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by Thomas Bass
Download Eudaemonic Pie fb2
Puzzles & Games
  • Author:
    Thomas Bass
  • ISBN:
    0394743105
  • ISBN13:
    978-0394743103
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Vintage; 1st edition (February 12, 1986)
  • Pages:
    324 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Puzzles & Games
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1935 kb
  • ePUB format
    1477 kb
  • DJVU format
    1833 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    591
  • Formats:
    lit lrf rtf lrf


Thomas Bass was a member of the group whose adventures are chronicled in The Eudaemonic Pi. Bass clearly put a lot of care and effort into the presentation.

Thomas Bass was a member of the group whose adventures are chronicled in The Eudaemonic Pie. He writes for The New Yorker, Wired, and other magazines. He lives in New York and Paris. Upon reread, I still find it to be an inspired work of art and very well-written book. The only minor thing I've noticed (in the paperback version, anyway) to really complain about are a few typos here and there that jump right out (.

The Eudaemonic Pie is a non-fiction book about gambling by American author Thomas A. Bass. The book was initially published in April 1985 by Houghton Mifflin. The book focuses on a group of University of California, Santa Cruz, physics graduate students (known as the Eudaemons) who in the late 1970s and early 1980s designed and employed miniaturized computers, hidden in specially modified platform soled shoes, to help predict the outcome of casino roulette games

Thomas Bass overwhelmingly fulfills his intention to convey the incredible richness Africa offers the inquiring mind.

Thomas Bass overwhelmingly fulfills his intention to convey the incredible richness Africa offers the inquiring mind. After six difficult years, during which the effort of nearly two dozen people had been sucked into the project, an approach was developed that relied on teams made up of two people, a data gatherer and a bettor.

As with The Predictors, Bass is more interested in the process than the results, which can leave one feeling a little unsatisfied when things aren't wrapped up neatly at the end. Recommended nonetheless.

For other people named Thomas Bass, see Thomas Bass (disambiguation) In his preface.

For other people named Thomas Bass, see Thomas Bass (disambiguation). Thomas Alden Bass (born March 9, 1951) is an American writer and professor in literature and history. This book focuses on African viewpoints to the African situation.

The Eudaemonic Pie is the bizarre true story of how a band of physicists and computer . Books related to The Eudaemonic Pie. Skip this list. Are You Smart Enough to Work at Google?

The Eudaemonic Pie is the bizarre true story of how a band of physicists and computer wizards took on Las Vegas. Remove from Wishlist. Are You Smart Enough to Work at Google? William Poundstone. 100 Essential Things You Didn't Know You Didn't Know: Math Explains Your World.

The Eudaemonic Pie is the bizarre true story of how a band of physicists and computer wizards took on Las Vegas. It chronicles the origins of personal computers, the history of gambling, and the comedy of living a good life governed according to reason (eudaemonia).

A high-tech adventure about breaking the bank in Las Vegas with toe-operated computers.

A funny and outrageous tale of gambling and high tech.

Recounts the true story of a group of young computer wizards who set out to beat the system at Las Vegas by means of mathematical theory and computers, small enough to be hidden in shoes, that communicate with each other by radio and body sensors

TheSuspect
This book is not a technical manual. It does not provide the differential equations which govern roulette, much less provide the algorithms for computer code to solve these simultaneous equations and predict the outcome of a roulette game. Does the author know these things? Maybe, but that would make a much less interesting story.
This is the story of a group of brilliant and odd characters who discover the limitations chaos imposes on logic, reason, and community. Their goal was to create a utopian society funded by profits from gambling. Well, that's life.
Tantil
I first heard about this book during fall semester 1991 from a fellow math grad student at the University of Texas at Austin who had just moved into our way-too-cozy little RL Moore Hall (RLM) office of three. It was my sixth and last semester there. I was on my way out of the Ph.D. program without any new titles attached to my name, or special paper to flash at prospective employers. With money short, that last semester I slept nights in the office on a surprisingly comfortable bench intended solely for day visits from students and colleagues.*

It was with this backdrop of living in Hotel RLM and experiencing a renewed kinship with the Beatles lyric "Oh, that magic feeling, nowhere to go, nowhere to go," that I checked the book out of the university library and spent the next few gorgeous November afternoons lost in its pages on the South Mall, with a view of the Texas State Capitol building a mile to the south. Aged 32, I had still never been to a casino in my life (on a solo cross-country motorcycle trip six years earlier I'd stopped for gas, and gas only, on my way through Las Vegas).

This 1991 read still ranks among my most enjoyable of all time. I disagree with the author-ragging that's gone on in many of the comments here. Bass clearly put a lot of care and effort into the presentation. Upon reread, I still find it to be an inspired work of art and very well-written book.

The only minor thing I've noticed (in the paperback version, anyway) to really complain about are a few typos here and there that jump right out (e.g., "perennnially"). It seems a bit ironic given the subject material, that digital spell checkers evidently weren't used to copyedit the author's work.

A friend of mine has a son who is currently a high school senior with stellar grades at one of the best-ranked schools in California. He has his sights set on a career in engineering. With his top choice being Stanford, I believe the paperback (despite its typos) will make the perfect graduation gift.

*As of 1991 anyway, the beauty of RLM lay not in its physical appearance (this enormous building is actually quite ugly), but in the fact that it housed not one, but at least two separate shower stalls hidden away in restrooms in remote areas where few would ever discover them. I still owe my colleague Fred a debt of gratitude for revealing their existence to me upon hearing where I was sleeping that semester.
Qwne
The criticisms of other reviewers notwithstanding, I liked the book. I read it when originally published and was more irritated by the minor factual errors (for example, in one place the author refers to the "Intel 6502" as the microprocessor powering the KIM-1 -- any self-respecting computer geek will know MOS, not Intel, made the original 65XX line of microprocessors) than by the style. On a recent re-reading I found those errors less annoying and enjoyed the story of a not atypical bunch of nerds from that time period who got more intrigued by the technology and science than ultimately achieving their business goal. But they had a fun trip -- that's what makes this a great read for fans of computing history. Particularly if you were one of those science/computing nerds of the 60s, 70s, or 80s you'll likely enjoy this book -- for those people at least this book is worth a quick read.
Bralore
One of the best cyber stories ever. It reads with the gravity of good fiction, but is al the more satisfying for being true.
energy breath
A group of smart people live a commune-like existence in a house where they use a chore wheel to get things done. They have concluded that money is the key to freedom. If they can get enough money they will be able to aspire towards more helpful pursuits to humanity.

A long lumbering history of the main character is given of his South West upbringing. Numerous pages are devoted to tech talk as those involved spend years as they aspire to create tiny computers, first they attach computers to their bodies as they have come up with a program to predict the outcome of where a roulette ball will fall. So devoted are they that one woman suffers burns to her skin by the equipment that they use.

From there they aspire to create tiny computers that fit in shoes. Their Halloween parties are recounted. Some insight here but at a substantial cost of time. See Bringing Down the House: The Inside Story of Six M.I.T. Students Who Took Vegas for Millions instead. Pass on this. They did have brief contact with a young Steve Jobs.