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by Mark Helprin
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Intellectual Property
  • Author:
    Mark Helprin
  • ISBN:
    0061733121
  • ISBN13:
    978-0061733123
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Broadside Books; Reprint edition (November 23, 2010)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Intellectual Property
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1245 kb
  • ePUB format
    1605 kb
  • DJVU format
    1996 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    463
  • Formats:
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For those familiar with Helprin's fiction, this book will provide a fascinating insight to understanding the passions of those stories

For those familiar with Helprin's fiction, this book will provide a fascinating insight to understanding the passions of those stories. Foremost there, though, and quite clear here is the passion for truth and justice, and the belief that these will prevail if we stay true to our core beliefs. We may not finish an important issue we are working on or with, but our integrity in starting it with a good foundation and staying with our purpose will give our lives significance.

The resulting book, Digital Barbarism: A Writer’s Manifesto, is a vindication of the aphorism about the . Helprin can be a wonderful wordsmith, and there are many admirable passages and strong arguments in this book.

But the thread that binds the work together is hectoring, pompous and enormously tedious.

Digital Barbarism: A Writer& Manifesto Helprin Mark HarperCollins USA 9780061733123 : Mark Helprin .

Digital Barbarism: A Writer& Manifesto Helprin Mark HarperCollins USA 9780061733123 : Mark Helprin anticipated that his 2007 New York Times op-ed piece about the extension of the term o. shocked by his young critics breathtaking sense of entitlement and appalled by the breadth, speed, and illogic of their arguments, Helprin realized how drastically different this generation.

Start by marking Digital Barbarism: A Writer's Manifesto as Want to Read . This is that book that you love to hate! Mark Helprin is such a nasty, mean windbag in his book Digital Barbarism.

Start by marking Digital Barbarism: A Writer's Manifesto as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In Digital Barbarism, bestselling novelist Mark Helprin (Winter’s Tale, A Soldier of the Great War) offers a ringing Jeffersonian defense of private property in the age of digital culture, with its degradation of thought and languag A strange, wondrous, challenging, enriching boo. .

In April 2009, HarperCollins published Helprin's "writer's manifesto", Digital Barbarism

In April 2009, HarperCollins published Helprin's "writer's manifesto", Digital Barbarism. Lessig called Helprin's writing "insanely sloppy" and also criticized HarperCollins for publishing a book "riddled with the most basic errors.

Digital Barbarism: A Writer's Manifesto. Although I had not previously read any of Mr. Helprin’s novels, I was vaguely aware of his credentials in the conservative movement including his speech writing for Bob Dole’s presidential campaign. Digital Barbarism - Mark Helprin. A timely, cogent, and important attack on the popular Creative Commons movement, Digital Barbarism provides rational, witty, and supremely wise support for the individual voice and its hard-won legal protections.

A timely, cogent, and important attack on the popular Creative Commons movement, Digital Barbarism provides rational, witty, and supremely wise support for the individual voice and its hard-won legal protections.

“A strange, wondrous, challenging, enriching book….Beautiful and powerful…you will not encounter another book like it.”

—National Review online

 

In Digital Barbarism, bestselling novelist Mark Helprin (Winter’s Tale, A Soldier of the Great War) offers a ringing Jeffersonian defense of private property in the age of digital culture, with its degradation of thought and language and collectivist bias against the rights of individual creators. A timely, cogent, and important attack on the popular Creative Commons movement, Digital Barbarism provides rational, witty, and supremely wise support for the individual voice and its hard-won legal protections.


Sardleem
I'm 40 percent done reading the new book by Mark Helprin, "Digital Barbarism" (Kindle Edition). "Reading" is probably not the right word for it, as the activity here is the mental equivalent of forcing my way through a very thick and prickly underbrush in a swampy forest. It is mostly due to his writing style: dense, convoluted, opaque. I find myself having to frequently re-read his meandering sentences to get at the point he is trying to make. It is quite ironic that at the origin of this book lies a New York Times editorial by Mr. Helprin, in which he proposed extending the term of copyright considerably, and for which he was viciously attacked in comments and blogs. He complains of having been grossly misunderstood, and never having advocated extending the period of copyright protection to infinity, as implied by his attackers. Yet what he wrote in the original article was this: "Congress is free to extend at will the term of copyright. It last did so in 1998, and should do so again, as far as it can throw." When read extremely carefully (probably more than once), there is nothing in these sentences that explicitly says "forever", and really nobody, not even US Congress, can throw anything into infinity. But can you blame scores of people for reading into these sentences a desire for infinite extension? Yes, it may be a leap of logic, but a tiny one. And that's the problem with Mr. Helprin: his writing lacks precision, is embellished by his wordsmithing to a point of ambiguity. Some people will claim that he writes beautifully; I'd say, yes, inasmuch as rococo architecture can be considered beautiful.

