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by David Sklansky
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Puzzles & Games
  • Author:
    David Sklansky
  • ISBN:
    1880685280
  • ISBN13:
    978-1880685280
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Two Plus Two Pub; First Edition edition (April 1, 2002)
  • Pages:
    245 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Puzzles & Games
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1940 kb
  • ePUB format
    1840 kb
  • DJVU format
    1682 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    320
  • Formats:
    lit txt doc azw


David Sklansky is generally considered the number one authority on gambling in the world today. Besides his ten books on the subject, David also has produced two videos and numerous writings for various gaming publications.

David Sklansky is generally considered the number one authority on gambling in the world today. His occasional poker seminars always receive an enthusiastic reception, including those given at the Taj Mahal in Atlantic City and the World Series of Poker in Las Vegas. More recently, David has been doing consulting work for casinos, Internet gaming sites, and gaming device companies.

A summar of David Sklansky's book Tournament Poker for Advanced Players. Includes details on how to purchase this book or receive it free. This newly-expanded version of Tournament Poker for Advanced Players contains over 100 new pages of updated material dedicated almost entirely to today’s most popular form of tournament poker: no-limit hold ’em. Tournament poker is different from standard ring game poker. While they might appear the same from a distance, there are many differences in proper strategy that are often unknown to many experienced cash game players. Some people excel at tournament poker.

Start by marking Tournament Poker for Advanced Players as Want to Read . This book is a must for anyone playing in tournaments.

Start by marking Tournament Poker for Advanced Players as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Sklansky attended the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania for a year before leaving to become a professional gambler. He briefly took on a job as an actuary before embarking into poker. While on the job he discovered a faster way to do some of the calculations and took that discovery to his boss.

This book explains tournament strategies that only a small number of players have mastered. It assumes you already know how to play poker well, but aren't knowledgeable of tournament-specific concepts and when and where to use them. Some of the ideas discussed include: the effect of going broke, the Gap Concept, how chips change value, adjusting strategy to rising stakes, all-in strategy, final table play, making deals, the "System," focusing on weaker opponents, unusual plays with aces and kings, moving in against the blind, and much more.

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Some players excel at tournament poker. This book explains tournament strategies that only a small number of players have mastered. This is not luck - these are players who have a very strong understanding of what the proper strategy adjustments are, and when they come into play.

Tournament Poker for Advanced Players by David Sklansky is the definitive text on tournament Other Books. The Theory of Poker By David Sklansky. The Theory of Poker: A Professional Poker Player Teaches You How To Think Like One. 293 Pages·2005·1. 72 MB·493 Downloads·New!. Schaum's Outline of Theory and Problems of Beginning Chemistry The Theory of Poker By David Sklansky. 91 Pages·2007·454 KB·14 Downloads. Hold 'em Poker For Advanced Players by David Sklansky and Mason The Theory of Poker. The War of Art: Break Through the Blocks and Win Your Inner Creative Battles.

Tournament poker is different from standard ring game poker. From a distance, it may look like a typical poker game, but there are many factors that can lead to proper strategy that is very different than what most players, (including good poker players), are familiar with.

Yet some people excel at tournament poker. This is not luck. These are players who have a good understanding of what the proper strategy adjustments are, and when they come into play. It is not a coincidence that the same players make it to the final table far more than their fair share.

This text is the first book ever written that explains tournament strategies which only a small number of players have mastered. It assumes you already know how to play poker well, but arent knowledgeable of tournament concepts and when and where to use them. Some of the ideas discussed include the effect of going broke, The Gap Concept, how chips change value, adjusting strategy because the stakes rise, all-in strategy, the last table, making deals, The "System," and much more.


