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by Lesser Robert
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Pop Culture
  • Author:
    Lesser Robert
  • ISBN:
    1435118510
  • ISBN13:
    978-1435118515
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Metro Books; First Edition edition (2009)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Pop Culture
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1775 kb
  • ePUB format
    1325 kb
  • DJVU format
    1207 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    238
  • Formats:
    txt mobi doc lit


Pulp Art is the groundbreaking-and ultimate-book on one of America's most important and spectacular forms of illustration art. At last, preserved in this volume are most of the still-existing originals created for the pulp covers, never before seen in all their sharply focused, vibrantly colored.

Pulp Art is the groundbreaking-and ultimate-book on one of America's most important and spectacular forms of illustration art. At last, preserved in this volume are most of the still-existing originals created for the pulp covers, never before seen in all their sharply focused, vibrantly colored brilliance. Robert Lesser, a pioneering collector of this work and an expert on American popular culture, has assembled a gallery of these now-priceless originals.

The first book to feature the original paintings created for American pulp magazine covers, this unique . It captures all the brush strokes of the original pulp art paintings, as best it could

The first book to feature the original paintings created for American pulp magazine covers, this unique reference offers an authoritative text. It captures all the brush strokes of the original pulp art paintings, as best it could. It is a treasure of a bygone era. All the imagination of being an artist assigned to these fantastic stories is display in this volume.

The first book to feature the original paintings created for American pulp. The first book to feature the original paintings created for American pulp magazine covers, this unique reference offers an authoritative text, historical surveys, vintage letters, 125 full-page images, and much more.

The term pulp fiction has always had a certain resonance; but it is the artwork-bold, energized. The paintings are spectacular. That sounds childishly simple. The colors are wonderful. The subject is intelligently covered. But it needs to be two to three times thicker and fuller and, well, you know,,,MORE! It is a great introduction. But, the rest of the book is missing.

Pulp magazines (often referred to as "the pulps") were inexpensive fiction magazines that were published from 1896 to the . Pulp Art: Original Cover Paintings for the Great American Pulp Magazines (Book Sales, 2003).

Pulp magazines (often referred to as "the pulps") were inexpensive fiction magazines that were published from 1896 to the late 1950s. The term pulp derives from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. In contrast, magazines printed on higher-quality paper were called "glossies" or "slicks".

Finally, fans of pulp magazines have another attractive collection of cover images to drool over.

The American pulp magazines of the 1930s, '40s, and '50s had some of the most colorful, exciting, and memorable covers ever to appear in print. Chock-full of action-packed, gorgeous-even shocking-color paintings, this unique volume features more than 100 rare original pieces, most from private collections. ا يقوله الناس - كتابة مراجعة. عاينة المستخدمين - xicanti - LibraryThing. Here, the illustrations alone are worth the price of admission.

The early pulp magazines could boast covers by some distinguished American artists; The Popular Magazine had .

The early pulp magazines could boast covers by some distinguished American artists; The Popular Magazine had covers by . Wyeth, and Edgar Franklin Wittmack contributed cover art to Argosy and Short Stories. Later, many artists specialized in creating covers mainly for the pulps; a number of the most successful cover artists became as popular as the authors featured on the interior pages

The American pulp magazines of the 1930s, '40s, and '50s had some of the most colorful, exciting, and memorable covers ever to appear in print.

The American pulp magazines of the 1930s, '40s, and '50s had some of the most colorful, exciting, and memorable covers ever to appear on magazines. In addition to the actual printed covers, artists' sketches, and other illustrations. Chock-full of action-packed, gorgeous - even shocking - color paintings for such popular pulps as American Stories

