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by John Maxcy Zane
Download The story of law fb2
Legal History
  • Author:
    John Maxcy Zane
  • ISBN:
    1561692298
  • ISBN13:
    978-1561692293
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Gaunt (1996)
  • Pages:
    486 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Legal History
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1669 kb
  • ePUB format
    1153 kb
  • DJVU format
    1770 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    848
  • Formats:
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The story of law, by John Maxcy Zane; new foreword, annotations, and bibliographies by Charles J. Reid, jr,-2nd c. The book evidences both Zane's enthusiasm for history and his technical mastery of the law of banking

The story of law, by John Maxcy Zane; new foreword, annotations, and bibliographies by Charles J. Reid, jr,-2nd cd. 6. . The book evidences both Zane's enthusiasm for history and his technical mastery of the law of banking. In his prefatory note, he expressed the wish that his book "be of usc not only to lawyers, hut also to bankers. 14Thc introduction reveals Zane at his must magisterial, deftly tracing the origin of Anglo-American banking law to English theories of bailment, trusteeship, and agency, and proposing to criticize courts that failed to understand the historical roots uf the concepts they all too clumsily deployed.

Author of The story of law, The law of banks and banking, The Origins Of English Law, The Aryan, Babylonian and Jewish Law, The Roman Creation Of Modern Law, Law .

Author of The story of law, The law of banks and banking, The Origins Of English Law, The Aryan, Babylonian and Jewish Law, The Roman Creation Of Modern Law, Law Among Primordial Men, Law Among The Greeks, Lincoln. The law of banks and banking. The Roman Creation Of Modern Law.

Download Free PDF John Maxcy Zane General Convert to Kobo. Bookyards Youtube channel is now active. Bookyards at Twitter.

John Maxcy Zane (March 26, 1863 - December 6, 1937) was an American lawyer. Zane was born in Springfield, Illinois. He was admitted to the bar in 1888 and spent eleven years practicing law in the state of Utah. Zane would spend the remainder of his career in Chicago, teaching briefly at the Northwestern University School of Law and the University of Chicago. Zane specialized in patent, trademark, and commercial law.

This text gives a complete outline history of the law, showing how an increasing awareness of the individual as a person who is responsible for decision and action gradually transformed the legal process.

The Story Of Law book. John M. Zane lucidly describes the growth and improvement of the law over thousands of years, and he points out that an increasing awareness of the individual as a person who is responsible for decision and action gradually transformed the law. The seventeen chapters include "The Physical Basis of Law," "Law Among Primordial Men," "Babylonian Law," "The Jewish Law," "Law Among the Greeks," "The Roman Creation of Modern Law," "Medieval Law in Europe," "The Origins of English Law," and "International La.

Intended for both lawyers and lay readers, the book covers such subjects as "The Physical Basis of Law," "Law . John Maxcy Zane was a Chicago attorney and the author of The Story of Law (1927)

John Maxcy Zane was a Chicago attorney and the author of The Story of Law (1927).

Law, for Zane, is a human creation, deeply based on custom and biology, not on divine will or the theories of judges. Zane's book is a solid introduction to the history of the Western legal system, and provides a good foundation for further study by the non-professional. His very informative discussion of the origins of the concept of "natural law" illustrates this belief. He has little good to say about the laws of the ancient Greeks, attributes most of what we now call law, including the English Common Law, to the Romans.

The story of law, by John Maxcy Zane ; new foreword, annotations, and. bibliographies by Charles J. Reid . Reid, J. 2nd ed. p. c.


Gerceytone
Originally checked this book out from the public library. I enjoyed it so much I ordered my own copy.
Malarad
This is one of the series of high quality, low cost reprints of legal and historical classics published by The Liberty Press. It was originally published in 1927, and first reprinted by Liberty in 1992. Zane was a successful commercial attorney who also had a strong interest in the history of the law. This book was an ambitious undertaking, an outline of the development of the Western legal tradition from prehistoric to modern times. It is no doubt regarded as being hopelessly out of date by modern legal scholars, but I haven't seen anything better or more recent for the general reader.

Zane's style is for the most part simple and straightforward, understandable by the reader of average education and literacy. At the time he wrote this book, in the mid-1920's, prosperity had come for the first time to millions of Americans, and television had not yet been invented. Reading was a major middle-class activity, the Book of the Month Club and Readers Digest were becoming household names, and Zane's book was aimed at that newly educated audience.

Zane has a couple of hobby-horses, one being that commercial law is the foundation of civilization, and he tends to ride it a bit excessively. He may be correct in his opinion, given that commerce is the foundation of the prosperity and dominance of our modern "Western" civilization, but his own professional bias is also clearly at work. He was also fascinated by the development of the English court system and legal profession. His description of those institutions in the Late Middle Ages is a bit tedious, with more detail than the average general reader is likely to find interesting. He is very opinionated, which I find entertaining, but this may not be to everyone's taste.

He believed that law evolved organically out of the fact that human beings were creatures who lived in groups and therefore needed to regulate their behavior towards each other in order to survive and reproduce. Law, for Zane, is a human creation, deeply based on custom and biology, not on divine will or the theories of judges. His very informative discussion of the origins of the concept of "natural law" illustrates this belief.

He has little good to say about the laws of the ancient Greeks, attributes most of what we now call law, including the English Common Law, to the Romans. He also has little regard for the Anglo-Saxons, or Justice Coke, or the jury system. His chapter on the development of the American legal system is titled "The Absolute Reign of Law", which states his view of the case very clearly. He spends much time in this chapter discussing the impeachment of Justice Samuel Chase in 1804, which he believes permanently set the shape of the American political system. (It should be noted that Justice Rehnquist wrote a history of the Chase impeachment in 1992.)

His chapter on international law includes a long discussion of the Alabama Claims tribunal. He had a jaundiced view of the American attitude toward that tribunal, and would no doubt be unsurprised by the attitude of the current American government toward international law.

Zane's book is a solid introduction to the history of the Western legal system, and provides a good foundation for further study by the non-professional. Highly recommended.
tref
Reading this book is an cheerful thing.it is fit for all kinds of people.