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by Chad Harbach
Download The Art of Fielding fb2
Humor
  • Author:
    Chad Harbach
  • ISBN:
    0007418698
  • ISBN13:
    978-0007418695
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    HarperCollins Publishers; edition edition (September 1, 2011)
  • Pages:
    450 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humor
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1807 kb
  • ePUB format
    1941 kb
  • DJVU format
    1113 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    198
  • Formats:
    azw docx txt rtf


The Art of Fielding is a 2011 novel by American author Chad Harbach. It centers on the fortunes of shortstop Henry Skrimshander and his career playing college baseball with the fictional Westish College Harpooners.

The Art of Fielding is a 2011 novel by American author Chad Harbach. The novel was nominated for the Guardian First Book Award, and was featured on several year-end lists. Henry Skrimshander begins the novel as a 17-year-old playing on a Legion baseball team in Lankton, South Dakota

Home Chad Harbach The Art of Fielding. When he opened his eyes the South Dakota shortstop was jogging back onto the field. As the kid crossed the pitcher’s mound he peeled off his uniform jersey and tossed it aside.

Home Chad Harbach The Art of Fielding. The art of fielding, . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48. Begin Reading. He wore a sleeveless white undershirt, had an impossibly concave chest and a fierce farmer’s burn.

Chad Harbach's The Art of Fielding is one of those rare novels-like Michael Chabon's Mysteries of Pittsburgh or John Irving's The World According to Garp-that seems to appear out of nowhere and then dazzles and bewitches.

Chad Harbach's The Art of Fielding is one of those rare novels-like Michael Chabon's Mysteries of Pittsburgh or John Irving's The World According to Garp-that seems to appear out of nowhere and then dazzles and bewitches and inspires until you nearly lose your breath from the enjoyment and satisfaction, as well as the unexpected news-blast that th. Harbach's muscular prose breathes new life into the American past-time, recasts the personal worlds that orbit around it, and leaves you longing, lingering, and a baseball convert long after the last page. ―Téa Obreht, author of The Tiger's Wife. Chad Harbach has hit a game-ender with The Art of Fielding.

Chad Harbach's The Art of Fielding is 2/3rds strong but maybe 100 pages too long

Chad Harbach's The Art of Fielding is 2/3rds strong but maybe 100 pages too long. You know that weird paradox you feel when you like a book but kind of wish it was over? I felt that around, oh, page 350 of The Art of Fielding. So while I can recommend the novel, with reservations, I can't make the four star leap. His bible, a beat up book called The Art of Fielding, is full of philosophy and practical pointers on how to become the best player he can be. But this novel is not a baseball book per se. Yes, baseball is part of the setting as is the campus of a small liberal arts school in Wisconsin called Westish College, but the book is not focused on baseball or college.

Chad Harbach makes the case for baseball, thrillingly, in his slow, precious and altogether excellent first novel, The Art of Fielding

Chad Harbach makes the case for baseball, thrillingly, in his slow, precious and altogether excellent first novel, The Art of Fielding. You loved it, he writes of the game, because you considered it an art: an apparently pointless affair, undertaken by people with a special aptitude, which sidestepped attempts to paraphrase its value yet somehow seemed to communicate something true or even crucial about the Human Condition

The Art of Fielding Текст. During batting practice, Henry scaled the left-field fence and stood in the parking lot to shag the amazing moonshots that Two Thirty Toover kept hitting.

The Art of Fielding Текст. Welcome back, Jim, Coach Cox cheered, as ball after ball soared easily over the wall.

Chad Harbach at the 2011 Texas Book Festival. Chad Harbach is an American writer Harbach worked on his baseball novel, The Art of Fielding, for nine years

Chad Harbach at the 2011 Texas Book Festival. Chad Harbach is an American writer. 1 Background and education. 2 n + 1. 3 The Art of Fielding. Harbach worked on his baseball novel, The Art of Fielding, for nine years. In high school, Harbach had played baseball, along with golf and basketball; in March, 2010, he told Bloomberg News, What fascinates me about baseball is that although it’s a team game, and a team becomes a kind of family, the players on the field are each very much.