Aside from my frustration with its language, there is also the fact that this book is a long, tiresome tirade against the modern world. Mr. Helprin gives a tip of his hat to a few good things modern technology has brought, like improvements in medicine, but this is barely noticeable in the thicket of his million complaints, including things as trivial (OK, silly) as the substitution of pen and paper with the computer as the writer's primary tool. (I am fully cognizant of the irony of my reading his book on Kindle, the latest incarnation of the "machine" he seems to despise...).

All in all, this book has been a huge disappointment so far, all the more that I basically agree with many of his points, and share his fear that the support beams of our culture are being turned into dust by swarms of aggresive, insatiable termites, whose damaging power is amplified by technology. There are several species of these termites, with different names, including: the Open Source "movement", music "sharing" networks, Creative Commons, etc, but with the same endgame in mind: replacing our property-based society with one based on the old, utopian ideal of "contribute what you can, take what you need". (Given our imperfect nature, this ideal very quickly degenerates into, "contribute as little as possible, grab as much as you can get away with", resulting in economical and societal deterioration. XX century has given us plenty of examples of that pathway, but some people still think they can do it better "next time".)

We're very much in need of powerful, precise critics of all that is wrong with the new, "digital" culture, and by golly, there is plenty: from the above mentioned termites, to the sense of entitlement with no bounds ("I want, therefore I am. I am, therefore I shall have"); to the worship of mob rule hidden behind oxymorons like "wisdom of the crowds" or "smart mobs"; to the maniacal tearing down of livelihoods and entire industries, of which newspapers are the latest victim. This criticism, however, cannot be just a temper tantrum, but has to be able to see this unfolding transformation from more than one angle; after all, neither the music industry, nor the newspaper business are entirely blameless in bringing their own demise. Unfortunately, Mr. Helprin is not that kind of critic, and that's OK, as long as his failure on this front does not discourage others.
Modimeena
Book Review of Digital Barbarism: a writer’s manifesto
by: Mark Helprin
Harper Collins Publishers, New York, 2009, 232 Pages
by: Samuel A. Nigro, M.D.

Mark Helprin is worried about the impact of low standards of discourse, especially the loss of “copyright” on our culture due to the demonic stealing of minds by the increasing misuse of computer based electronocelluloidprint technology.
It [psychotheft or digital barbarism] produces mouth-breathing morons in backwards baseball caps and pants that fall down; Slurpee-sucking geeks who seldom see daylight; pretentious and earnest hipsters who want you to wear bamboo socks so the world won’t end; women who have lizard tattoos winding from the naval to the nape of the neck; beer-drinking dufuses who pay to watch noisy cars driving around in a circle for 8 hours at a stretch; and an entire race of females, now entering middle age that speak in North American chipmunk and seldom makes a statement without, like, a question mark at the end? (Pg. 57).

Such is the entertaining erudition in this book, as the author makes the case for support of copyright laws of all things! I cannot believe I read a book about such a boring and esoteric topic and was so royally entertained.
To make his case that copyrights should be maintained and extended for the benefit of authors, readers, and the culture itself, Helprin inserts many vignettes each worthy of long lasting preservation. For example, his prized professor at Harvard, who selected him for individual tutoring from hundreds of applicants, stopped the one-on-one dogmatic teaching when Helprin interrupted the professor in mid-sentence saying, “Look, I don’t claim to be intelligent, it is not my strength.” Astonished, the professor asked “What is your strength?” And Helprin said, “I am loyal to what I love, at any cost, and sometimes I can put together a decent sentence.” The Honors tutorial thus became conversational, no longer didactic. Shortly thereafter, the professor told of an army experience during WWII where he was isolated to the extent that he made “friends with a pig”, and commented “pigs are very intelligent” then, perhaps remembering Helprin’s denial, “turned scarlet” (pages 89-90). The book is not sparse in these delightful copyright deserving personal incidents which not only elevate consciousness of human nature but, each, in its own way, proves that such writings MUST be copyrighted for at least 100 years because they belong to a deserving author.
Just so, all writing labors should remain protected and not denigrated by dissolution in feigned-collaboration or altered by the digital claims of others. To allow such today because it is possible by computer machines is “digital barbarism” without a doubt. The author is thoroughly convincing that no one has the right to plagiarize, rewrite, distort or claim as their own any phrase of this or any writing ever, because the true author deserves credit for his work forever. All arguments for the power to do otherwise are detailed, seen to be metastasizing deflections from the natural flow of the universe, and rebutted with cogent force. Indeed, copyright Laws are necessary to prevent the Lord of the Rings (illicit power) from ruling and ruining the world.
Truly, a civil culture of truth, oneness, good and beauty requires the protection of individual literary accomplishments and especially scientific publications, otherwise the computer shrinkage of communication, the immediate profusion of impulsivity, the potential for global intrusion, and the massive scale for the illicit power to steal, will collectively destroy the honor and integrity of the individual (both writer and reader) in civilization—and non-being will reign. Get this book, read it, savor it, it is a unique experience. And protect copyright laws.