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Download Rules of the Game fb2

by John McGrath,Maureen Teitelbaum,Jean Renoir
Download Rules of the Game fb2
Movies
  • Author:
    John McGrath,Maureen Teitelbaum,Jean Renoir
  • ISBN:
    0856470902
  • ISBN13:
    978-0856470905
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Lorrimer (1984)
  • Pages:
    168 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Movies
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1347 kb
  • ePUB format
    1890 kb
  • DJVU format
    1779 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    630
  • Formats:
    lrf azw lrf rtf


Jean Renoir (Author), John McGrath (Translator), Maureen Teitelbaum (Translator) & 0 more. On the back of the Criterion dvd it says the The Rules of the Game is a scathing critique of corrupt French society cloaked in a comedy of manners.

Jean Renoir (Author), John McGrath (Translator), Maureen Teitelbaum (Translator) & 0 more.

Jean Renoir, John McGrath (Translator). Maureen Teitelbaum (Translator). Jean Renoir was the son of the great Impressionist painter Pierre Auguste Renoir, whose other children became artist. ndeed, one of the others was an actor playing Octave in this magnificent film. The Rules of the Game (1939) is considered by many to be Renoir's greatest film. Robert Altman said about La Règle du Jeu: - "I learned the rules of the game from 'The Rules of the Game,'„ and Roger Ebert said that this film was not a million miles off from this plot with his "Gosford Park" - right down to the murder.

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The Rules of the Game is considered to be Renoir’s masterpiece (though some would argue the case for La. .Director Jean Renoir decided to use deep focus to make sure we could catch as much of the action as possible.

The Rules of the Game is considered to be Renoir’s masterpiece (though some would argue the case for La Grande Illusion). It mixes both drama and comedy in service of the director’s satirical story about France’s social classes. The rules of the game in question are the rules for each class: if you stray beyond the rules, you are at all kinds of risk. All the characters are related and bound by these rules. Deep focus is a cinematic technique that uses wide angles lenses and small lens apertures to achieve sharp focus within the image in the foreground and the background.

Director: Jean Renoir. Starring: Marquis Robert de La Chesnaye, Christine de La Chesnaye, André Jurieux and others

Director: Jean Renoir. Starring: Marquis Robert de La Chesnaye, Christine de La Chesnaye, André Jurieux and others. Considered one of the greatest films ever made, The Rules of the Game (La règle du jeu), by Jean Renoir, is a scathing critique of corrupt French society cloaked in a comedy of manners in which a weekend at a marquis’ country château lays bare some ugly truths about a group of haut bourgeois acquaintances.

Saying something new and interesting about La Regle du ju (The Rules of the Game) by Jean Renoir (1894–1979) is more than a challenge. Perhaps no film (with the possible exception of Citizen Kane) has been so universally acclaimed by critics of all stripes and persuasions. It is generally well known that the film was almost lost as a result of the outrage it caused when it was released in France on the brink of World War II. Only painstaking restoration efforts since the war enable us to see it today. The film came at the end of Renoir’s (and perhaps any director’s) most spectacular decade.

Home John M. Redoix The Rules of the Game. Claire politely smiled at the old butler as he sat the porcelain cup of tea down on the small table before her. "That will be all, thank yo. I felt rather uncomfortable that she didn't remember to offer me any, but I wasn't exactly surprised. The old butler merely bowed and exited the parlor doors. I had come to Claire's lather large and lavish home for a little private celebration - just the two of us. Well, three - if we counted her husband

John Peter McGrath (1 June 1935 – 22 January 2002) was a British playwright and theatre theorist who took up the cause of Scottish independence in his plays.

John Peter McGrath (1 June 1935 – 22 January 2002) was a British playwright and theatre theorist who took up the cause of Scottish independence in his plays. From an Irish Catholic background, McGrath was born in Birkenhead, and educated in Mold and, after his National Service, at St John's College, Oxford. During the early 1960s he worked for the BBC, and wrote and directed many of the early episodes of the Corporation's police series Z-Cars which began in 1962.

UNREAD, clean, tight, copy. Tight, uncreased spine. Square clean edges and corners in very good wrappers. Very faint 1" ghost sticker inside cover.