Iesha
I can credit Sklansky with a huge amount of my cash game success. He has seminal works (theory of poker, NL hold'em theory and practice) which are absolutely poker 101. In his cash game books, I don't think I've ever thought he was just plan wrong. There have been times where I would think "I disagree slightly, but he's the expert." I could give him the tie as the runner. However, this book is hot-and-cold. I have over 500+ tournaments, and a winning record. I feel that I have real pragmatic experience to compare his advice too when it comes to tournaments (can't say the same for my cash game.) With this in mind he still provides massive gems, however at the same time and sometimes within a few paragraphs gives the worst advice I've ever heard. As another reviewer said, "he isn't much of a tournament player and it shows." I agree, he often advises playing scared money. Another reviewer said "he is overly concerned about laddering." I also agree with this. Laddering is part of my strategy but certain conditions need to be present. There is a ton of value in reading this book, as there is good info and some new/interesting insights. However, the bad is so bad, a novice player will quickly go broke trying to follow his advice. I have 10 years of tournament experience so I can easily see where he is wrong, where he is right, and where it is questionable. Someone with less experience will likely take it all, or the wrong parts an implement. For me is a one-read-through, but I don't regret the purchase since I like seeing a cash-game perspective on tournaments. Admittedly, by playing more cash games it improved my tournament play. However, I always made sure to take the lessons from cash and modify them to the tournament construct. That is what you are getting here, a cash-game player's outside perspective. If you are a novice player, read the harrington series to get the basics. And funny enough with harrington, stay away from his cash game books as it has the same problem as this book.
Ygglune
I love just about everything by Sklansky. I think, however, that if you read this book you should also read Snyder's books the Poker Tournament Formula 1 and 2 to understand the importance of tournament structure (speed of blinds), position, and to rethink the value of having a lot of chips. I think Sklansky's theories tend to be based on the assumption that each additional chip you gain has less value whereas Snyder makes a compelling case that in many cases having more chips makes your chips more useful both practically and psychologically. If true, and my experience is that it probably is,that really does affect the optimal way to play a tournament. I would recommend reading both perspectives and applying what works for your personal style, for the types of tournaments you play in.
Gold Crown
4.6 stars

I've been playing poker tournaments for nearly a decade now and thought there was nothing more for me to learn. Boy was I wrong.

Sklansky's poker mind is so far advanced it is scary. He thinks about the game in the way it should be thought of: a never ending game that is repetitive. Luckily for us, he has decided to apply that thinking to tournament poker.

The way the book slowly unfolds is wonderful and there is something to draw from every chapter. He takes into account the logic of each scenario from multiple points of view. As you know, a different decision could be made at every point of each hand, and often times there is a fine line between the choices you could make which leaves you questioning your call in hindsight when it doesn't go as planned. Sklansky knows this. He runs these decisions through brilliant mathematical formulas and tells you which decisions are best for what outcome you're looking for. When it gets to a certain point in a tournament, you can either go for the win, or go for the cash. Sklansky lets you know which decision is best for what outcome you want. That is something I had thought of before, but not to the extent which Sklansky takes it to.

I do have some problems with his NL strategy though. In my humble opinion he elects to shove with AK too much. He does point out why it is the better decision, but I've never liked doing that. Regardless of what I think though, I'm sure Sklansky's methods are wiser. After all, he does have a few million more dollars of winnings than I do.

If you are playing poker on a daily basis and the majority of games you play in are tournaments then you must read this. Not only will it improve your game by providing insights you never realized, but it will keep you thinking about the game away from the felt which is always beneficial for the consistent player.
TheMoonix
I disagree with some of the reviewers. I have been playing in poker tournaments for 6 months and have made one final table, finishing 5th. Before I started reading poker books, I just played by gut instinct, and I think I was better off. This book is heavy on theory. Sklansky talks extensively on determining the Exptected Value of a hand and gives lots of mathematical equations to figure out EV, pot odds, and hand winning percentages. Frankly, I don't do math, so all of that went right over my head. The main concept that this book puts forth is the Gap Concept, which is useful. Basically, that means you need a better hand to call a raise (or reraise) with than you do to initiate a bet or a raise. In other words, if you are going to limp in with a hand, you'd better like it enough to call a raise with it.

I'll give this book a second read, but the math really turned me off. I found Ken Warren's book "Winner's Guide to Texas Hold 'Em" more useful, even though it isn't geared towared tournament play. One thing I did like about this book is the hand scenarios. It's interesting to see how you would play a hand measures up to what a pro says you should do. If you are a beginning poker player, you might want to look elsewhere for tournament advice.
Fenritaur
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