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by Arthur L. Stinchcombe
Download When Formality Works: Authority and Abstraction in Law and Organizations fb2
Legal Education
  • Author:
    Arthur L. Stinchcombe
  • ISBN:
    0226774961
  • ISBN13:
    978-0226774961
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Chicago Press; New edition edition (September 15, 2001)
  • Pages:
    218 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Legal Education
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    4.9
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Stinchcombe argues the opposite Arthur L. Stinchcombe is a professor emeritus of sociology at Northwestern University.

Stinchcombe argues the opposite. When a plan is designed to correct itself and keep up with the reality it is meant to govern, it can be remarkably successful. He points out a wide range of examples where this is the case, including architectural blueprints, immigration law, the construction of common law by appeals courts, Fannie Mae's secondary mortgage market, and scientific paradigms and programs. Arthur L. He is the author of the award-winning booksConstructing Social Theories and Information and Organization.

Request PDF On Mar 1, 2004, Frank Dobbin and others published When Formality Works: Authority and Abstraction . International Organisations and the Law of Treaties. By Catherine Brölmann. Oxford, Portland OR: Hart Publishing, 2007.

International Organisations and the Law of Treaties.

Functionalism is alive and well in When Formality Works.

When Formality Works: Authority and Abstraction in Law and Organizations by Arthur L. Stinchcombe. American Journal of Sociology 109, no. 5: 1244–1246. Functionalism is alive and well in When Formality Works. Stinchcombe’s avowed goal is to sketch the factors that make formalization-rules, blue-prints, and citation practices-effective. Rules have a bad rap among sociologists, who see legal systems, bureaucracies, and corporate hand-books as evil means of denying power to the downtrodden. Stinchcombe identifies three characteristics

Functionalism is alive and well in When Formality Works. Stinchcombe identifies three characteristics. First, formalization must be based on abstractions that are useful representations of the problems and solutions in question-that achieve cognitive adequacy. If abstractions do not map well to real situations, they will not be useful guides to action. Second, formalization must be communicable. It helps if rules are transparent, and if they are written in the lingua franca of those subject to them (lawyerese for lawyers, physicsese for physicists).

When formality works. authority and abstraction in law and organizations. by Arthur L. Abstraction, Formalities (Law), Legal authorities, Sociological jurisprudence. Published 2001 by University of Chicago Press in Chicago. Includes bibliographical references (p. 195-201) and index.

Stinchcombe, Arthur L. 2001. When formality works: Authority and abstraction in law and organizations. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Max Weber and the idea of economic sociology. Princeton: Princeton University Press. The case for an economic sociology of law.

An ambitious new work by a well-respected sociologist, Information and Organizations provides a bold perspective . Constructing Social Theories.

An ambitious new work by a well-respected sociologist, Information and Organizations provides a bold perspective of the dynamics of organizations.

Arthur L. Stinchcombe, When Formality Works. Authority and Abstraction in Law and Organizations (Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 2001). Governing a Technological Society (London, The Athlone Press, 2001). 18. A recurrent theme in the work of Laurent Thevenot: Laurent Thevenot, Jugement ordinaire et jugement de droit, Annales ESC, 6, 1992, pp. 1279-99; L’autorite a l’epreuve de la critique.

Jean Piaget, 1896-1980 Jean Piaget, a Swiss psychologist, whose original training was in the natural sciences, spent much of his career studying the psychological development of children, largely at the Institut . Rousseau at the University of Geneva, but also at home, with his own children as subjects.

In this innovative exploration of the concept of formality, or governing by abstraction, Arthur Stinchcombe breathes new life into an idea that scholars have all but ignored in recent years. We have come to assume that governing our social activities by advance planning—by creating abstract descriptions of what ought to happen and adjusting these descriptions as situations change—is not as efficient and responsive as dealing directly with the real substance of the situation at hand. Stinchcombe argues the opposite. When a plan is designed to correct itself and keep up with the reality it is meant to govern, it can be remarkably successful. He points out a wide range of examples where this is the case, including architectural blueprints, immigration law, the construction of common law by appeals courts, Fannie Mae's secondary mortgage market, and scientific paradigms and programs.Arguing that formality has been misconceived as consisting mainly of its defects, Stinchcombe shows how formality, at its best, can serve us much better than ritual obedience to poorly laid plans or a romantic appeal to "real life."