Bodwyn
On the back of the Criterion dvd it says the The Rules of the Game is a scathing critique of corrupt French society cloaked in a comedy of manners. I would agree. For the average film viewer picture a classier artier version of the Nichols directed movie Closer (Superbit Edition) with more underlying messages of society and less a character study on love and sex. They are similar because in both movies there is deception and this person is hooking up with this one and so on but there is no real love. Whether they do it out of boredom or pure animal instinct and try to use love as an excuse for their actions. The movie also takes some shots at the media as one character points out how all these important people on television lie why shouldn't the simple people. The movie says a lot and could generate a different perspective to each viewer which makes it great by transcending being pigeonholed into a genre. Simply giving a plot description would be cheating it. All this funny business takes place at a weekend hunting party where the only thing separating the guests from the game they're hunting are the rules.

TONS of Criterion Features (from the back of the dvd)
Disc 1 - New HD transfer with restored image and sound
-Intro to the film by Jean Renoir
-Audio comment written by film scholar Alexander Sesonske and read by filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich
-Version comparison side by side analysis of the two endings of the film, along with an illustrated study of Renoir's shotting script
-Selected scene analysis by Renoir historian Christopher Falkner

Disc II
Excerpts from Renoir, le patron: La regle et l' exception (1966) a french tv program dir. by Jacques Rivette
-Part I of Renoir, a II part 1993 BBC doc by David Thompson, featuring reflections on Renoir from his family, friends, collaborators, and admirers.
-New video essay about the films production, release, and later reconstruction
-Jean Gaborit and Jacques Durand discuss their recon and re release of the film
-New interview with Renoir's son, Alain, an assistant cameraman on the film
New Int with Rules set designer Max Douy
-1995 int w/ actress Mia Parely
-Written tributes to the film and Renoir by J. Hoberman, Kent Jones, Paul Schrader, Wim Wenders and Others

*24 Page booklet featuring writings by Jean Renoir, Francois Truffaut, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Bertrand Tavemier, and an essay by Alexander Sesonske.
Mash
Hmmmm.....what's to say. The movie, The Rules of the Game is considered one of the greatest movies ever made simply because it is one of the greatest movies ever made. The cinematography is innovative for it's time. The acting is excellant. The story is a fascinating sociological probe of French upper middle class culture of the time.

But this edition is especially provocative. It is particularly interesting that the movies that are considered breakthroughs often did the worst at the box office. Renoir was nearly driven out of France for this one. The comparisons with Citizen Kane are fascinating.

Particularly interesting in the considerable extra material provided with this edition is the intimate details of Renoir's life including rarely disclosed information about his father, the painter, Pierre-Auguste Renoir.

The Criterion Collection would be relevant as a study piece in several courses - sociology, art, communication.....
რฉςh
RULES OF THE GAME is the CITIZEN KANE of France. The 2 films were made within 2 years of one another; both used innovative techniques such as deep-focus photography, long takes, and overlapping dialogs; both were rejected by the public upon its first release and re-discovered in the fifties. Fittingly, both films were often ranked side by side in many polls of the greatest films ever made. Most importantly, the two films succeeded where few films did: advancing the art of film, providing spectacular entertainment, and shedding profound insights on the human condition.
(I will reveal plot details below; those who haven't seen RULES please read no further! My brief analysis of the film, of course, does not do justice to it.) Though a comedy on the surface and raucous at times, RULES consistently delves into the dark themes of deceit and death. Throughout the film we see lies being told, infidelity being committed, hypocrisy being carried out. At the film's midpoint, the violent, belligerent nature of man is potently depicted in a barrage of killings that occur in the famous hunting sequence. Near the end, the film teases us briefly when enemies seem to reconcile and past offenses are about to be forgiven. Then, in one of the most memorable endings in film, death and deceit resurface: a man is shot to death as a result of an extramarital love affair, and his death is explained away neatly as an accident in order to hide all the "dirty linen"; it is a moment that makes you laugh out loud at its absurdity and sigh in sadness at the same time. The film concludes with one of the most haunting images: a funereal procession of the shadows of people moving past our view.
To paraphrase the old general in the film, films like RULES are "a rare breed" indeed.
Rias
Great films inhabit a world all their own. It is almost impossible to grade them in any comparative sense with most other movies which are primarily entertainment. "Rules of the Game" is actually rather strange. But its strangeness is what gives it its unique brilliance. Is it a comedy of manners or a tragic indictment of the upper classes? It is all this and more. But most important, "Rules of the Game" is beautiful. Great sensitivity is found in every scene—the positioning of actors and settings, the play of light, and the extraordinary camera work, all at the service of a director with tremendous artistic vision.