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by Ellen Douglas
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Humor
  • Author:
    Ellen Douglas
  • ISBN:
    0140121021
  • ISBN13:
    978-0140121025
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Penguin Books (December 1, 1989)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humor
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1459 kb
  • ePUB format
    1228 kb
  • DJVU format
    1971 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    163
  • Formats:
    lrf doc mobi rtf


Can't Quit You, Baby (Co. .has been added to your Cart. Ellen Douglas, whose real name is Josephine Haxton, was born in Natchez, Mississippi, and published her first novel, A Family's Affairs, in 1962.

Can't Quit You, Baby (Co.

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Find books like Can't Quit You, Baby (Contemporary American Fiction) from the world’s largest community of readers  . It is rare when a book this fine enters the world of contemporary American literature.

It is rare when a book this fine enters the world of contemporary American literature. Cornelia is rich, white, and pampered, the mistress of the house, who oversees a seemingly perfect world of smooth surfaces and stubborn silence. In the footsteps of Southern writers like Peter Taylor, Eudora Welty, and Flannery O'Connor, Ellen Douglas celebrates the resiliency of the human spirit in this story of two women bound by transgression and guilt, memory and illusion, gratitude and love. Ellen Douglas is not just one of our best Southern novelists.

Contemporary Fiction Literary Literature & Fiction. More by Ellen Douglas. A Family's Affairs (Voices of the South).

Written by. Ellen Douglas. Manufacturer: Penguin Books Release date: 1 December 1989 ISBN-10 : 0140121021 ISBN-13: 9780140121025. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Genre: Literary Fiction. Similar books by other authors. Dessa Rose Sherley Anne Williams. Meridian Alice Walker. Let the Dead Bury Their Dead and Other Stories Randall Kenan. The Moviegoer Walker Percy. Used availability for Ellen Douglas's Can't Quit You, Baby.

Can't quit you, baby. Contemporary American fiction, Penguin contemporary American fiction. Can't quit you, baby. Domestics - Fiction, Women - Southern States - Fiction, Race relations - Fiction, Southern States - Fiction. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

PDF This article examines Ellen Douglas's novel Can't Quit You, Baby, which can be situated in the sub-genre of.New York: Vintage books 1995. Ellen Douglas Sings the Blues for Cultural Appropriation in Can't Quit You. Jan 2007.

PDF This article examines Ellen Douglas's novel Can't Quit You, Baby, which can be situated in the sub-genre of the kitchen drama, focusing on the relationships between housewives and their black housekeepers in the South, at the crossroads of the issues of race, class an. Ellen Douglas Sings the Blues for Cultural Appropriation in Can't Quit You, Baby ". Studies in American Culture 30:1 (2007): 65-89. MLA International Bibliography.

“It is rare when a book this fine enters the world of contemporary American literature.” – The Boston Globe Two women share a Mississippi household for fifteen years, rolling out piecrusts and making conversation. Cornelia is rich, white, and pampered, the mistress of the house, who oversees a seemingly perfect world of smooth surfaces and stubborn silence. Tweet, her housekeeper, is a poor, black, world-weary woman with a ghost-ridden past. As the years go by, Cornelia and Tweet each endure moments of uncertainty and despair; each, in her time of need, is rescued by the other. In the footsteps of Southern writers like Peter Taylor, Eudora Welty, and Flannery O’Connor, Ellen Douglas celebrates the resiliency of the human spirit in this story of two women bound by transgression and guilt, memory and illusion, gratitude and love.“Ellen Douglas is not just one of our best Southern novelists. She is one of our best American novelists.” – The New York Times Book Review

Gold as Heart
The author becomes another character -- or maybe the readers do -- because we end up standing beside the author as she reflects on what she's written and what choices the characters are exercising or will be forced to do. Probably one of the more honest confrontations of the incipient rage crawling under the skin of any people forced to live in a system that consistently steps on them -- and Tweet's rage seems all the more understandable when she finally expresses it to the white person who has been, for the most part, fairly decent to her (her white employer). Swallowed like a lump is Cornelia's guilt over killing her husband, softly, with her words. Book worth re-reading, both for narrative sophistication, but also for graceful, exact use of language.
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
Another, older, look at the relationship between white women and their colored maids in the Jim Crow South. Then take it a little further and call it a book about women period. The style of the book is like nothing I've ever read before and the author is unfamiliar to me, but she must be really something to have come up with this motif!
Voodoogore
I felt that this book was somewhat disjointed and lost its way somewhere in the middle. However, the author rallies and has a walloping ending that really doesn't make a whole lot of sense, but at least is interesting. Not a pass along book for me however.
Zahisan
I adored this novel primarily for how complex the characters are.
Agamaginn
I didn't care about either of the 2 main characters. It was boring.
Purestone
I found this book startling on so many levels - the emotional honesty about the characters, the intellectual honesty about race, the sheer fascination of Tweet's description of her youth and Cornelia's struggle to come back from alienation, the extraordinary vividness of the prose. The writer takes a big risk in making her own role explicit, but the pay-off at the end is tremendous. Just a great book.
dermeco
This is the perfect book group selection. A wonderful book that provides so much to talk about. We all loved it!