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by John Irving
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Humor
  • Author:
    John Irving
  • ISBN:
    0345449347
  • ISBN13:
    978-0345449344
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Ballantine Books; Reprint edition (May 2002)
  • Pages:
    316 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humor
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1116 kb
  • ePUB format
    1193 kb
  • DJVU format
    1519 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    116
  • Formats:
    docx lrf lrf rtf


In The Fourth Hand, as in his past works, aims to tell a sweeping narrative with big, poignant themes .

In The Fourth Hand, as in his past works, aims to tell a sweeping narrative with big, poignant themes, and he succeeds with brio. Irving uses his characters' frailties to his advantage, creating a poignant fable of redemption and hope. The Fourth Hand jumps from page to page, the prose exploding with sarcasm, firing bullets at a modern culture of disaster heroes, misguided journalism, and silver-screen philosophy.

Читать онлайн The Fourth Hand.

John Irving THE FOURTH HAND A Novel For Richard Gladstein And Lasse Hallströ. person who is looking for something doesn’t travel very fast. the telephone repairman in E. B. White’s Stuart Little CHAPTER ONE The Lion Guy IMAGINE A YOUNG MAN on his way to a ond event-the loss of his left hand, long before he reached middle ag. s a schoolboy, he was a promis. Читать онлайн The Fourth Hand. For Richard Gladstein.

The Fourth Hand is a 2001 novel written by American novelist John Irving. It is his 10th published novel. While reporting a story from India, Patrick Wallingford, a New York television journalist, has his left hand eaten by a lion

The Fourth Hand is a 2001 novel written by American novelist John Irving. While reporting a story from India, Patrick Wallingford, a New York television journalist, has his left hand eaten by a lion. Millions of TV viewers witness the accident, and Patrick achieves instant notoriety as "the lion guy". In Boston, a renowned hand surgeon, Dr. Nicholas M. Zajac, awaits the opportunity to perform the nation's first hand transplant.

The Fourth Hand" is somewhat interesting and entertaining, but certainly not on par with Irving's masterpieces. In the afterward, Irving explains that he wanted to write a comedy and a love story. I am a huge John Irving fan because I like a story with a strange and quirky twist,but this book wasn't all together believable for me. That being said, I was never the less fascinated by John Irving's insight into the quaint ways of northern Wisconsinites and our inherent reverence for all things Packer related.

The Fourth Hand is characteristic of John Irving’s seamless storytelling and further explores some of the author’s recurring .

The Fourth Hand is characteristic of John Irving’s seamless storytelling and further explores some of the author’s recurring themes-loss, grief, love as redemption. A touch of the bizarre has always enlivened Irving’s novels, and here he out-does himself in spinning a grotesque incident into a dramatic story brimming with humour, sexual shenanigans and unexpected poignancy -Publishers Weekly

The Fourth Hand book. John Irving's characters are often quirky to say the least.

The Fourth Hand book. Normally they draw one in. Irving's typical forays into the minds of the odd but believable individuals who populate his stories are usually irresistably intriguing.

fourth hand - noun : the fourth player in various card games to have the right to bid or to play to any tric. seful english dictionary. International Committee of the Fourth International - For the International Committee of the Fourth International that superseded the United Secretariat of the Fourth International in 2003, please see reunified Fourth International.

Be a man, Patrick, one woman wrote. When he had problems with his first prosthesis, wearers of artificial limbs criticized him for using it incorrectly. He was equal y clumsy with an array of other prosthetic devices, but his wife was divorcing him-he had no time to practice.

While reporting a story from India, New York journalist Patrick Wallingford inadvertently becomes his own headline when his left hand is eaten by a lion. In Boston, a renowned surgeon eagerly awaits the opportunity to perform the nation’s first hand transplant. But what if the donor’s widow demands visitation rights with the hand? In answering this unexpected question, John Irving has written a novel that is by turns brilliantly comic and emotionally moving, offering a penetrating look at the power of second chances and the will to change.

