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by Horowitz
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Puzzles & Games
  • Author:
    Horowitz
  • ISBN:
    0020288905
  • ISBN13:
    978-0020288909
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Touchstone (March 1, 1972)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Puzzles & Games
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1814 kb
  • ePUB format
    1110 kb
  • DJVU format
    1296 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    536
  • Formats:
    txt mobi rtf txt


How to Improve You Chess" is devoted to the player who already knows the rudiments of the game and wants to become more proficient

How to Improve You Chess" is devoted to the player who already knows the rudiments of the game and wants to become more proficient. The book is designed specifically for the average player- to help him tighten his game to the point at which he can take genuine pride and pleasure in it. The authors.

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How to Improve Your Chess:I A. Horowitz, Fred Reinfeld. Improving Your Chess: Fred Reinfeld. Kasparov’s Winning Chess Tactics: Bruce Pandolfini. How to Reassess Your Chess: Jeremy Silman. How to Think Ahead in Chess: I. A. Horowitz & Fred Reinfeld. How to Win in the Chess Openings: I. Horowitz. Let’s Play Chess: Bruce Pandolfini.

Find out more about How to Improve Your Chess (Primary) by Horowitz at Simon & Schuster.

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How to Improve You Chess is devoted to the player who already knows the rudiments of the game and wants to become more proficient. want to improve your chess? read this book. most of the people i brutilize think they can win just because they want to. not so. these are the players i smash to smithereenes. and they do pack it up and run. you want to enjoy brutalizing your opponent? read this book.

How to you improve your strength? I have written something here on how to improve your chess but basically it is always the combination of knowledge, practice and the ability to perform under pressure. If you miss any of the 3, you will not become a Master unless you have extraordinary tactical abilities. 81 views · Answer requested by.

Bibliographic Details. Title: How to Improve Your Chess. Publisher: Harvey House. Book Condition: Good. Welcome to Hawking Books. We ship six days a week and your satisfaction is guaranteed. Visit Seller's Storefront

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"How to Improve You Chess" is devoted to the player who already knows the rudiments of the game and wants to become more proficient. The book is designed specifically for the average player-- to help him tighten his game to the point at which he can take genuine pride and pleasure in it. The authors, great chess authorities, give pointers on what objects to pursue and how to meet specific kinds of attack. Their method is to take several games and play them out, and the reasons for victory or defeat made clear. Special attention is paid to openings, including Sicilian Defense, Queen's Gambit Declined, and Bird's Opening, and to strategy, especially the management of bishops and the playing of pawns for the formation of a strong pawn center.

Orll
While the title may promise a clear path to improvement, this book is slightly different in its actual content. It has 11 games of "Problems of Tactical Play" and 3 games of "Problems of Strategy". First it may be frustrating that it is in descriptive notation (like all of the Horowitz books), it offers very brief games that barely reach the middlegame due to tactical errors early on, it feels slightly verbose and appears too specific to gain general improvement insights (like Game 4 is Petroff Defense where Black's third move Kt x P is a mistake that determines the outcome of the rest of the game). So I was thinking along the line of the "potboiler" criticism that chess books written by both Horowitz and Reinfeld are often accused of. I thought, OK, how many times I would really play the Petroff Defense and make this mistake anyway? But reading through the book I was pleasantly surprised as it has many truly helpful points for improvers. I felt that it was possible to move from simple games "...Like one of those Foreign Legion duels fought in the dark with knives and lanterns..." to more complex ones by paying attention to the weak color complexes, liberating pawn moves that open up diagonals for the Bishops, attacking weak pawns and strong pawn centers, etc. One of the most helpful lessons was Game 7, "Watch for Crisis"; analyzing White's immediate, tactical advantage versus Black's long term, strategic advantage and the way to play the game was a clearly understandable, logical description of a positional assessment. Using pawn moves to deprive Knights of their landing squares, pawn moves to limit the opponent's options are very revealing as well. Horowitz is using different openings, like the Ruy Lopez, the Sicilian, Bird's and Gruenfeld and he points out the needs and character of every one these openings, yet could be applicable to other ones as well. . One of my favorite authors for a long time, Horowitz does not disappoint. This is one of those books that every variation should be played out and the book should be re-read for maximum gain. I still hope that one day all older chess books could be "translated" to algebraic notation, as "Kt/K4-Kt5" is quite an eyeful...
Yllk
I would first like to mention that I am a fan or both Horowitz and Reinfeld. While their books are not very dense, they are extremely readable and focus on the most important concepts without getting lost in a lot of unnecessary detail. I believe that to some extent, what books work best for different people depends upon how they learn. For how I learn, this is a great approach and in addition to learning new things I enjoy the process of learning. This makes it more likely that I will actually finish the book!

