for first year law students.

Gadar
My review will mirror many of the reviews for this edition of Yeazell's Civil Procedure: Good intros, but difficult explanations to wade through for the rest. Which is where a good Professor/TA comes in.

Here are the best methods in successfully deciphering this book (and in general for law school):

Before class:
-Read Yeazell's intros (they set up the cases well)
-Read each case then read over his notes (if any exist) and any FRCP rules/sections from the Rules supplement
-Do the problems in the notes (take your best shot)
-**Optional** - For the really motivated students, you can look up the cases in law reviews or de minimis for further explanations/context. I never did this, but I've heard it helps when there's confusion.
-Prepare a case-brief while re-reading the case, incorporating the knowledge obtained from the notes
-Review 1/2 hour before class

During class/TA sessions:
-Take detailed notes! Fill in anything you might have missed/misunderstood, and anything else you deem important (especially anything the Prof. puts on the board, or writes on projectors, or asks hypos of, or gives out handouts for)
-Refer to your case-brief, and be courageous in your answer when called upon (the Socratic method is for your benefit, though it may feel like torture)
-Pay attention to how Prof/TA goes over the problems and answers
-Ask questions about anything you might have missed

After class/TA sessions (directly after-wait too long, and this stuff might fly out of your brain):
-Add condensed and important points into outline (which you will use as your study tool for finals)
-Add answers to problems into outline
-Mark up rules/sections in the FRCP Yeazell supplement pertaining to important class discussions
-**Important** - Attend office hours for Professor (or TA - but not as important b/c TA not testing you) and discuss ANYTHING you might be hazy on - Students rarely go to office hours. Those that do, get the top grades. Go figure.
-**Optional, but important** - Form study groups to go over class material/outlines/complain about CivPro
-Review material weekly

After this is complete, rinse and repeat.

Before finals:
-Finish up outline (should be almost finished before end of classes), and read over repeatedly until you're confident with materials
-Take practice exams (especially essays)
-If you have time, go over practice exams with Prof/TA/study group

Law school casebooks like Yeazell's are almost never straightforward so they require all these steps so you actively learn. If most of these steps are not taken, it will probably lead to confusion, panic, just overall bitterness from a nebulous source of education.

---advice from an overachieving 1L
Nejind
First is the review and then how I managed my study time using supplements and the FRCP. This is by far the worst text book we used during my 1L year, because after each case it has a few explanations, but typically just asks TONS of short questions W/OUT ANY answers! The purpose is to get you thinking about the topics and spend weeks figuring them out yourself. I listened to my 1st semester prof and used solely this book and the rule book (used minimally first semester). This was by far the worst advice I have ever been given, because the book will waste your precious time or make you stop reading altogether. However, there is a way to make the class interesting and gain the necessary info with minimal wasted time. Also, each semester is almost like a completely different class (one is theory and one is rules).

I used various supplements for this class. Before buying all of them (like I did) I would go to your law library and look them over, use them for your class and see if they are presented in a way that works for you. If not, then buy whatever you can that is most useful and use the library's books as needed. My biggest mistake was thinking by using supplements to supplement my casebook I would learn less or get screwed up. Professors tell you whether they like supplements or not, but if you use them to prepare for class, still at least go through the cases and take NOTES from what they say, you will do far better.

I will explain the books I used second semester, which is less theory and rules based. Before each class topic I read Acing Civil Procedure (Acing Law School) and then outlined the rule in my own words using the Commentary sections in A Student's Guide to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (Student Guides) to fill in and flesh out the rules. I then read through Emanuel Law Outline: Civil Procedure Yeazell (Emanual Law Outlines) skimming and highlighting the key points in this casebook and adding the extra info to my rule outlines. This made class easy because I simply noted the key comments and wording my Prof used and modified my outline accordingly. After class I quickly organized the rule outline and moved on. This may seem like a lot of time, but it was about 3 hours a week. Beware of spending too much time on the supplements and rule outline BEFORE class. Much of the material in the supplements and casebook is not covered in class and therefore a waste of time.

When many spent extra time making their outlines, mine was complete and I spent an hour or two each week working through hypos and questions from Civil Procedure: Examples & Explanations 5th edition and Glannon Guide to Civil Procedure: Student Manual. I added any issues and fact patterns I came across, to my rules outline. Before the exam I condensed my outlined rules, worked on hypos, and used the hypos we went over in class to see how Prof would work them into the exam. Overall I did not spend much time understanding the cases in their entirety . After the first week of class you should have typed down every question asked in class, because this is what the prof will ask the rest of the year. This makes it easier to skim cases and determine what is necessary and what is a complete waste of memory and time.

For first semester, this was my worst class. My 1st semester Prof was not very good and I did not practice hypos and writing out answers as in 2nd semester. What I learned was to USE SUPPLEMENTS. I used them in half my classes (best grades) and not in the other half (good but worse). I managed to use Emanuel to catch up and made a great outline, but I spent far too much time with my wording in the essays. This is where Understanding Civil Procedure, E&E and Glannon Guide (multiple choice) came in. Even without multiple choice exams, these short practice questions really help hammer out the trickier parts. The hypos help you learn to quickly write out your answer. The Understanding series is GREAT for your first semester, because it more in depth and helps you understand the overall concepts better. Also, many prefer E&E to other books for explanation, but I found it better suited for hypos.

These books collectively were not necessary , but they sure helped. If you are short on cash, the best books from most helpful to least are your required casebook, FRCP Student's guide, Emanuel (if not using Yeazall, the keyed edition to your casebook if possible, if not then case briefs should work), Acing Civ Pro (AMAZING short book with great checklists to work through the rules), Glannon Guide, and then E&E (if used for hypos, although there is a newer ed). For first semester, the Understanding book was excellent to read before anything else (do not read too heavy), because it is highly explanatory. I have found canned briefs useful from online and the various case brief books keyed to your casebook. Acing Civ Pro was the best book, but not the most needed if short on cash. See my other reviews regarding the above books mentioned. However only the first couple paragraphs will be different.

Good Luck, I will try and answer any comments!
*Nameless*
The book came with a "CasebookConnect" sticker on the title page of the book. On this sticker was a code to register to a study center online. The code had already been redeemed, even though I bought the book new. Furthermore - and this is the main cause of my complaint - is that the sticker is impossible to remove without permanently damaging the book. For the price of the book, I expect far better.