Samugor
Boy gets gotten by too many girls; boy finds THE one and somehow doesn't blow it.
Amoral drifting, hilarious bumbling, scathing dissection of the news media, mysticism, the emptiness of passivity, feminism, ageism, racism, and the joy of parenting are rolled seamlessly into one rollercoaster ride of a story. And then there's the lost left hand at the center of it all. I loved it. Lots of reasons.
Tygolar
I'm apparently a lone voice crying in the wilderness on this one, but I found it a good read. No, it hasn't got some of the dimension and nuance of some of the other Irving books, but bear in mind that my favorite Irving work is "A Son of the Circus" -- for crying out loud, guys, a book doesn't have to be deep and profound to be good! Sometimes, it's enough that it just be fun.
I wasn't prepared to like Pat Wallingford, but his character got under my skin by the end of the book. He ended up a sort of endearing bumbler, vulnerable despite his apparent "made for television" slickness. He reminded me of Inspector Dhar from "Circus". Certain of the scenes in the book (dog turd lacrosse, the tryst between Patrick and Angie) were laugh-out-loud funny. And the ending was as marginally anticlimactic as most such scenes are in life. That's a great bit of restraint, to sacrifice drama for verisimilitude -- and in an Irving ending, restraint is a rare virtue indeed.
Perhaps we've become spoiled by Irving, the way he tends to spin such a great yarn while creating such unforgettable and nuanced characters as Homer Wells and Owen Meany . . . I don't think that was what this book was *for*. Vonnegut seldom bothered to develop a character beyond a strange situation and a beguiling turn of phrase! Why should it be a sin when Irving does it?
I liked it. I'll read it again.
Tygrafym
"The Fourth Hand" is somewhat interesting and entertaining, but certainly not on par with Irving's masterpieces. In the afterward, Irving explains that he wanted to write a comedy and a love story. He did. The first half of the book is a comedy, something like a slapstick Garp, and the second half is something of a ho-hum love story. Boy meets girl; girl has doubts; boy wins her over. Where is the tension? Why the abrupt shift in the middle? What is the purpose? The subplot about the doctor is equally without conflict.

This book feels like some kind of contractual obligation that Irving had with his publisher.
Grillador
You don't even have to check the title page when you see the plot summary: reporter for sleazy cable news operation gets his hand bitten off by a lion, and a surgeon offers his service if a donor hand is found. One is, only the widow of the donor demands visiting rights. This has to be a John Irving novel, right? And it is of course. Question 13 in those ditsy little discussion group questions that seem to be appearing at the end of every paperback novel these days asks you to ponder this: "In what way does this novel have elements of a fairy tale or fable?"
For two-thirds of the way through, the answer seems obvious: all ways. Mr. Irving has created a surrealistically marvelous, portrayal of the news media and the people who populate it (the action in the novel is set against real-life events such as a Super Bowl game the Green Bay Packers lost and the weekend John F. Kennedy Jr. died). Patrick Wallingford, the victim, known forever after to the public as "The Lion Guy," manages to sleep with nearly every woman he becomes involved with, the widow of the man whose hand Wallingford has been given seems somewhat demented, while the hand surgeon himself, unhappily divorced, seems more obsessed with doggydo than hand surgery. In short, everyone in Wallingford's world seem at least slightly dysfunctional.
But then in the last third, it all goes wobbly and sentimental, as the action moves from the Boston-New York axis to Green Bay, and the character of the widow, Doris Clausen, becomes (just when you were imagining Drew Barrymore playing her in the movie version), well, Rene Zellweger, while Wallingford--who you've been imagining as Jim Carrey--morphs into Robin Williams. The last two chapters slog on interminably. It's "love stuff" time. And sadly, as Mr. Irving's author's note at the end indicates, this was intentional. Indeed, question 14 asks you: "Would you call `The Fourth Hand' a Love Story'? Why or why not?"
Well now! As the cable news channel satirized here would no doubt trumpet, "we report, you decide."
Notes and asides: Mr. Irving gets moon phases right (unlike so many authors): a moon two or three days from full will indeed set at about 3:00 a.m.
Grari
John Irving's characters are different and real. His prose and descriptions are on target and flow smoothly. This is not a page turning beach read but is a fun read and was worth my time. Good job Mr. Irving.
Ce
I am a huge John Irving fan because I like a story with a strange and quirky twist,but this book wasn't all together believable for me. That being said, I was never the less fascinated by John Irving's insight into the quaint ways of northern Wisconsinites and our inherent reverence for all things Packer related. It is for this reason that I did enjoy reading this book and would recommend it.