As many other reviewers mention, this book is not for the absolute beginner. For example, it doesn't teach how the pieces move and basic rules. It is for a beginner who wants to take their game to the next level by understanding elementary openings, the principles behind various tactis and get a sense for strategic planning.

The authors achieve their pedagogical goal by looking at illustrative games between amateurs for the most part. They discuss alternative lines of play, but not in such detail that it is distracting. You can probably follow most of the chapters without pulling a board out, but I recommend putting the example games in a computer and reviewing the various lines until you digest all the principles completely.

As the book proceeds, it develops various themes in an overall context. I think this helps a lot with recall and integrating the knowledge so that it is useful. For example, the first game introduces the Ruy Lopez opening, pinning, tactical use of pawns, how oversights tend to occur, etc. The next chapter builds on this and looks at a different opening and some traps that can occur. All the examples are carefully chosen and by the time you finish the book you will understand a lot more about position, tactics, planning, etc. In short, you will improve your game significantly!

A lot of chess books teach various aspects of the game, but sometimes they fall short with respect to getting the information across in a way that is practical for direct application. This has NOT been the case for me and I have found this book and others by these authors good. They have withstood the test of time and I have no problems with the old chess notation at all. It is quite logical and straightforward. If you are not familiar with it you will catch on quickly. This book provides integrated learning. In this sense, I think it is a simple, but ingenious approach because it gets you thinking like a better chess player without you hardling noticing the learning process.

If you are a beginner, you may want to read HOW TO BE A WINNER AT CHESS by Reinfeld first. This book contains more basics and a good foundation in the game as a whole. The book I'm reviewing is a perfect follow up. If you are looking for something more modern, but that also requires more dedication then HOW TO REASSES YOUR CHESS is wonderful and well thought out. You can also get the HOW TO REASSESS YOUR CHESS WORKBOOK, which is a useful tool to accompany this book.

Ideally, if you are serious about getting better, but are intimidated by most chess books, I think you will benefit from HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR CHESS. It will also prepare you for the more rigorous HOT TO REASSESS YOUR CHESS, which is a nice intermediate step to some more advanced books. You can get Horowitz's and Reinfeld's books very inexpensively used. You might want to try one of these and see how their style appeals to you. If you are intimidated by the average chess book, you might also like Chris Ward's style of teaching and writing. He has books on the VERY basics of the openings and logic behind them, endgame strategy, etc.

The more straightforward books like Chris Ward's are also useful for younger people who haven't quite developed a passion yet, but still have some desire to know more and improve their games incrementally. I know there are other more popular and perhaps better written books out their for various audiences, but for some specific readers I think these might be an even better fit. I was a Director of Education for a major company and taught at both the university and high school levels. Based on my experience, different people have different learning styles and each person needs to find what works best for THEM. Often a mixture of styles is the best approach and actually what I use to digest large amounts of information quickly.
GYBYXOH
GOOD ALL AROUND BOOK FOR THE INTERMEDIATE PLAYER.
Shistus
First, this is not a book for a complete novice. It does not teach the rules. It is for a beginner looing to improve.
This was once a fair book amongst those available (certainly better than most of Reinfeld's rushed pot-boilers). But not anymore. It's very wordy, maybe too wordy. On the plus side, refutations of bad moves are often mentioned. But that doesn't make up for the plain-jane presentation.
For a similar book, try any of the following:
Purdy: Guide to Good Chess
Seirawan: Play Winning Chess
Capablanca: Chess Fundamentals
Idiot's Guide to Chess
Chess for Dummies
If you like Horowitz (and note that most of his old books are in Descriptive Notation) then look for this used. But if you like that sort of book, then Euwe's Chess Master v. Chess Amateur is a much better choice.
Beanisend
want to improve your chess? read this book. most of the people i brutilize think they can win just because they want to. not so. these are the players i smash to smithereenes. and they do pack it up and run. you want to enjoy brutalizing your opponent? read this book.
Brightcaster
I've read and enjoyed this book several times and keep getting new insights each time. It took me from making almost random moves that seem good at the time to playing with purpose and patience. I have started winning more often and when I lose, I can understand and analyze the reasons why. The sample game explanations are clear and entertaining.