Synopsis Thrill to the days when bug-eyed monsters, gun-toting gangsters, imperiled ingénues, and sneering super-villains all clamored for attention from the corner newsstand. Pulp Art resurrects the golden age of the American pulp fiction magazine with reproductions of more than one hundred classic pulp cover paintings in all their graphic glory. In addition to full-color art, this volume includes: A narrative history of pulp art and its impact on twentieth century illustration Eighteen essays on pulp art and illustration by Forrest J. Ackerman, Sam Moskowitz, and other distinguished pulp historians Biographies of Rudolf Belarski, Virgil Finlay, Walter M. Baumhofer, J. Allen St. John, and other groundbreaking pulp artists and illustrators. Biography Robert Lesser is a world-famous expert on the golden age of American pulp art and fiction from the 1930s and '40s. He owns one of the largest private collections of original pulp art and pulp magazines known to exist. His collections have been exhibited at the Brooklyn Museum of Art and the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry. Lesser has been the subject of the two documentaries on pulp art and pulp fiction, and he is the author of two books and numerous articles on the subject.

romrom
A dazzling cover which holds true to more pulpy situations inside. Makes one wish we had a museum devoted to actual, saved pulp art.
Shakataxe
I've long been a fan of pulp art, particularly on paperbacks and magazines. This collection was both interesting and satisfying. The reds seemed a bit too intense, but the quality was otherwise good.
Bedy
Large format with great illustrations. A bargain at this price.
Goldenfang
If you're a fan of dramatic art, ripping fast cars packed to the gunwales with gleaming blue steel and gleamier women, get this book. As a feminist, I hate it. As an artist, I'm an addict.

This is why I have a therapist. Go get your own.

The dedication:

"What do I ask of a painting? I ask it to astonish, disturb, seduce, convince." ~ Lucien Freud.

This is NOT your mother's Freud.
Modigas
Arrived as advertised ahead of expected delivery time.
Flamekiller
GREAT BOOK, in very good condition
Doriel
Was disappointed with the selection of art. Very few memorable art works. Very few science fiction art works. Many of the art works were dull and lacked a visual punch. A huge amount of text and not enough pictures. Overall I was disappointed with the subject matter and art selection.
First off, let me say that there is a lot to like in this collection. Out of 182 pages, there are 56 full page reproductions of original art that came from the pulp magazines. At 12 x 9 1/2 inches, and with quality, heavy paper stock, these reproductions are probably worth the cost of the book alone. There are also 64 other illustrations (give or take) that are smaller reproductions of original art, pulp magazine cover reproductions, or other examples (book jackets mostly) of a particular artist's work. These range from a quarter to (rarely) three-quarters of a page - splitting the difference, they come to an estimated 32 more pages of art. Together, that makes 88 things I really, really liked about this book. Many of these reproductions are just gorgeous.

The 100 or so remaining pages are filled with text; and regardless of one's previous knowledge of or interest in the pulp magazine era, that's entirely too much verbiage in a book dedicated to a visual medium. This is true even if that verbiage was highly informative, entertaining or both. I respect Mr. Lesser for his dedication to this material, but I think this material speaks for itself. Add to that there are essays interspersed throughout the book written by other collectors, or those who knew the artists personally, which repeats much of the same information in the main text, and you get a criminal waste of great paper stock that would have been much better put to use by reproducing more full-page examples. The five chapters could have been condensed into one introductory piece perhaps ten pages long or so, and the remaining essays could have been inserted inside the genre groupings of the paintings. As it is, these minor essays are plopped directly in the middle of the different chapters, causing the reader to either interrupt reading the main text, or skip the essay and flip back and forth later on, in order to read all the material.

It could be that the paucity of this material forced the publishers to limit the full page examples. (Many of the smaller inserts are not reproduced from the original, but from the printed cover.) I could understand that, but I would just as well have seen a section reproducing the originals, along with supplemental material that might only reproduce distinctive pulp covers whose originals are lost. And, while I think the author rightly focuses on the most dramatic examples of this art, I also wouldn't have minded seeing a few reproductions (if they exist) of the romance, sports, or the train story pulps, or of some of the other, less sensational magazines, many of which were still extraordinary.

I suppose I shouldn't complain - what is here is excellent. It is a nice supplement to someone's collection of pulp magazines, or of other coffee table books concerning 20th Century Illustrative Art. The shame of it is that it has so much wasted potential.