Chad Harbach The Art of Fielding. The throw had struck Owen full in the face. He was reading a book, his battery-powered light clipped to the brim of his cap; he never saw it coming

Chad Harbach The Art of Fielding. Chapter 9. Henry wiped his right hand against his thigh, back and forth, back and forth. His index finger must have slipped off the seams. That must have been what happened. He misgripped the seams, and then his finger slipped, and then a gust of wind kicked up and carried the ball much farther off course than could have happened with finger-slippage alone. He was reading a book, his battery-powered light clipped to the brim of his cap; he never saw it coming. His head snapped back and cracked against the concrete wall behind him. Bounced, like a ball made of bone.

A wonderful, warm novel from a major new American voice.

Pemand
I wanted to love this book. I really did. And there were things to like about it.

Ultimately, though, I found the plot unconvincing and the characters unnatural. People just do not behave the way the characters in the book behave. It doesn't happen. I won't spoil it for you, if you are actually interested in reading the book, by detailing the ways in which the characters are skewed. But they are.

Beyond that, some of the plot elements are trite in the extreme, and the foreshadowing is more like that blinking neon light on an airplane directing you to the exit.

Another reviewer says it doesn't stand up to baseball books like The Natural. I'd add Bang the Drum Slowly to that list.
White gold
I'm a baseball guy. 66 years old, and 60 of that I've been a baseball guy. So yes, I know from the descriptions and characters and attitudes and feelings in this book. Its wordy, but a lot of those words are "baseball". I'm old school, so I struggled a bit with words like " fresh person". I found the smoking of weed a bit too pervasive for a small D3 school (in Wisconsin, no less!). But the wordiness yielded thorough character development so I tolerated it (though I did not embrace it).
Overall, a well developed story, only somewhat slightly implausible. Because it's about baseball ( as am I) it gets 4 stars instead of 3.
Coiwield
Baseball has been as much a part of my life as it was a part of Henry's. My doctor, knowing my love of baseball, suggested I read this book. Although I enjoyed the baseball parts of the book, I did not like reading about the relationship between Owen and Affenlight. Also, having known players who've experienced the "block" Henry suffered through with his throwing, I did not necessarily enjoy reading about Henry's misery.
Swordsong
I can't say enough good things about this book. It's as enjoyable to read as anything out there, so full of life and pathos. It's not that it's an overly easy read, but the pages fly by because it's that good. Also, it hits a fair ball with the baseball side of the story. Sorry, couldn't resist. I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys good books of substance. The Art of Fielding is a homerun. Sorry, again.
Felolak
I'm a long-time fan of literary baseball novels. From Bernard Malamud's "The Natural," to Kinsella's "Shoeless Joe" and "Iowa Baseball Confederacy," to Michael Bishop's "Brittle Innings," I've been immersing myself in the genre. I was hoping that Harbach's novel would join the list alongside Darryl Brock's wonderful book, 'If I Ever Get Back." But, this book simply isn't quite good enough. There are long meandering passages where it seems as though the author just wanted to seem worldy and sophisticated, and one of the characters is such an odd character with no backstory whatsover, but is yet so integral to the plot, that he seems like a deux es machina. I read the entire book, but did resort to skimming copious amounts of pages whenever Pella appeared.

Three stars, but I wish it was more.

By the way, "Brittle Innings" is a brilliant book about baseball that has only recently been rereleased. It is well worth your time to check out.
Risinal
The Art of Fielding is not about baseball or success or failure or sex although there is plenty of baseball, success, failure, and sex in the book. It is about people. People who became important to me as the story progressed. People who were really worth knowing in the magic way that a good novel gives us an opportunity to get to know a person. Thank you Chad Harbach.
fetish
It harkened me back to my own college, small, safe, of its own world where there were characters amongst everyone; you just had to hear their story. I read this book, little by little, to drag it out since I didn't want it to end.

But, also in telling a coworker the plot, I felt like she looked at me like a questioning dog with head cocked at an angle, just not finding the hook that she'd need to read this book in particular.

That said, I just really liked it. I liked all the characters. I liked the setting. Yeah, sure, some of the twists might be unbelievable or as someone said "oh, no, you didn't just go there," I was happy reading it. Some of these characters will stay with me. The wording, timing, twists, all made sense to me and I bought into all of it.

I am recommending it to my friends who read. I'll see what they think. But, to me, it matters not since I really, really liked this book.
A well-written, inspiring story that celebrates the body, mind and soul. I avoided it for five years because I assumed it was a "guy book" and overly focused on baseball. Though this is partially true, I find the novel to have universal appeal because of its depth and beauty. It's the best book I've read in several years --- I'm already looking forward to reading it again.